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Cheapest Car Insurance Companies and Quotes in Texas

Finding the most affordable car insurance company in Texas depends on several individualized factors. MoneyGeek ranked the cheapest car insurance companies based on comprehensive and collision coverage for the average driver. Comparing quotes and annual premiums can give you an idea of how much you’ll pay for coverage as you compare car insurance companies.

Average Comprehensive and Collision Rates in Texas

These prices are approximate costs for the average driver. Each carrier underwrites these factors differently. Some may place a higher risk premium on DUIs or prior speeding tickets than others. Some companies may offer discounts for having a clean driving record, a high school student with good grades or your vehicle's safety features. It pays to shop around.

Compare Auto Insurance Rates

Ensure you're getting the best rate for your auto insurance. Compare quotes from the top insurance companies.

Insurance Rates

Cheapest Liability Car Insurance in Texas

For some drivers, liability-only coverage can be an option. This insures you for the cost of damages and medical expenses to the other driver if you are ever at fault in an accident. Your own costs do not come under the umbrella of liability coverage. For this, you would need to opt for comprehensive and collision coverage. A minimum liability requirement is present in most states. Insurance companies can offer you better protection with optional higher levels of coverage as well. In Texas, Farmers can be the most affordable option in most cases, both in terms of the state minimum coverage and a higher 50/100/50 coverage level.

Average Cost for Liability Coverage

The Best Car Insurance Companies in Texas for 2021

MoneyGeek used various factors, including customer satisfaction, affordability, claims experience and financial strength, to determine the best car insurance companies in Texas.

To arrive at a score for each criterion, MoneyGeek assessed information from J.D. Power's U.S. Auto Insurance Study and AM Best's financial strength ratings, the industry standards for insurance company ratings and review. Along with unique pricing data, MoneyGeek ranked each study equally to formulate the final rating out of 100.

Expand All Rankings +

1

USAAScore: 100
+

5/5

User Satisfaction

5/5

Claims Ratings

5/5

Affordability

A++

Financial Stability

2

GEICOScore: 85
+

3/5

User Satisfaction

3/5

Claims Ratings

3/5

Affordability

A++

Financial Stability

3

State FarmScore: 85
+

3/5

User Satisfaction

3/5

Claims Ratings

3/5

Affordability

A++

Financial Stability

4

AAAScore: 85
+

3/5

User Satisfaction

2/5

Claims Ratings

5/5

Affordability

A+

Financial Stability

5

AllstateScore: 80
+

3/5

User Satisfaction

2/5

Claims Ratings

3/5

Affordability

A+

Financial Stability

6

ProgressiveScore: 80
+

2/5

User Satisfaction

3/5

Claims Ratings

3/5

Affordability

A+

Financial Stability

7

NationwideScore: 80
+

3/5

User Satisfaction

3/5

Claims Ratings

2/5

Affordability

A+

Financial Stability

8

FarmersScore: 77.5
+

3/5

User Satisfaction

3/5

Claims Ratings

2/5

Affordability

A

Financial Stability

9

Liberty MutualScore: 72.5
+

2/5

User Satisfaction

2/5

Claims Ratings

2/5

Affordability

A

Financial Stability

While USAA scores highly in many areas, this provider is only available to military members, veterans and their families.

Market Share by Company

If you're looking for a combination of service, pricing and knowledge that matches your needs, you may want to consider getting a quote from one of the largest insurance companies in Texas. According to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, 14.99% of the market share in the state, State Farm is the largest auto insurance carrier in Texas.

Compare Auto Insurance Rates

Ensure you're getting the best rate for your auto insurance. Compare quotes from the top insurance companies.

Insurance Rates

What Is the Average Cost of Car Insurance in Texas?

Auto insurance premiums vary depending on many unique factors. MoneyGeek calculated the average rates for 100/300/100 comprehensive and collision insurance for a 40-year-old male driving a Toyota Camry with no record of tickets or accidents. Depending on your coverage level, location, driving history and age, your car insurance premium may be significantly higher or lower than these Texas averages.

  • Average Driver: $1,316
  • DUI: $1,987
  • Speeding Ticket: $1,451
  • Poor Credit Score: $2,360
  • Seniors: $1,455
  • Students: $3,257

Cheapest Car Insurance for Drivers With a DUI in Texas

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 13,592 people were killed in alcohol-related car crashes in Texas from 2009-2018. 2.2% of drivers in Texas say they have driven after drinking too much in the last 30 days.

Those convicted of a DUI in Texas face jail terms of 3 days to six months and a mandatory license suspension of 90 days to a year. There are also direct fines and fees of up to $2,000. If it's your second offense, that fine could go as high as $4,000. And if it's your third offense, or if there is a minor child in the car, your fine in Texas could run as high as $10,000.

Average Car Insurance Rates With a DUI

Not only can having a DUI in Texas increase your car insurance rates, but you may also face jail time and fines. The real costs of a DUI can last for years in terms of insurance premiums, legal fees and education expenses and more.

Cheapest Car Insurance With Tickets in Texas

Moving violations can negatively impact your auto insurance premiums. Distracted driving is dangerous and increases your odds of getting in an accident, making this infraction a major concern for insurers.

Average Car Insurance Rates With a Ticket

On average, annual car insurance premiums in Texas with a single conviction for speeding or distracted driving increase by $274.10.

Cheapest Car Insurance Companies in Texas for Drivers With Bad Credit

Many insurance companies note an increase in claims among people with poor credit scores. In fact, it was a 2003 University of Texas study commissioned by then-Lieutenant Governor Bill Ratliff that established a significant inverse correlation between credit scores and claims for the insurance industry.

Texas is among the states that allow insurers to use credit scores as one factor to set premiums. With an average credit score of 680 according to Experian, Texans rank 48th in the nation for good credit, which means that many may be paying more for auto insurance.

Average Car Insurance Rates for Drivers With Bad Credit

If your credit score has been negatively affected because of identity theft or a specific life event beyond your ordinary control, you may qualify for an exception to credit underwriting. Examples include job loss, divorce, the death of an immediate family member and the like. To request an exemption, simply submit the request to the insurance company in writing, along with documentation.

Once the carrier has your request, documentation and the request meets state requirements, the carrier can only consider credit information not related to the negative life event, or they must assign a neutral credit score.

If you believe your request for a credit underwriting exception was improperly denied, you can visit the Texas Department of Insurance Complaint Process web page to file a complaint.

