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  • Dr. James Barth
    Dr. James Barth

Cheapest Car Insurance Companies and Quotes in Florida

Many unique personal factors affect which company could provide the most affordable car insurance in Florida for you. MoneyGeek ranked the cheapest auto insurance companies in Florida based on comprehensive and collision coverage for an average driver. If you want a clearer idea about how much you will have to pay, you can compare quotes and average premiums from several providers.

Average Comprehensive and Collision Rates in Florida

It is important to understand that these costs are the typical rates for an average driver. Different carriers calculate premiums differently. Some view profiles with DUIs or tickets to be more of a risk, while some offer discounts for people with clean driving records. It’s a good idea to look around to find a policy that best matches your needs.

Compare Auto Insurance Rates

Ensure you're getting the best rate for your auto insurance. Compare quotes from the top insurance companies.

Insurance Rates

Cheapest Liability Car Insurance in Florida

Florida is a no-fault state, which means you do not legally need to have bodily injury liability insurance. However, all residents who own a vehicle with at least four wheels still need to meet the state’s minimum insurance requirements. You will need at least $10,000 in personal injury protection (PIP) coverage and $10,000 of property damage liability (PDL) coverage. GEICO offers the most affordable option for most drivers, with an average annual premium of $590 for the state minimum. It also provides the most affordable policy for 50/100/50 coverage, which costs an average of $861 per year.

Average Cost for Liability Coverage

The Best Car Insurance Companies in Florida for 2021

MoneyGeek used several factors — including affordability, customer satisfaction, financial strength and the ability to pay claims — to determine the best car insurance companies in Florida.

To accomplish this, MoneyGeek used information from AM Best’s financial strength ratings and J.D. Power’s U.S. Auto Insurance Study, two industry standards for rating and reviewing insurance companies. Each study has equal weight in MoneyGeek’s final rating out of 100, as do other factors like overall affordability.

Expand All Rankings +

1

USAAScore: 100
+

5/5

User Satisfaction

5/5

Claims Ratings

5/5

Affordability

A++

Financial Stability

2

EsuranceScore: 95
+

5/5

User Satisfaction

4/5

Claims Ratings

5/5

Affordability

A+

Financial Stability

3

GEICOScore: 85
+

3/5

User Satisfaction

3/5

Claims Ratings

3/5

Affordability

A++

Financial Stability

4

TravelersScore: 85
+

2/5

User Satisfaction

4/5

Claims Ratings

3/5

Affordability

A++

Financial Stability

5

MetLifeScore: 82.5
+

2/5

User Satisfaction

4/5

Claims Ratings

3/5

Affordability

A+

Financial Stability

6

HartfordScore: 82.5
+

2/5

User Satisfaction

5/5

Claims Ratings

2/5

Affordability

A+

Financial Stability

7

Liberty MutualScore: 80
+

3/5

User Satisfaction

3/5

Claims Ratings

3/5

Affordability

A

Financial Stability

8

Auto-Owners Insurance CoScore: 80
+

2/5

User Satisfaction

2/5

Claims Ratings

3/5

Affordability

A++

Financial Stability

9

State FarmScore: 77.5
+

3/5

User Satisfaction

3/5

Claims Ratings

3/5

Affordability

A-

Financial Stability

10

NationwideScore: 77.5
+

2/5

User Satisfaction

2/5

Claims Ratings

3/5

Affordability

A+

Financial Stability

While USAA scores highly in many areas, this provider is only available to military members, veterans and their families.

Market Share by Company

The National Association of Insurance Commissioners identified GEICO as the largest insurance provider in the state. The following table looks at the largest Florida auto insurance companies. Purchasing insurance from a large, established company can offer local agents and reassurance if you're involved in an accident.

Compare Auto Insurance Rates

Ensure you're getting the best rate for your auto insurance. Compare quotes from the top insurance companies.

Insurance Rates

What Is the Average Cost of Car Insurance in Florida?

