Connecticut Fatal Accident Study:

Connecticut’s Deadliest Roads and Fatal Accident Statistics

MoneyGeek explored the various factors that contributed to the 787 fatal accidents in Connecticut between 2018 and 2020. Our analysis also allowed us to highlight the most deadly stretches of road in the state.

Advertising & Editorial DisclosureLast Updated: 12/15/2022
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From 2018 to 2020, 787 motor vehicle accidents in Connecticut resulted in fatalities. There are 45,916 miles of road in the Constitution State, and MoneyGeek analyzed data from accidents on 359 roads in the state to complete our analysis.

We identified various factors that were involved in deadly collisions across Connecticut. These include dangerous behaviors such as driving while intoxicated, being distracted or exceeding the allowable speed limit. We also explored when these accidents occurred to identify which months had the most fatal accidents.

Our analysis includes a data summary for each county, which shows which roads are the deadliest.

Key Findings

  • I-95, from Stratford to Bridgeport, is the deadliest stretch of road in Connecticut. Between 2018 and 2020, 8 fatal accidents occurred here.
  • More than 60% of deadly crashes between 2018 and 2020 involved drunk driving or speeding. Drunk driving was a factor in 31.5% (248) of fatal accidents, while speeding contributed to 30.9% (243).
  • Distracted driving was a factor in 3.6% of accidents — only 28 fatal crashes involved distracted driving. A MoneyGeek study found Connecticut to be the 47th worst state in the U.S. for distracted driving.
  • August had the highest number of fatal accidents between 2018 and 2020. Out of 787 deadly crashes from 2018 to 2020, 89, or 11.31%, occurred in August. The months with the next-highest numbers are July and June, with 86 (10.93%) and 77 (9.78%), respectively.
  • New Haven County had the highest number of deadly crashes of any county. The deadliest road within the county was I-95.

10 Deadliest Road Stretches in Connecticut


  • DEADLIEST ROAD IN CONNECTICUT
    I-95 from Exit 33 to Exit 26
    Stratford | Bridgeport
    I-95 from Exit 33 to Exit 26
    • Fatal Accidents:8
    • fatalities:8
    • Crashes Per Mile:1.6
    • distance:4.9
  • SR-10 from Kimberly Avenue to Boston Post Road
    New Haven
    SR-10 from Kimberly Avenue to Boston Post Road
    • Fatal Accidents:8
    • fatalities:8
    • Crashes Per Mile:6.9
    • distance:1.2
  • SR-8 from Exit 10 to Exit 3
    Trumbull | Bridgeport
    SR-8 from Exit 10 to Exit 3
    • Fatal Accidents:7
    • fatalities:9
    • Crashes Per Mile:1.6
    • distance:4.3
  • I-95 from Exit 40 to Exit 44
    West Haven | Orange | Milford
    I-95 from Exit 40 to Exit 44
    • Fatal Accidents:6
    • fatalities:6
    • Crashes Per Mile:1.2
    • distance:4.9
  • I-91 from Exit 15 to Exit 13
    Wallingford
    I-91 from Exit 15 to Exit 13
    • Fatal Accidents:6
    • fatalities:6
    • Crashes Per Mile:1.3
    • distance:4.6
  • US-1 from Rockview Street to Exit 51
    West Haven | East Haven | New Haven
    US-1 from Rockview Street to Exit 51
    • Fatal Accidents:6
    • fatalities:6
    • Crashes Per Mile:1.4
    • distance:4.3
  • SR-83 from Countrywood to Hockanum Boulevard
    Vernon
    SR-83 from Countrywood to Hockanum Boulevard
    • Fatal Accidents:6
    • fatalities:6
    • Crashes Per Mile:6.0
    • distance:1.0
  • SR-8 from Exit 37 to Exit 34
    Unknown | Watertown | Waterbury
    SR-8 from Exit 37 to Exit 34
    • Fatal Accidents:5
    • fatalities:7
    • Crashes Per Mile:1.6
    • distance:3.1
  • I-84 from Exit 59 to Exit 49
    Hartford | East Hartford
    I-84 from Exit 59 to Exit 49
    • Fatal Accidents:5
    • fatalities:6
    • Crashes Per Mile:1.2
    • distance:4.1
  • I-395 from Exit 14 to Exit 11
    Norwich
    I-395 from Exit 14 to Exit 11
    • Fatal Accidents:5
    • fatalities:6
    • Crashes Per Mile:1.1
    • distance:4.7

Drunk Driving Involved in 31.5% of Fatal Accidents

The number of deaths from motor vehicle accidents involving alcohol impairment increased by 14% from 2019 to 2020, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. MoneyGeek's study found that of Connecticut's 787 deadly crashes from 2018 to 2020, 248 (31.5%) involved drunk driving. During this three-year period, drunk driving was a factor in more fatal accidents than speeding, distracted driving or winter-weather conditions.

In Connecticut, the legal limit for driving with alcohol in your system is a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08%. Law enforcement officers may charge you with a DUI if you have a BAC of 0.08% or higher. Many people think they're fully capable of operating a vehicle after several alcoholic drinks. However, having just two drinks can put your BAC at around 0.02%, impairing your driving skills.