Cheapest Car Insurance Companies in Texas for Seniors

In Texas, older drivers are subject to increased safety laws and regulations. In 2017, 9.9% of fatal car crashes in Texas were caused by drivers over the age of 65.

According to the Texas Department of Public Safety, drivers between the ages of 79 and 84 must renew their license in person every six years, while drivers aged 85 and older are required to renew every two years.

Senior drivers are not only required to participate in more regular license renewals and screenings, but they often pay higher insurance rates in Texas. But not all companies start increasing premiums at the same age. Some hike rates at age 65, while others wait until age 70 or even later. As you age, it pays to shop around every few years for affordable car insurance for seniors.

Average Car Insurance Rates for Seniors

If you're an older driver, you may be able to offset some or all of the higher premiums in several ways, including taking a defensive driving course. You may be able to get discounts if you take a defensive driving course. Details vary depending on your carrier. Approved courses include Defensive Driving by the National Safety Council, American Safety Council or IMPROV.

Cheapest Car Insurance for Students in Texas

Younger drivers, including high school and college-aged drivers, are considered a higher-risk group. Teen drivers are particularly accident-prone and insurance rates reflect this.

However, some carriers are friendlier than others when it comes to setting rates for drivers in their teens and early 20s. Rates for this group vary substantially. It pays to shop around, especially right before a teen driver goes to college or owns his or her first car.

If you're a parent or guardian, you should also explore adding your child to your insurance policy as an additional driver, rather than having them get their own separate policy. Whether you are a parent of a young driver or you're a young driver buying your own coverage, you may be able to get a break on your premiums.

Average Car Insurance Rates for Students

Maintain a safe driving record, protect and improve your credit score and drive a vehicle with safety features installed. Stick to sensible sedans, SUVs, vans and trucks since these are cheaper to insure than sports cars.

You may also get a discount for bundling multiple policies within your family at the same company.

Increasing your deductible is another good way of saving money on premiums as long as you can afford the deductible if you have a claim.

If you're a Texan going to school in another state and taking your car with you, notify your insurance company as soon as possible. The agent can help you be sure that your policy matches the insurance requirements of your new state.

The Problem of Distracted Teen Driving

In 2018, there were more than 540,000 car accidents on Texas roadways, with 95,572 of them about 18% attributable to distracted driving, according to the Texas Department of Transportation. These are accidents that are due to things like texting while driving, cell phone use, etc. These distracted driving-related accidents were responsible for 394 deaths and 2,340 serious injuries.

Distracted driving is such a problem among young Texans that the Texas Department of Safety created an eight-part video about it. Called IMPACT Texas Teen Drivers (ITTD), the series explores the dangers of distracted driving through real-life stories of teens who died from texting, talking on cell phones and otherwise multitasking while driving. "It's not about bad kids doing bad things, but about good kids making poor choices," the department states. It's now a required part of every driver's education class for teens in Texas.

The insurance department also reminds drivers that some policies require all covered drivers to be named on the policy, so tell your insurance agent as soon as your child turns 16. Otherwise, the TDI warns, "if you don't have all the drivers in your family listed on the policy and the company learns about them later because of an accident claim, for instance the company may bill you for the extra premium you should have paid, deny your claim and coverage, or refuse to renew your policy in the future."

Premium Comparison by Student Type

No matter how much your teen or college student wants a sports car, insurers advise you to just say no. Sedans or minivans are a safer choice and your annual premiums will likely be much lower.

Insurance Rate Information for Military Drivers and Veterans

According to Governing, Texas has more than 110,913 active-duty personnel. Members of the military living in the Lone Star State may be eligible for military discounts on regular auto insurance. They may also be eligible for a USAA membership. Shop around for the best rates available to veterans, bearing in mind that a military discount also requires a good driving record.

Active-duty servicemen and women leaving Texas temporarily should check with their insurance company before they depart. Some companies allow veterans to suspend their auto insurance coverage while a vehicle is not in use.

Average Rates for Texas service members

male
25 years$1,608
50 years$1,203
female
25 years$1,539
50 years$1,200

Car Insurance in Texas: What You Need to Know

If you own or operate a motor vehicle in Texas, you need to show that you are financially capable of covering any damage you may cause. State law requires that insurance must be carried for all vehicles (except semi-trailers and trailers) registered for on-road use.

The Texas Transportation Code outlines one exception to the rule: You can avoid the requirement for insurance if you deposit at least $55,000 in cash or eligible securities with the Texas Comptroller or a cashier’s check with the county judge.

Proof of Insurance in Texas

Drivers in the state must provide proof of insurance or alternative documentation. According to the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles, you need to show proof of insurance in several circumstances:

  • When asked for it by a police officer
  • When involved in a car accident
  • When registering and renewing a vehicle registration
  • When applying for and renewing a driver's license

Auto insurers are required to send policyholders an insurance card. Individuals relying on insurance alternatives will receive certificates in lieu of an insurance card. You can carry your card on your smartphone.

Minimum Liability Insurance Requirements in Texas

Drivers in Texas are required to post a $55,000 bond or purchase liability insurance. Collision and comprehensive coverage are optional unless you financed the car, in which case the lender will probably require such coverage as a condition of the loan. But even if you own the car outright, liability coverage is a must. The minimum mandatory coverage limits outlined by the Texas Department of Insurance are:

  • $30,000 for each injured person
  • $60,000 for injuries per accident
  • $25,000 for property damage per accident

A policy with this minimum level of insurance is called 30/60/25 coverage.

Note that these are just the state minimums. When cars and medical care are both getting more expensive, the minimum amount may not be enough to cover the entire cost of the accident. Most insurance and consumer groups recommend drivers carry 100/300/100 coverage instead of the state's minimum liability coverage.

High-Risk Auto Insurance Program in Texas

Individuals who don't qualify for liability insurance through traditional channels may obtain coverage through the Texas Automobile Insurance Plan Association. To qualify, applicants must meet these requirements:

  • Have a valid driver's license
  • Be a resident of Texas or have a vehicle registered in Texas
  • Certify that two or more companies have denied insurance coverage within the past 60 days

Alternatives to Insurance in Texas

Under Texas law, uninsured residents may legally drive if they can present proof of financial responsibility. According to the Texas Transportation Code, approved alternatives to car insurance in Texas include:

  • $55,000 cash or securities deposit with the state comptroller
  • $55,000 cash or cashier's check deposit with the county judge
  • Surety bond filed with the Texas Department of Public Safety

In each instance, drivers who opt for this alternative must carry a certificate of deposit or a surety bond deposit instead of an insurance card.