Various factors can influence car insurance premiums. To demonstrate a typical case, MoneyGeek calculated the average rates for 100/300/100 comprehensive and collision insurance for a typical 40-year-old male driving a Toyota Camry with a clean record. Your age, location, driving history and coverage level all play a part in determining your rates, which can be markedly higher or lower than these averages.

  • Average Driver: $2,208
  • DUI: $3,763
  • Speeding Ticket: $2,902
  • Poor Credit Score: $4,371
  • Seniors: $2,325
  • Students: $5,001

Cheapest Car Insurance for Drivers With a DUI in Florida

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), there were 7,573 car crashes in Florida involving a drunk driver between 2009 and 2018, a rate higher than the national average. Florida imposes strict penalties for people convicted of driving under the influence. Such penalties include jail time, fines and fees, license suspension and a mandatory ignition interlock device — not to mention increased auto insurance rates. If you have a DUI on your record in Florida, it's important to maintain safe driving habits and shop around for auto coverage to find the lowest rates.

Average Car Insurance Rates With a DUI

Florida maintains one of the strictest DUI laws in the country. People found guilty of driving under the influence can have the DUI remain visible in their records for 75 years. Individuals with a DUI should contact many different insurance agencies to find the best rate. While there are long-term costs of a DUI, you can work to improve your driving record over time to lower costs.

Cheapest Car Insurance With Tickets in Florida

Whether using a cellphone, fishing for items in your car or fiddling with the radio, distracted driving can cause real consequences. The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles uses a points-based system for penalized drivers. Those who get tickets may incur points on their driving record, causing their auto insurance rate to increase.

Average Car Insurance Rates With a Ticket

Distracted driving can be costly, resulting in not only more expensive auto insurance rates, but also higher rates of reckless driving and crashes. The amount your insurance premium rises depends on the severity of your infraction and the number of points on your record. Those who get more than 12 points in a year, for example, receive a 30-day suspension. If you have points on your license, seek out several car insurance quotes to find the best rate for you.

Cheapest Car Insurance Companies in Florida for Drivers With Bad Credit

Florida ranks 37th in the nation regarding credit scores, with an average credit score of 694. According to Experian, any credit score below 670 is considered a bad one. If your score sits below this number, you may incur higher insurance premiums. While a poor credit score does not automatically mean you won’t pay your bill, it may signal to insurance providers that you could carry substantial debt or have been unable to make regular payments on other expenses in the past. Compare car insurance companies and premiums to find the best price with your credit score.

Average Car Insurance Rates for Drivers With Bad Credit

Even though a less-than-ideal credit score can impact your insurance premium, there are many ways to improve your credit score. Changes won’t happen overnight, but positive changes can happen over time.

Cheapest Car Insurance Companies in Florida for Seniors

Even if seniors possess a perfect driving record, they may sometimes see their auto insurance premiums rise over time – especially if they don’t have the right coverage for their current age group. Drivers ages 65 and older accounted for 15.4% of all fatal Florida crashes in 2017, causing Florida insurance agencies to carefully consider how to best insure this demographic. While insurance costs may increase with age, comparing car insurance companies and rates can help you find competitive premiums and discounts.

Average Car Insurance Rates for Seniors

Factors that may reduce the chance of finding cheap car insurance for seniors in Florida include their age, how much they drive, the type of car they own and if they possess a clean driving record. You can find ways to protect yourself and others on the road, but it may take a bit of extra research to find the best rates, especially for senior drivers.

Cheapest Car Insurance for Students in Florida

Florida allows for talking on a cell phone while driving and does not limit the number of passengers new drivers can have in their vehicle with them. Cathy Chase, vice president of governmental affairs at Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, finds these facts troubling. "Teen drivers are far more likely to be involved in fatal crashes because they lack driving experience and tend to take greater risks," Chase said.

If you have a teen, you already know that he or she is expensive to insure. Your teenager can help maintain cheap car insurance rates by keeping a clean driving record and by avoiding accidents and moving violations. You can also check to see if your insurance company offers discounts for good grades or for the completion of a driver safety course.

Florida residents attending college out of state must maintain personal injury protection and property damage insurance on their vehicle if it has been in the state for more than 90 days at any point during the previous year.