The costs of drunk driving are considerable, even if you take the fatalities out of the picture. The consequences aren't limited to paying fines — you may also face jail time and lose your driving privileges.

A DUI conviction makes finding affordable auto insurance in Connecticut challenging. It also requires carrying an SR-22 in Connecticut, which is more expensive than other types of coverage.

Speeding Is a Factor in 30.9% of Fatal Crashes

Traveling beyond the allowable speed limit puts you and your passengers in a precarious situation because you're more likely to get into an accident. Speeding was a factor in 29% of all fatal accidents in 2020. In Connecticut, it contributed to 30.9% of deadly crashes from 2018 to 2020 — that’s 243 instances.

You'll need more stopping distance when speeding, so stopping in time to prevent a collision may not be possible. It also increases the force of impact, making severe injuries (or worse) more likely after a crash.

Distracted Driving Contributed to 3.6% of Fatal Accidents

Between 2018 and 2020, distracted driving contributed to only 3.6% of deadly crashes (a total of 28) in Connecticut. The state's distracted driving law prohibits drivers from using handheld communication devices while driving. The only exceptions are if they use its hands-free features or during emergencies. Young drivers — those under 18 — cannot use mobile phones any time they're behind the wheel.

MoneyGeek's distracted driving study ranks Connecticut as the 47th-worst state for distracted driving. It fared better than 92% of other states.

August Had More Fatal Accidents Than Any Other Month

The highest number of deadly crashes in Connecticut happened in August. It accounted for 89 (11.3%) fatal accidents between 2018 and 2020.

Following August were July and June. These months had 86 (10.9%) and 77 (9.8%) deadly accidents, respectively. While MoneyGeek analyzed data from accidents involving people of all ages, it's worth noting that all three months fall within the 100 deadliest days of summer — what the American Automobile Association (AAA) Foundation calls the period from Memorial Day to Labor Day. According to the AAA, which looked at data from 2010 to 2019, there were typically more fatal accidents nationwide involving teens during the summer months.

Average Fatal Accidents by Month
Month
Fatal Accidents
Drunk Driving Related
Distracted Driving Related
Winter Conditions
Speeding- Related
% of Total

January

60

14

0

1

14

7.6%

February

51

14

4

0

20

6.5%

March

47

11

3

0

16

6.0%

April

57

15

1

1

22

7.2%

May

61

21

3

0

22

7.8%

June

77

26

3

0

30

9.8%

July

86

36

0

0

26

10.9%

August

89

27

3

0

30

11.3%

September

62

25

3

0

18

7.9%

October

70

19

2

0

17

8.9%

November

74

21

3

1

13

9.4%

December

53

19

3

2

15

6.7%

Driving Safely Protects You, Others and Your Wallet

Whether in Connecticut or elsewhere, road safety is everyone's business. Being a safe driver doesn't just protect you and your passengers — it also helps you save money. But since even the safest drivers can get into accidents, having at least the minimum liability insurance coverage mandated by the state provides a financial buffer in case of an accident. And there are several benefits to opting for full coverage car insurance, which can help cover both damage you cause to others and the damage to your own car, thus better protecting you, your loved ones and your assets after a crash.

The average driver typically spends about $1,442 per year for car insurance in Connecticut. However, rates may change depending on where you live. For example, auto insurance in Bridgeport, the state's largest city by population, costs the same as the state average, but the annual premium for drivers from other cities may vary.

Besides your location, insurers also consider your unique profile. So, factors like your age and driving history may affect your rates. When canvassing for coverage, don't forget to compare estimates from multiple providers. It can help identify the most affordable car insurance company for you.

Fatal Accidents and Most Dangerous Roads: County Breakdown

MoneyGeek broke down the deadly crashes in Connecticut from 2018 to 2020 by county. Our study showed that, together, the five counties with the highest counts account for 84.4% of the statewide total. That's 664 accidents resulting in fatalities.

New Haven had the highest count at 222. Most of these crashes happened along I-95 and involved drunk driving and speeding.

Fatal Accidents and Contributing Factors By County
County
Fatal Accidents
Drunk Driving Related
Distracted Driving Related
Speeding Related
Most Deadly Road (Fatal Accidents)

New Haven

222

61

10

56

I-95 (13)

Hartford

188

60

11

68

I-91 (13)

Fairfield

127

32

3

43

I-95 (22)

New London

70

28

0

18

I-95 (10)

Litchfield

57

23

1

16

SR-8 (9)

Tolland

44

13

1

15

SR-32 (7)

Windham

40

17

0

15

US-6 (5)

Middlesex

39

14

2

12

SR-9 (7)

Methodology

MoneyGeek analyzed data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Fatal Accident Reporting System (FARS) database using fatality data from 2018, 2019 and 2020. Currently, 2020 is the latest data available in the system.

About the Author


Doug Milnes, CFA headshot

Doug Milnes is the head of marketing and communications at MoneyGeek. He has spent more than a decade in corporate finance performing valuations for Duff and Phelps and financial planning and analysis for various companies including OpenTable. He holds a master’s degree in Predictive Analytics (Data Science) from Northwestern University and is a CFA charter holder. Doug geeks out on building financial and predictive models and using data to make informed decisions.


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