What Happens If You Don't Have Car Insurance in Texas?

Research presented by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners shows that most uninsured motorists do not have car insurance because they cannot afford it (or, in the case of illegal immigrants, are not allowed to buy it). Texas assesses stiff penalties on uninsured motorists. Drivers caught without insurance or a valid alternative can face the following consequences:

  • First offense: $175–$350 fine
  • Second offense: $350–$1,000 fine, a two-year suspension of driver's license and car impoundment
  • Driving without a license: Up to $2,000 fine and/or 180 days in jail

Texas has also launched TexasSure, an automated database that identifies drivers who do not have mandatory insurance coverage. This program notifies drivers who allow their coverage to lapse.

How Much Coverage Do You Need in Texas?

While Texas only requires 30/60/25 minimum liability coverage, many drivers should consider buying insurance that goes beyond the minimum levels of protection. A 100/300 liability policy, one that covers $100,000 for a single person in an accident and $300,000 for all individuals in an accident, is much more likely to protect you if you cause an accident with severe injuries or damages to the other driver or vehicle. If you have a newer vehicle or your car is not yet paid for, it’s also a good idea to carry comprehensive and collision coverage to cover damage to your vehicle.

Insurance companies in the state offer a Texas Personal Automobile Policy, a standardized policy that offers eight types of insurance in one policy. But because exclusions vary from policy to policy, the Texas Office of Public Insurance Counsel recommends drivers know exactly who and what is covered.

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Expert Advice on Finding Cheap Car Insurance in Texas

To help you find trustworthy and accurate information on car insurance in Texas, MoneyGeek received expert advice from proven professionals. The perspectives and opinions expressed are those of the individual contributor.

  1. What are the key factors drivers in Texas should look for when searching for the best auto insurance coverage?

    The limits – amounts of coverage for bodily injury per person and per accident as well as coverage for property damage per accident – are important. The minimum thresholds vary by state, but objectively speaking, those are probably too low for most drivers’ comfort and needs. Medical costs can rise very quickly, even with moderate injuries from an accident. Also, keep in mind that any vehicle you have financed will probably need to be covered up to $100,000 for injury and $300,000 property damage, but it is best to check with your lender. The size of the deductible is equally important; drivers will frequently opt to go with the higher deductible in exchange for a lower monthly premium payment, but this means when it is time to file a claim, you are responsible for a higher sum out of pocket.

    The first thing to be aware of is that rates for all drivers are not the same. Rates differ from one person to another and from one company to the next. The cost depends on many factors, such as where you live, how much you drive, your driving record, the type of car, your age, and even your credit score. Also, all companies are not the same. Some try to sell to only the better drivers; others make a point of trying to lure customers who may have problems obtaining insurance. Another factor is how much insurance you want to purchase. Texas requires a minimum amount of insurance to protect people you injure, $30,000 per individual, $60,000 per accident, and $25,000 for property damages. Many people believe this is not sufficient to protect them and purchase much larger coverage amounts. You also should consider other types of auto insurance coverage to protect your losses. Think about how much and what type of coverage you want and then shop around.

    Do not just go by price alone. When comparing quotes, be sure to make an apples to apples comparison. That is, pay particular attention to the coverages being offered by each insurance company and then compare the quotes. Try to avoid being underinsured or overinsured. Try to avoid being underinsured or overinsured. Too often, consumers select deductibles that are too low, resulting in higher premiums or select coverages that are too high, also resulting in higher premiums. Of course, the deductibles and coverages that a given consumer selects is a subjective decision, so be sure to make the choice that is right for you.

    Price and fulfillment of state requirements should always be the baseline. From there, personal circumstances may enter, such as age, records, the price of the car to be insured, and the type of insurance needed. For Texas specifically, a client needs to know what kind of coverage they are getting. Texas law requires an insurer to have at least $30,000 of coverage for injuries per person, up to a total of $60,000 per accident, and $25,000 of coverage for property damage.

    Drivers should consider the required premiums and coverage, but also the likelihood that the insurance company will raise the customers’ rates if they get into an accident or if they receive a violation (e.g., speeding ticket) and how the customer service is of the company. Customer service is often an overlooked factor, but I think it is critical that an auto insurance company be easily accessible and helpful because getting into an accident is already a very stressful event. Customers don’t want their experience working with the car insurance company to be an even more stressful process than that.

    Texas drivers should not look exclusively at pricing. Customer service is very important too, as it varies widely from insurer to insurer, and as drivers will appreciate the importance of quality service when they need it the most.

    Drivers need to understand what their insurance needs are. They need to really think about the answers to what type and amount of coverage the consumer will get tailored to specific consumer factors, such as income, number and type of dependents (i.e. teenagers) on the policy, consumer's risk tolerance (are they willing to assume the risk that comes with just having a policy that covers the bare minimum requirements or do they want to pay more to ensure that they have plenty of coverage).

    Find a strong, reputable company. Find an agent that will spend the time with you to help you:

    • Understanding your specific needs
    • Picking the right coverages for you and your family
    • Building a wall of protection around what you have built or what you are working toward

    Understand that there are combinations of protection other than simple auto insurance that can give you a plethora of coverage without breaking the budget.

    Insurance premiums start out with a base rate based on a broad range of rating factors, such as geographical location, age, gender, marital status, driving experience, driving and claims record, vehicle type, and deductibles. In Texas, there are several ways to save money on auto insurance. First, ask for higher deductibles and reduce coverage on your older cars. Some companies offer discounts to motorists who drive a lower than average number of miles per year. Low mileage discounts can also apply to drivers who carpool to work. Second, buy homeowners and auto coverage from the same insurer. Third, take advantage of low mileage discounts. Your rates will be higher if you drive your car to and from work or use it for business. Forth, put antitheft devices or alarming systems on your car. You may also get a discount if you take a defensive driving course. If there is a young driver on the policy who is a good student, has taken a driver’s education course or is away at college without a car, you may qualify for a lower rate. Moreover, ask about group insurance. Some companies offer reductions to drivers who get insurance through a group plan from their employers, through professional, business and alumni groups or other associations. Ask your employer and inquire with groups or clubs you are a member of to see if this is possible. Finally, maintain a good driving and credit record. Companies offer discounts to policyholders who have not had any accidents or moving violations for a number of years.