If you’re insuring your child's car while they’re away at school, you may want to warn them not to lend the car to their friends. You could be liable if there is an accident. Consult with your insurance company for specific details.

More than 815,000 drivers under the age of 20 currently hold Florida licenses. Of that amount, 36,216 were involved in crashes as a driver during 2018. Even the best high school and college-age drivers simply have not been behind the wheel long enough to anticipate everything that can happen while driving. Because of this factor, their auto insurance rates are typically higher. Approximate estimates are given below, but you can ask for personalized quotes to get more accurate figures.

Average Car Insurance Rates for Students

Insurance Rate Information for Military Drivers and Veterans

Florida is home to nearly 140,000 active, reserve and civilian members of the military. If you are deployed outside the state and won't be driving your car, contact your insurance company to discuss options. Florida law requires insurance on all registered vehicles, even if they are not currently being driven. Insurers may offer to discount your premiums. USAA, for example, offers deep discounts to members who store their vehicles on a military installation.

If you can prove your deployment and that you did not drive any civilian vehicles during that time, you may be able to temporarily cancel your registration and insurance and reinstate it when you return with no penalty.

If you’re an honorably discharged, disabled veteran with a valid disabled veteran ID card, you are exempt from Florida vehicle licensing and registration fees.

Average Rates for Florida service members

male
25 years$1,581
50 years$1,331
female
25 years$1,537
50 years$1,325

Car Insurance in Florida: What You Need to Know

All vehicles with a valid Florida registration must have insurance coverage. Even "snowbirds" need Florida vehicle insurance if visiting the state for more than 90 days per year.

Proof of Insurance in Florida

Insurance ID cards must be carried in your car at all times and shown to police when requested or after an accident. If you don’t comply, the police may issue you a ticket for lacking proof of insurance.

The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles requires insurance companies to electronically report all new or canceled personal injury protection policies. If your insurance company notifies the department that you canceled your policy and haven’t activated a new one, the department will send a notice requiring new insurance information.

If you’re unable to prove that you replaced the insurance without a lapse in coverage, you must pay a reinstatement fee of $150 for the first offense. If you can't provide proof of insurance, your driver's license and license plate(s) will be suspended for up to three years.

Minimum Liability Insurance Requirements in Florida

Everyone who drives a vehicle in Florida must have at least these minimum levels of coverage:

  • $10,000 Personal Injury Protection (PIP)
  • $10,000 Property Damage Liability (PDL)

Alternatives to Insurance in Florida

Florida residents have a few alternatives to buying insurance, but they are more difficult and require additional upfront resources. You can fulfill your financial responsibility obligation by:

  • Posting a surety bond
  • Depositing cash or securities with DHSMV
  • Providing the DHSMV with evidence that you have sufficient capital and are self-insuring your vehicle

How Much Coverage Do You Need in Florida?

Although you are only required to purchase $10,000 in personal injury protection and $10,000 in property damage liability, experts at the Insurance Information Institute warn that such low levels of coverage are risky because you may wind up having to pay a lot of money out of pocket if you are sued. Experts recommend getting liability insurance of at least $100,000 per injury and $300,000 per accident.

If you own a valuable car, you may want to look into collision and comprehensive insurance. Collision covers car accidents and collisions with objects like trees or telephone poles, while comprehensive insurance pays for non-traffic damages caused by fire, theft and natural disasters, like floods and hurricanes.

Given the high rate of uninsured drivers in Florida, you may also want to consider purchasing uninsured motorist protection.

Car insurance companies use your location to calculate your rate.
Explore average rates for your city.

Expert Advice on Finding Cheap Car Insurance in Florida

To help you find credible and accurate insight on car insurance in Florida, MoneyGeek received expert advice from trusted professionals. The perspectives and opinions expressed are those of the individual contributor.

  1. What are the key factors drivers in Florida should look for when searching for the best auto insurance coverage?

    Drivers must consider the unique characteristics of the area where they live. Some areas are more densely populated and are more accident-prone, for example. If you drive on the highway frequently, you want to make sure you are covered for highway assistance or collision assistance.

    First, it is important to get insurance from a well-established, reliable company. Then, I would suggest drivers in Florida increase their coverage if their budget allows for it since Florida ranks high among the States with the worse driving statistics in the US.

    Because so many drivers in Florida are uninsured, I would strongly recommend insurance that covers the standard collision but also uninsured motorists.

    It depends on what you consider to be “the best” auto insurance coverage. For many people, an insurance contract is merely a financial contract (after all, it is a legal contract about cash flows), so the decision revolves around price. Keep in mind the cash flows on the other end.

    After a claim, coverage differs in payments and service. How will your payment be processed? How much paperwork is involved? How long will it take? Is there 24-hour assistance? Will you get a rental car? Research online to determine if the insurer is associated with a reputable chain of repair facilities—or will they cut costs with low-ball appraisals or extra charges for repairs?

    How else do you find this information? Well, do you buy your insurance from an agent or a broker or on a website? Agents work for specific insurers and have close relationships with their firms. Brokers are independent and are known to shop around more. They may differ in the way they handle claims; some will process your claims for you. Ask yourself: Do you need to minimize stress after a mishap or are you cool and calm and willing to do some of the legwork yourself? For those who value digital convenience, many insurers have Websites to help you process claims on your phone. For others, this is unacceptably impersonal. Determine the best policy for you by considering what happens on both ends of the contract.

    Most folks want to spend as little as possible on their auto insurance. This makes planning sense, as resources not needed for insurance coverage may be spent or saved elsewhere in their budget. However, it is vital to first determine the driver’s appropriate level of coverage and use that same standard of coverage when judging the value of different companies’ insurance rates. Also, it is imperative that the auto policy’s exclusions of coverage are known. This is especially true with the emergence of a heightened delivery service industry, wherein employees may be encouraged to use their own cars. A “livery” exclusion generally prohibits the use of the individual’s car for transporting for business purposes. Suppose a laid off worker were to temporarily begin delivering food in their own car. If that driver were in a collision whilst driving to a customer’s home, not only would their insurance company likely deny the claim because of a undisclosed business use of the vehicle, if the driver injured another person or damaged another’s property—that second party would likely have to file a claim on their “uninsured motorist” coverage.

    Insurer's reputation, ratings and the level of reserves are important, but it's also important to understand that good quality does come with a price. However, there are insurers who manage their portfolio well and keep their margins low to attract good customers. Drivers should inquire about the pricing and coverages and compare them across multiple insurers before finalizing their choice.

    Florida provides a unique challenge for insurance (home or auto). Policies tend to be more expensive due to conditions in the state. However, affordability cannot be the only selection criteria! Check the reputation of various providers under consideration on multiple consumer protection venues. Ensure they meet expectations for customer service, claims settlement, speed, providing information, etc. In Florida, give serious consideration toward “Uninsured Motorist” insurance, which provides coverage for an accident caused by another driver who is not covered by a policy. Also, know that some large, well-known insurance companies utilize smaller companies to insure motorists in this state. These subcontractors have various levels of capabilities, but theoretically are backed by the larger company. It is not uncommon for providers to provide a low rate, which increases substantially each year thereafter until it is no longer competitive.

    Auto insurance coverage should be affordable, but importantly, it should pay out when needed. Check the ratings of an insurance company when deciding whether to purchase from them. Consumer Reports will often rate auto (and home owners) insurance companies, and they are a thorough, independent source of information. If a student is still part of a parent’s household, it may be cheapest to add the student’s auto insurance to the parent’s existing policy. Every few years though, the insurance prices should be shopped again, because insurance companies have been known to charge long-term, existing customers more than new ones for similar policies. Also ensure that there’s enough coverage for the insured’s individual financial situation. A family with few assets and limited means may want the minimum amount of insurance coverage as set by the state, whereas someone with more assets may want enhanced coverage, and perhaps even an umbrella insurance policy.

    In addition to affordability (which I discuss below) look for reputable insurance companies that have a positive reputation. Do your research on customer responsiveness, consumer reports, and complaints. Find out about their billing practices, claim processes (in the unfortunate event that you would need this), and how personal the service is.