    Not all types of vehicles have the same insurance premiums. So, if a driver is choosing their next car, it may be wise to get some preliminary quotes for the different types of vehicles they have in mind. That way, they will know the range of insurance premiums they are up against when making their final choice of automobile. For example, vehicles associated with families, such as minivans, tend to have significantly lower insurance premiums than sports or luxury cars. Another thing for drivers to consider is their credit score since this is used to a large extent to determine premiums. So, if a driver doesn't have good credit, it may be beneficial to work on improving their credit before shopping for car insurance. An important consideration is to determine the maximum amount of deductible drivers are willing to afford. In general, the higher the deductible you are willing to accept, the lower the premium.

    Texans should always look for insurance that meets their needs. It is possible to be over or underinsured. Therefore, people should ensure that they are optimizing their insurance usage. Some factors individuals can look for could be in the form of coverage limits, monthly premiums, and possible discounts.

    The main factor when choosing the best auto insurance coverage is to research the service they provide to their customers. In other words, how does the company respond to paying out claims, where does your vehicle get repaired, and what are the steps for making a claim. An insurance company is only needed when you have an accident and during that time, it’s all about how quickly your vehicle will be repaired and the quality of the repair.

    Insurance premiums are determined by the level of protection desired. Going for the Texas state minimum coverage of 30/60/25 (bodily injury individual/bodily injury event/property damage) is the cheapest option but is not suitable for all consumers. Minimum coverage only covers $25,000 in damages to others. That may be ok if you hit an old car, but if you hit a brand new luxury or imported car, coverage won’t be enough and you’ll end up “owing” the money and have to pay from your future paychecks. Similarly, $60,000 may not be enough to pay the hospital bills of a family of 4 if they are severely injured. So companies will recommend a higher level of protection. When you compare quotes, these three numbers must be the same across companies. That is how you can make a fair comparison. Also, minimum coverage doesn’t pay for damages or theft of your vehicle. So if you want to repair your car, you’ll need to pay for that. The higher the value of your vehicle, the more you will pay. In this same line, the deductible level is an important decision. Going for higher deductibles will lower the premium. You have choices between 250 all the way up to 2000. Most companies recommend 500 or 1000. Keep this number constant when you compare quotes. As a rule of thumb, the higher your income or wealth, the more coverage you’ll need. For example, you choose 25 for PD (property damage) and you have an investment account with 100,000 that you plan to use for retirement. If you cause an accident that costs more than 75,000, your insurance will only pay for 25,000, and you’ll get sued and probably lose 50,000 of your own money. It makes sense to increase your PD protection to 50K or 100K for a few more dollars a month and know that you have more protection. In general, what you pay for liability insurance depends on your personal characteristics; the older you are, the more education you have, the higher credit score you have, the fewer accidents/traffic tickets you have, the lower the premium will be. Conversely, the higher number of accidents and or traffic tickets will increase your premiums or make you uninsurable. Be aware that some national companies will reject young, single drivers with just one accident. In some cases, after a big “at fault” accident, premiums will be increased and in some cases, these national companies will kick out their customers for being “bad drivers." In fact, this practice by large companies has created business opportunities for smaller companies willing to insure “higher risk” drivers. Next, you have to make decisions about uninsured motorists, rental reimbursement, roadside assistance, etc. Uninsured motorists is an optional coverage that is normally recommended. It covers your car if the driver who hits you doesn’t carry insurance or doesn’t have enough insurance to pay for your damages. Because it is not an expensive coverage, it is quite desirable because you’ll never know if you’ll be a hit and run victim. Rental reimbursement and roadside assistance are optional services. Rental reimbursement allows you to rent a vehicle while your car is in the shop. That is quite useful if you live alone and/or need your car to go to work. Roadside assistance is not needed for many new cars that offer 24/7 assistance, but they are quite useful if you are driving an older car. Overall, you need to decide which levels of protection you need and what optional services you want. Premiums are usually quoted separately, and you can easily change the levels of coverage so you can see whether you want to pay for the higher level of protection or not. To be consistent, remember to write the coverages chosen and use the same levels when you get a quote from a competitor.

    While customers may think all insurance companies are the same, customers would be wise to find a company that offers good quality policies (without a lot of exclusions or other fine print that may not pay a claim) and high levels of customer satisfaction. Check out how some property & casualty insurance companies fare in the American Customer Satisfaction Index: ratings.

    Texas drivers should verify they're carrying at least the minimum coverage the state requires. At the time of this article, those coverages are:

    • Bodily Injury Liability: $30,000 per person and $60,000 per accident
    • Property Damage Liability: $25,000
    • Uninsured Motorist Bodily Injury: $30,000 per person and $60,000 per accident unless you reject this coverage
    • Uninsured Motorist Property Damage: $25,000 and a $250 deductible unless your reject this coverage

    Although these are the minimum coverages required, each driver should take their personal situations into inventory when choosing what's right for them. Personally, I like to see coverages of $100,000 and $300,000 (compared to the $30,000 / $60,000 state minimums). Having higher coverage isn't adding much more cost to the average person's policy; however, that increased coverage will be dramatically more powerful in the event of an accident. We rarely hear people say they wish they had LESS insurance in place... typically they're kicking themselves for not having MORE insurance coverage in place. Having only the minimum coverages in place could prove to be financially irresponsible when average accident damages are higher than those coverage levels.

    The primary factor is that the company is licensed to operate and insure in Texas. Like practically everything in our culture, fraud is a common concern and should always be top-of-mind. Once confirmed, finding a third party that rates insurance companies for important metrics such as average time for claims resolutions, customer satisfaction, price, consumer diversification, etc. are transparent factors that would make a potential client more likely to choose one company over another. I do not think the BBB is sufficient. The third party needs to be more along the lines of a consumer interest group that is not beholding to anyone in any way.

  2. What steps can drivers in Texas take to find affordable car insurance?

    Most insurance companies are similar with respect to what they can provide their customers. As discussed above, however, rates can differ substantially based on various factors. The Texas Department of Insurance (TDI) regulates and licenses insurance companies in Texas. Its website contains a great deal of helpful information under the “Consumer” tab, including a way to compare policy cost, number of customer complaints, and financial strength (www.tdi.texas.gov/consumer/index.html). Its Consumer Protection staff also can answer your insurance questions at 800-252-3439. Many other entities have similar websites allowing you to compare coverage and pricing.

    You can visit the Texas Department of Insurance website. There, you can compare quotes from various reputable insurance companies. The website also lists the contact information for the insurance company (phone and website link), and more importantly, it lists a “complaint index” for the company and an “AM Best” rating for the insurance company.

    The first step you can take to finding the most affordable insurance is to do your research, specifically shop around. Especially for online companies since proximity to your location is not an issue. Get different quotes from different companies and adjust your discounts to get the premium you want. Another benefit is to know your driving habits and adjust the policy as need be. Any buyer can save premium by coming prepared instead of just accepting the first offer. For this purpose, use third party comparison sites, get rates from several different highly rated insurance companies whose policies meet your personal needs and compare the premiums for those specific policies.

    It is a cliché, but I think it is important to shop around and compare different quotes that you receive. Then, if you have a preference towards one company but the quote may be higher than one you received from another company, then you should discuss it with your preferred company by informing them of the quote you received and asking if they can match that rate. There is often room for negotiation with insurance rates.

    Although it can be helpful to utilize web sites that promise to compare insurance coverage, it is always wise to contact insurance companies directly by phone or online to obtain reliable source information.

    Most consumers are now using search engines when looking for insurance. If affordability is the primary factor that is being emphasized, then price is going to be the go-to criteria that consumers will search for. However, it's really value that they are looking for - so is price synonymous with value? It goes back to my earlier comment about buying the least expensive insurance. When you have a problem, you really end up paying more because everything is an add on and additional coverage is priced separately. So really, it's about the value proposition and that's what is provided by buying from a well-known full-service agency - that relationship is value added and in the long run, turns out to be a much more affordable option. However, conveying this value proposition is an education process. This education process typically occurs through television advertising, so a coordinated effort between all advertising vehicles is essential in effectively delivering this information. Also, an education process can occur when consumers purchase a car. Not recommending a specific insurance provider, rather educating them on the type of coverage they should consider based on their specific family's needs.

    You should compare rates with several companies and try to get all discounts you are eligible for. This is especially important for young drivers. Non-smokers, non-drinkers, students with good grades, anti-lock brakes, lane warnings, auto-braking, etc. can all reduce rates—also, defensive driving and a good driving record.

    The best idea is to never buy a new car and load up on liability. Losing a 5 to 10K car will not seriously wreck your finances, but a 1 million dollar lawsuit will. Anyone with any money in hopes of having any money needs 100K homeowners liability, 300K auto liability; And a 1 million umbrella.

    It really depends on what “affordable” means to that person. To each person, it means something totally different. Some always seek a smaller monthly payment, not knowing or seemingly not caring about what could happen to their future should the unthinkable happen. If they are looking for the least expensive, and State Farm does not work for them, I have some companies that I can refer them to that may be able to help. For example, Clay Paul Insurance is a brokerage company and one of the companies I refer to when needed. They will shop low-cost carriers to get the best rates. The service will vary because, more than likely, you would be with several carriers instead of just one.

    There are a few steps you can take to get lower insurance premiums in Texas. First, do some insurance premium comparison shopping. Second, consider the factors that may affect your insurance premium. For example, compare the number of miles you drove this year versus the previous year. A significant decrease in the mileage you drive might help you get a lower quote. Also, consider completing a defensive driving course online, for example, to get your ticket dismissed, you can take a traffic course that fits with your schedule at www.defensivedriving.com and bring the certificate to the court. Moreover, insuring multiple vehicles (or your home) through the same insurance company or looking for a plan with a higher deductible. Switching from a $500 deductible to a $1,000 deductible can save as much as 20% on your insurance premium. You might even want to eliminate certain types of insurance not required by law in Texas; for instance, you could forego collision and comprehensive coverage on very old cars. Collision and comprehensive rates are highest for luxury, high-performance, and sports cars. Finally, stay out of accidents and avoid speeding. Safe drivers may receive a five percent or more discount from your insurance company. If you go without an accident or traffic violation for three years, your car insurance company may even further reduce your rate.

    As a first step, I would recommend keeping track of the number of miles drivers use their vehicles in an average week. This is an important data point that could mean high savings as pay-per-mile insurance becomes more and more popular. Some companies, both new and well-established players, are incorporating insurance products that charge lower premiums to drivers who are light users of their vehicles and higher to those drivers with heavier usages. Knowing how many miles you usually drive during an average week will prove useful to know if you can benefit from these products. Most companies will require installing a tracking device in your car that will log the usage and adjust your premium accordingly. Another important step is to check with your credit cards for promotional discounts with certain companies. Some credit card companies offer their account holders perks such as preferential deals with selected insurers. Also, consider other insurance coverage you are already paying (property, life, etc.). Some insurance companies will offer significant discounts when you bundle two or more of your coverages.

    There are numerous steps one can take to find affordable auto insurance. For starters, one should compare rates from various providers. Doing so would ensure that one is getting the best available coverage for the best price. One can also seek out discounts. For example, there are companies that offer discounts for memberships to specific organizations or one that offers discounts for bundling insurance coverages. If the monthly payment is an issue, a driver has the option of increasing his/her deductible and, in turn, decrease the monthly premium.

    There are multiple steps drivers in Texas can take to find affordable car insurance. The first step is to use the Internet to get quotes for their auto insurance. The next step is to use the network of professional friends to seek out professional insurance agents to provide them with quotes. Once the driver has shopped around, they can contact their current agent and see if they can work on their insurance rates.

    Talk to 2 or 3 acquaintances and ask them about their insurance company, whether they have filed a claim with them, what their experience was and whether they would recommend it or not. Try to pick friends, relatives or coworkers that drive the same type of car and preferably are in the same income level. Take notes of the type of car they drive, the approximate value of the car, approximate age, number of cars insured, number of drivers in policy, coverage, deductible, and how much they pay. This is to get an idea about how much you’ll end up paying. The more similarities you have with them, the more useful their info is to you. For every factor that is different, your premium will increase or decrease a few dollars. Once you have 2 or 3 references that you consider good (or acceptable), educate yourself about insurance coverages and options and decide the levels of protection you want and whether you’ll need any of the extra services. Then you’ll need to input your personal information and desired protection levels into those websites to get the quotes. Go with the lowest quote you get and pick the payment method you prefer. Companies typically offer a discount if you pay the whole premium when you sign up or give you the option to have monthly payments.