    In some states you can simply go online and find a low-cost auto insurance provider. However, in Florida, you are required to work with a Florida-licensed agent. When searching for the best auto insurance coverage, it is tempting to consider the monthly cost as the most important deciding factor. However, one should consider the total cost of the insurance policy. There are two levels of coverage: Collision and Comprehensive. These work together to provide 360-degree coverage. If the car is fully paid for, is the replacement cost of the vehicle high enough to justify purchasing full coverage (Collision AND Comprehensive coverage)? Additionally, is the individual disciplined enough to set aside money into an emergency fund should something occur that would be covered by Comprehensive coverage? Know what you need, or ask for details from different licensed auto insurance agents.

    When searching for the best auto rate possible, drivers can:

    • Shop around for the best rates and coverage
    • Before you buy, compare costs
    • Ask for higher deductibles (This can save you a lot of money over the course of your policy)
    • Reduce coverage of older cars
    • Shop around for low mileage discounts
    • Combine insurance policies, if possible
    • Maintain good credit and driving records
    • Take a defensive driving course to reduce higher premiums

    Due to the “no-fault” law in Florida, each driver must carry Personal Injury Protection (PIP) coverage. Therefore, buyers have to make sure that PIP is included in their policy when doing comparison shopping. The State of Florida also requires that each driver carries Property Damage Liability (PDL). The policy must have a minimum of $10,000 in PIP and a minimum of $10,000 in PDL. Drivers should look into the reputation of the company and confirm they have a good track record of paying claims. Drivers are required to have auto insurance in Florida.

  2. What steps can drivers in Florida take to find affordable car insurance?

    Florida drivers should ask around. Social media apps like "Nextdoor" and "Facebook" facilitate asking others for recommendations.

    Currently, most, if not all, big insurance companies provide quotes over the internet. The best strategy is to sit in front of the computer and shop.

    Shop around—and do it often. Pricing models differ across companies based on the statistical methods they use and the experience they have had with drivers. You might find a company that has had fewer accidents with drivers similar to you.

    Over the long term, insurance markets alternate between what are called “soft” and “hard” insurance markets. In a soft market, insurers adopt looser underwriting standards and set lower premiums. This usually takes place when insurers are more profitable. In a hard market, insurers raise their premiums and are choosy about the policies they will underwrite. This is especially important in Florida because many insurers offer many different kinds of property insurance. After a large storm, insurance payouts will rise and this might induce a harder market as firms take more defensive positions in other risks to compensate. For example, a recent Insurance Journal article describes how several insurers are closing operations in Florida. While this is mainly true in the property insurance market, it can mean a tighter market for other types of insurance. This shows that it is more important to shop for coverage over time in Florida because the broader insurance market in Florida is subject to shocks from storm activity.

    It is also a good idea shop around over time because you become a more appealing customer as you gain experience. Consider scheduling an insurance “check-up” on your 6-month or annual anniversaries of claim-free coverage—unlike the dentist, this check-up might relieve some pain.

    After identifying the appropriate type and level of insurance needed, as well as whether to get a higher deductible for a lower premium—a true comparison may be possible. Online insurance quotes may be dependent upon how well the computer user can keep all of these things in mind. Alternatively, financial planners usually recommend their clients consider using multi-line insurance agents. Often, those companies can bundle auto insurance with homeowners insurance or renters insurance and other property and casualty insurance. Such agents may also remind folks they may need to keep a minimum level of automobile insurance coverage to permit them to acquire or maintain a Personal Liability Umbrella Policy. While no one wants to overspend on auto insurance, drivers should keep in mind that saving funds by being underinsured, inadequately or incorrectly insured could become far more costly. Besides, the person most likely to file a claim on one’s auto insurance is the insured. Properly selected auto insurance coverage yields peace of mind.

    More research and comparison.