    Today, there a number of websites that let you compare auto insurance rates from the different companies based on your needs. Also, a number of insurance companies now have monitoring devices or smartphone apps that measure how your driving is, which could lead to discounts (of course, if you are a bad driver, your rate could go up).

    People should reach out to their friends and family to seek referrals/introductions to the insurance agents they use. We rely so heavily on personal reviews these days for almost everything we can seek feedback prior to a purchase, so why not entrust someone whom your closest family members and friends trust for their insurance policies? That might open your options up to a number of great local agents who want to act in your best interest because they are living and working in your community.

    While you're gathering quotes, you want to also seek independent agents who aren't captive to a single insurance provider for coverages. At times, this independence can help them shop several insurers to find you the best rates for your unique situations.

    Finally, you can turn to the online insurance quoting companies who pair you up with the insurance companies. We've seen a few of these created in recent years which provide several quotes in a single submission of your data. However, these are basing policy costs on what data you put into their metrics. I feel a stronger value in having an agent walk me and my clients through the various coverage details to determine areas in which we're underinsured, quality of coverage from insurers, and the personalized touch is always beneficial when you're chartering unknown territory, like the complexities of auto insurance coverage.

    Always shop around. Unless a company is frequently “showing” their appreciation, a consumer’s loyalty does not buy anything other than higher annual premiums. Of course, maintaining a clean driving record is beneficial as well. Life events should be shared with the insurance agent – job loss, pandemic restrictions (work-from-home), new child, etc. These may be taken into consideration for short-term premium reductions.

  3. How do regulations and rules in Texas impact insurance pricing and how consumers might shop for coverage?

    Texas requires that all drivers obtain a minimum amount of auto liability insurance to compensate the victims of an accident. As noted above, the minimum limits are $30,000 for an individual, $60,000 per accident and $25,000 for property damages. Unless you reject it, you will receive Personal Injury Coverage (PIP), which covers you and your passengers’ medical bills and some other losses. You also will receive uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage, which covers your injury and damage caused by a driver without sufficient insurance, unless you reject it. Both of these “optional” types of coverage are very good to have. In addition to PIP and Uninsured Motorist coverage, you should consider collision—which covers your car, and comprehensive—which protects you if your car is stolen or damaged by fire, flood, vandalism or something other than a collision. The bottom line, the state-required minimum coverage provides limited protection and you may want to shop around for a larger amount of coverage and additional protection. Another factor to consider is the amount of the deductible. Auto insurance deductibles apply to your recovery for each incident you cause and are not an annual amount. In general, the higher the deductible, the lower the cost for the policy, but the more you will have to pay in the case of an accident. When deciding what deductible is right for you, think about how much you can afford.

    The Texas Department of Insurance (TDI) adopted the Bill of Rights and requires all Texas drivers to carry bodily injury coverage of $30,000 per person and $60,000 per accident, plus property damage coverage of $25,000 per accident. This is called 30/60/25 coverage. Texans must also purchase personal injury protection coverage. An insurer or agent cannot require you to purchase liability limits greater than the minimum limits required by law or require you to purchase other types of coverage as a condition of offering or renewing insurance. You have the right to buy minimum liability, personal injury protection, and uninsured motorist insurance through the Texas Automobile Insurance Plan Association, also known as TAIPA, if you have been denied coverage by two insurance companies. You may have the right to pay your automobile insurance premium in installments. Insurance companies will charge a fee for each installment. An insurance company cannot deny you insurance solely on the basis of credit information. Insurers who use credit information must also consider other underwriting factors independent of credit information when deciding whether to offer coverage. You have the right to call TDI free of charge at 800-252-3439 or 512-463-6515 to learn more about your rights as an insurance consumer, mail at Mail Code Ill-IA. P. 0. Box 149091. Austin. TX 78714-9091. Or email at [email protected] To cancel your policy, your insurance company must mail notice at least ten days prior to cancellation. If you have questions or comments, contact the Office of Public Insurance Counsel (OPIC) at 1-877-611-6742, by mail at 333 Guadalupe. Suite 3-120. Austin, TX 78701. or visit the OPIC’s website.

    Some of these regulations have been addressed in previous questions, such as the ability for insurers in Texas to check drivers' credit scores and driving history (previous accidents, speeding tickets, etc.) and incorporate these aspects in their premium estimations. Other less known regulations in Texas impacting pricing include a driver's age and marital status. In general, older and married drivers tend to pay lower premiums when compared with younger drivers. Liability coverage insurance is required in Texas. So, when shopping for this type of insurance, drivers must pay attention to the policies being offered to avoid paying for coverage that may not be required or needed, such as collision or uninsured motorist coverages.


  • Dr. Mikhail Kouliavtsev
    Dr. Mikhail KouliavtsevDepartment Chair and Professor of Economics and Finance at Stephen F. Austin State University
    Richard Alderman
    Richard AldermanDirector, Consumer Law Center at the University of Houston, Professor Emeritus
    Dr. Daniel Perez Liston
    Dr. Daniel Perez ListonAssociate Professor of Finance at the University of St. Thomas-Houston
    Dr. Hwan Shin
    Dr. Hwan ShinAssociate Professor of Finance at The University of Texas at Tyler
    Frank G. Cabano
    Frank G. CabanoAssistant Professor, Marketing and Management at The University of Texas at El Paso
    Dr. Michael Kraten
    Dr. Michael KratenProfessor of Accounting at Houston Baptist University
  • Robin Grambling
    Robin GramblingSenior Lecturer Department of Marketing and Management at the University of Texas at El Paso
    Kim Austin
    Kim AustinState Farm Insurance Agent/Owner
    Yongli Luo
    Yongli LuoAssociate Professor of Finance at Houston Baptist University
    Mario Gonzalez-Fuentes
    Mario Gonzalez-FuentesAssociate Professor of Marketing at Trinity University
    Juan E. Gallardo
    Juan E. GallardoInstructor of Finance and Management at West Texas A&M University
    Jason Geesey
    Jason GeeseyAssociate Professor of Marketing at Wayland Baptist University
  • Xavier Garza-Gomez
    Xavier Garza-GomezProfessor of Finance at the University of Houston-Victoria
    Scott Wysong
    Scott WysongAssociate Professor & MBA Program Director in the Satish & Yasmin Gupta College of Business at the University of Dallas
     Ernest Jay Horn
    Ernest Jay HornLecturer — School of Family & Consumer Sciences at Texas State University
    Emilio M. D. López, Jr.
    Emilio M. D. López, Jr.Professor of Business at Dallas College
    J. Franklin Potts
    J. Franklin PottsAssociate Professor - Finance, Insurance & Real Estate at Baylor University
  • Dr. Mikhail Kouliavtsev
    Dr. Mikhail KouliavtsevDepartment Chair and Professor of Economics and Finance at Stephen F. Austin State University
    Richard Alderman
    Richard AldermanDirector, Consumer Law Center at the University of Houston, Professor Emeritus
    Dr. Daniel Perez Liston
    Dr. Daniel Perez ListonAssociate Professor of Finance at the University of St. Thomas-Houston
    Dr. Hwan Shin
    Dr. Hwan ShinAssociate Professor of Finance at The University of Texas at Tyler
    Frank G. Cabano
    Frank G. CabanoAssistant Professor, Marketing and Management at The University of Texas at El Paso
    Dr. Michael Kraten
    Dr. Michael KratenProfessor of Accounting at Houston Baptist University
  • Robin Grambling
    Robin GramblingSenior Lecturer Department of Marketing and Management at the University of Texas at El Paso
    Kim Austin
    Kim AustinState Farm Insurance Agent/Owner
    Yongli Luo
    Yongli LuoAssociate Professor of Finance at Houston Baptist University
    Mario Gonzalez-Fuentes
    Mario Gonzalez-FuentesAssociate Professor of Marketing at Trinity University
    Juan E. Gallardo
    Juan E. GallardoInstructor of Finance and Management at West Texas A&M University
    Jason Geesey
    Jason GeeseyAssociate Professor of Marketing at Wayland Baptist University
  • Xavier Garza-Gomez
    Xavier Garza-GomezProfessor of Finance at the University of Houston-Victoria
    Scott Wysong
    Scott WysongAssociate Professor & MBA Program Director in the Satish & Yasmin Gupta College of Business at the University of Dallas
     Ernest Jay Horn
    Ernest Jay HornLecturer — School of Family & Consumer Sciences at Texas State University
    Emilio M. D. López, Jr.
    Emilio M. D. López, Jr.Professor of Business at Dallas College
    J. Franklin Potts
    J. Franklin PottsAssociate Professor - Finance, Insurance & Real Estate at Baylor University
  • Dr. Mikhail Kouliavtsev
    Dr. Mikhail KouliavtsevDepartment Chair and Professor of Economics and Finance at Stephen F. Austin State University
    Richard Alderman
    Richard AldermanDirector, Consumer Law Center at the University of Houston, Professor Emeritus
    Dr. Daniel Perez Liston
    Dr. Daniel Perez ListonAssociate Professor of Finance at the University of St. Thomas-Houston
    Dr. Hwan Shin
    Dr. Hwan ShinAssociate Professor of Finance at The University of Texas at Tyler
    Frank G. Cabano
    Frank G. CabanoAssistant Professor, Marketing and Management at The University of Texas at El Paso
    Dr. Michael Kraten
    Dr. Michael KratenProfessor of Accounting at Houston Baptist University
  • Robin Grambling
    Robin GramblingSenior Lecturer Department of Marketing and Management at the University of Texas at El Paso
    Kim Austin
    Kim AustinState Farm Insurance Agent/Owner
    Yongli Luo
    Yongli LuoAssociate Professor of Finance at Houston Baptist University
    Mario Gonzalez-Fuentes
    Mario Gonzalez-FuentesAssociate Professor of Marketing at Trinity University
    Juan E. Gallardo
    Juan E. GallardoInstructor of Finance and Management at West Texas A&M University
    Jason Geesey
    Jason GeeseyAssociate Professor of Marketing at Wayland Baptist University
  • Xavier Garza-Gomez
    Xavier Garza-GomezProfessor of Finance at the University of Houston-Victoria
    Scott Wysong
    Scott WysongAssociate Professor & MBA Program Director in the Satish & Yasmin Gupta College of Business at the University of Dallas
     Ernest Jay Horn
    Ernest Jay HornLecturer — School of Family & Consumer Sciences at Texas State University
    Emilio M. D. López, Jr.
    Emilio M. D. López, Jr.Professor of Business at Dallas College
    J. Franklin Potts
    J. Franklin PottsAssociate Professor - Finance, Insurance & Real Estate at Baylor University
  • Dr. Mikhail Kouliavtsev
    Dr. Mikhail KouliavtsevDepartment Chair and Professor of Economics and Finance at Stephen F. Austin State University
    Richard Alderman
    Richard AldermanDirector, Consumer Law Center at the University of Houston, Professor Emeritus
    Dr. Daniel Perez Liston
    Dr. Daniel Perez ListonAssociate Professor of Finance at the University of St. Thomas-Houston
    Dr. Hwan Shin
    Dr. Hwan ShinAssociate Professor of Finance at The University of Texas at Tyler
    Frank G. Cabano
    Frank G. CabanoAssistant Professor, Marketing and Management at The University of Texas at El Paso
    Dr. Michael Kraten
    Dr. Michael KratenProfessor of Accounting at Houston Baptist University
  • Robin Grambling
    Robin GramblingSenior Lecturer Department of Marketing and Management at the University of Texas at El Paso
    Kim Austin
    Kim AustinState Farm Insurance Agent/Owner
    Yongli Luo
    Yongli LuoAssociate Professor of Finance at Houston Baptist University
    Mario Gonzalez-Fuentes
    Mario Gonzalez-FuentesAssociate Professor of Marketing at Trinity University
    Juan E. Gallardo
    Juan E. GallardoInstructor of Finance and Management at West Texas A&M University
    Jason Geesey