    When Florida drivers are looking for the best insurance quotes, they should first determine the level of insurance they need to feel covered. Drivers should ensure they have the level of coverage and deductibles that meet their needs. Then, they should take the time to get quotes from multiple insurance companies on the same levels of coverage. If the driver is still deciding on the vehicle to drive, they can also quote multiple vehicles to make an informed choice on the coverage costs for each vehicle under consideration. There are many great sources for insurance quotes, most insurance companies have an online quote system which allows drivers to enter a limited amount of information and get an instant, no-commitment quote. There are also several aggregators that can search through multiple insurance companies simultaneously, which may help save some time.

    • Determine if an online relationship is sufficient, or if an agent available in-person is desired (likely at a higher cost).
    • List the services that are important (mobile app availability/capability, mobile claims service, real-time chat, etc.)
    • Identify reputable companies providing the desired services in the area.
    • Determine the level of coverage desired. States have minimum levels of coverage required by law, but some are not sufficient to cover the insured after a severe accident.
    • Get quotes on equal policies from all providers under consideration.
    • Initiate the policy and arrange the payment structure in the most financially advantageous method possible.
    • Ensure that the policy premiums do not change an unreasonable amount over the lifetime of the policy, particularly after the first period expires (annual or 6-month).

    Do the homework on both cost and reliability. There are online sites that can help. After narrowing down the insurance company to a few based on price, check the ratings and read the reviews focusing on those who had claims. How easy was the insurance company to deal with during a stressful time immediately after a claim? Did the claim payout fairly and timely?

    It takes time and patience, but an individual driver can customize their insurance needs and do a cost-benefit analysis to determine what policy limits are best and what insurer provides exactly what they need. Once you know your preferred limits, start your research.

    Start by getting multiple quotes. This takes time and patience. Make a comparative assessment, using the same levels of coverage, deductible amounts, and discounts to be sure you are getting useful information. Of course, you can save time and have a broker do this, but you may not be able to ask all of the necessary questions and get a feel for customer engagement. A broker might also charge a small fee, but may find a better deal. Here are some things to consider and compare:

    • Collision coverage
    • Bodily Injury coverage
    • Deductibles (the higher the deductible, the lower the premium)
    • Towing coverage
    • Uninsured motorist (just in case someone without insurance does damage to your vehicle)
    • Rental Car Coverage in the event of loss of use.
    • Comprehensive (if there is damage to your car and you were not in an accident)

    Don’t forget these important discounts:

    • Safe driver
    • Accident-Free
    • Low Mileage
    • Homeowner
    • Multi-policies (group together car with rental insurance, homeowner’s insurance, or other policies)
    • Age
    • Good Credit Report
    • Good Student (one more reason to get those A’s)
    • Discounts for driver’s education
    • Vehicle safety discounts (theft control, anti-brake, anti-lock, lane assist, camera, etc.)

    Shop around and get at least three quotes from a mix of reputable firms. When comparing coverage, share what you have with a licensed agent and request something similar or better. After receiving the quote, ask the agent to go through each offering with you until you are comfortable with the details. Look at the cost for deductibles and overlapping coverage: if you have AAA, you already have roadside coverage and therefore won't need it on the insurance policy. Ask how the monthly or full-term price changes when the deductible changes. Changing your deductible from $1000 to $500 may result in only a $5 to $20 difference over the yearly policy cost. It may be a small price to pay now so that you don’t need to deplete emergency funds should an accident occur. Finally, consider the hidden cost of paying monthly. Paying monthly often includes additional costs as high as 10% to 20% of the overall policy price. If you can, pay for the policy upfront (6 months or 1 year at a time) to save $100 or more on the policy.

    • Consider the uniqueness of the area where you live. For example, if you do a lot of highway driving, you will want to make sure that you are covered for highway assistance and collision assistance.

    • Check Florida government websites, such as: https://www.floir.com/, https://www.fdacs.gov/Divisions-Offices/Consumer-Services to check on the insurance companies you might be considering

    • Ask around! Check social media apps, including “Nextdoor” and “Facebook” Also, ask friends, neighbors, and colleagues for recommendations.

    The steps would be similar to finding it in other states, comparison shopping. Just need to make sure that you compare apples to apples, for example, making sure that the coverages are the same and the level of coverage are the same.