    Jason GeeseyAssociate Professor of Marketing at Wayland Baptist University
  • Xavier Garza-Gomez
    Xavier Garza-GomezProfessor of Finance at the University of Houston-Victoria
    Scott Wysong
    Scott WysongAssociate Professor & MBA Program Director in the Satish & Yasmin Gupta College of Business at the University of Dallas
     Ernest Jay Horn
    Ernest Jay HornLecturer — School of Family & Consumer Sciences at Texas State University
    Emilio M. D. López, Jr.
    Emilio M. D. López, Jr.Professor of Business at Dallas College
    J. Franklin Potts
    J. Franklin PottsAssociate Professor - Finance, Insurance & Real Estate at Baylor University
  • Dr. Mikhail Kouliavtsev
    Dr. Mikhail KouliavtsevDepartment Chair and Professor of Economics and Finance at Stephen F. Austin State University
    Richard Alderman
    Richard AldermanDirector, Consumer Law Center at the University of Houston, Professor Emeritus
    Dr. Daniel Perez Liston
    Dr. Daniel Perez ListonAssociate Professor of Finance at the University of St. Thomas-Houston
    Dr. Hwan Shin
    Dr. Hwan ShinAssociate Professor of Finance at The University of Texas at Tyler
    Frank G. Cabano
    Frank G. CabanoAssistant Professor, Marketing and Management at The University of Texas at El Paso
    Dr. Michael Kraten
    Dr. Michael KratenProfessor of Accounting at Houston Baptist University
  • Robin Grambling
    Robin GramblingSenior Lecturer Department of Marketing and Management at the University of Texas at El Paso
    Kim Austin
    Kim AustinState Farm Insurance Agent/Owner
    Yongli Luo
    Yongli LuoAssociate Professor of Finance at Houston Baptist University
    Mario Gonzalez-Fuentes
    Mario Gonzalez-FuentesAssociate Professor of Marketing at Trinity University
    Juan E. Gallardo
    Juan E. GallardoInstructor of Finance and Management at West Texas A&M University
    Jason Geesey
    Jason GeeseyAssociate Professor of Marketing at Wayland Baptist University
  • Xavier Garza-Gomez
    Xavier Garza-GomezProfessor of Finance at the University of Houston-Victoria
    Scott Wysong
    Scott WysongAssociate Professor & MBA Program Director in the Satish & Yasmin Gupta College of Business at the University of Dallas
     Ernest Jay Horn
    Ernest Jay HornLecturer — School of Family & Consumer Sciences at Texas State University
    Emilio M. D. López, Jr.
    Emilio M. D. López, Jr.Professor of Business at Dallas College
    J. Franklin Potts
    J. Franklin PottsAssociate Professor - Finance, Insurance & Real Estate at Baylor University
  • Dr. Mikhail Kouliavtsev
    Dr. Mikhail KouliavtsevDepartment Chair and Professor of Economics and Finance at Stephen F. Austin State University
    Richard Alderman
    Richard AldermanDirector, Consumer Law Center at the University of Houston, Professor Emeritus
    Dr. Daniel Perez Liston
    Dr. Daniel Perez ListonAssociate Professor of Finance at the University of St. Thomas-Houston
    Dr. Hwan Shin
    Dr. Hwan ShinAssociate Professor of Finance at The University of Texas at Tyler
    Frank G. Cabano
    Frank G. CabanoAssistant Professor, Marketing and Management at The University of Texas at El Paso
    Dr. Michael Kraten
    Dr. Michael KratenProfessor of Accounting at Houston Baptist University
  • Robin Grambling
    Robin GramblingSenior Lecturer Department of Marketing and Management at the University of Texas at El Paso
    Kim Austin
    Kim AustinState Farm Insurance Agent/Owner
    Yongli Luo
    Yongli LuoAssociate Professor of Finance at Houston Baptist University
    Mario Gonzalez-Fuentes
    Mario Gonzalez-FuentesAssociate Professor of Marketing at Trinity University
    Juan E. Gallardo
    Juan E. GallardoInstructor of Finance and Management at West Texas A&M University
    Jason Geesey
    Jason GeeseyAssociate Professor of Marketing at Wayland Baptist University
  • Xavier Garza-Gomez
    Xavier Garza-GomezProfessor of Finance at the University of Houston-Victoria
    Scott Wysong
    Scott WysongAssociate Professor & MBA Program Director in the Satish & Yasmin Gupta College of Business at the University of Dallas
     Ernest Jay Horn
    Ernest Jay HornLecturer — School of Family & Consumer Sciences at Texas State University
    Emilio M. D. López, Jr.
    Emilio M. D. López, Jr.Professor of Business at Dallas College
    J. Franklin Potts
    J. Franklin PottsAssociate Professor - Finance, Insurance & Real Estate at Baylor University
  • Dr. Mikhail Kouliavtsev
    Dr. Mikhail KouliavtsevDepartment Chair and Professor of Economics and Finance at Stephen F. Austin State University
    Richard Alderman
    Richard AldermanDirector, Consumer Law Center at the University of Houston, Professor Emeritus
    Dr. Daniel Perez Liston
    Dr. Daniel Perez ListonAssociate Professor of Finance at the University of St. Thomas-Houston
    Dr. Hwan Shin
    Dr. Hwan ShinAssociate Professor of Finance at The University of Texas at Tyler
    Frank G. Cabano
    Frank G. CabanoAssistant Professor, Marketing and Management at The University of Texas at El Paso
    Dr. Michael Kraten
    Dr. Michael KratenProfessor of Accounting at Houston Baptist University
  • Robin Grambling
    Robin GramblingSenior Lecturer Department of Marketing and Management at the University of Texas at El Paso
    Kim Austin
    Kim AustinState Farm Insurance Agent/Owner
    Yongli Luo
    Yongli LuoAssociate Professor of Finance at Houston Baptist University
    Mario Gonzalez-Fuentes
    Mario Gonzalez-FuentesAssociate Professor of Marketing at Trinity University
    Juan E. Gallardo
    Juan E. GallardoInstructor of Finance and Management at West Texas A&M University
    Jason Geesey
    Jason GeeseyAssociate Professor of Marketing at Wayland Baptist University
  • Xavier Garza-Gomez
    Xavier Garza-GomezProfessor of Finance at the University of Houston-Victoria
    Scott Wysong
    Scott WysongAssociate Professor & MBA Program Director in the Satish & Yasmin Gupta College of Business at the University of Dallas
     Ernest Jay Horn
    Ernest Jay HornLecturer — School of Family & Consumer Sciences at Texas State University
    Emilio M. D. López, Jr.
    Emilio M. D. López, Jr.Professor of Business at Dallas College
    J. Franklin Potts
    J. Franklin PottsAssociate Professor - Finance, Insurance & Real Estate at Baylor University

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About the Author


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Jason Van Steenwyk is an experienced financial industry reporter and writer. He is a former staff reporter for Mutual Funds, and has been published in SeekingAlpha, Nasdaq.com, RealEstate.com, WealthManagement.com, Senior Market Advisor, Life and Health Pro and many other outlets over the past two decades. He is also an avid fiddle player and guitarist. He lives in Orlando, Fla.


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