  3. How do regulations and rules in Florida impact insurance pricing and how consumers might shop for coverage?

    Florida’s state government fosters a vicious circle: They make a lot of money—more than $1 billion/year, according to Forbes—collecting fines related to driving and licenses. Drivers’ inability to pay these fines leads to suspended licenses, which then causes insurance companies to stop coverage. But these folks can’t stop driving, or else they can’t get to work. As a result, Florida has a massive number of people driving without insurance and/or suspended licenses. That makes driving in Florida riskier for everyone, and drives up insurance prices for all of us. So, driving in Florida becomes even more expensive, and the cycle continues.

    Florida requires low minimum coverage levels: only $10,000 to cover property damage and personal injury protection. Many drivers take this a step further because Florida leads the nation in the number of uninsured drivers; Car and Driver reported that one in four drivers operates a vehicle without enough insurance.

    While this policy offers more freedom of choice, it can cost all drivers. After an accident with an under-insured driver, your insurance company will have to cover the unpaid expenses. This cuts two ways: sometimes your insurer steps in for the other driver (more claim events), and there may be additional items on a single claim (more expensive claims). Florida drivers should resist the temptation to sacrifice this type of coverage to save a few dollars.

    Florida also requires continuous coverage to maintain valid license plates. In most states, insurance premiums are higher for drivers with gaps in their coverage. This is especially important in Florida since the penalty for not having coverage can be license suspension, which damages your driving record. This restriction does place the buyer in a better bargaining position: You can always keep your current policy while you shop around. Insurance premiums vary over time and between companies, so check periodically for quotes.

    Finally, the road system is different. Florida has one of the higher maximum speed limits and the severity of accidents increase with speed. On the other hand, Florida also has a large toll system, which finances high-quality roads. A better quality surface, stretching across more lanes, means a less congested and more orderly flow of traffic.

    When you shop, think honestly about your own driving style: Do your passengers feel like they’re on the carousel at Magic Kingdom or the Daytona 500 speedway? If it is the former and you stay off the highways, you can get away with lower coverage. If you find yourself taking risks on the road, you are better off doubling down on insurance.


  • Dr. Alexandra Aguirre-Rodriguez
    Dr. Alexandra Aguirre-RodriguezAssociate Professor Department of Marketing & Logistics at Florida International University
    Alex Horenstein
    Alex HorensteinAssistant Professor of Economics at the University of Miami Herbert Business School
    Dr. Amanda J. Phalin
    Dr. Amanda J. PhalinSenior Lecturer, Warrington College of Business at the University of Florida
    Lealand Morin
    Lealand MorinAssistant Professor of Economics at the University of Central Florida
    Dr. Robert W. Tiller
    Dr. Robert W. TillerDirector of the University of South Florida's Financial Planning & Wealth Management Program
    Dr. Arun Upadhyay
    Dr. Arun UpadhyayAssociate Professor - Department of Finance at Florida International University
  • Jeffrey Brown
    Jeffrey BrownProfessor of Finance at Johnson University
    Valrie Chambers
    Valrie ChambersAssociate Professor of Accounting at Stetson University
    Barbara VanderWerf
    Barbara VanderWerfAssistant Professor of Business and Management at Palm Beach Atlantic University
    Dena Hale
    Dena HaleAssistant Professor of Sales & Marketing at Stetson University
    Dr. Andrew Burnstine
    Dr. Andrew BurnstineAssociate Professor of Marketing at Lynn University
    Dr. Rawi Naranong
    Dr. Rawi NaranongProfessor at the School of Applied Business at Daytona State College
  • James Farrell
    James FarrellAssociate Professor of Finance and Economics at Florida Southern College
  • Dr. Alexandra Aguirre-Rodriguez
    Dr. Alexandra Aguirre-RodriguezAssociate Professor Department of Marketing & Logistics at Florida International University
    Alex Horenstein
    Alex HorensteinAssistant Professor of Economics at the University of Miami Herbert Business School
    Dr. Amanda J. Phalin
    Dr. Amanda J. PhalinSenior Lecturer, Warrington College of Business at the University of Florida
    Lealand Morin
    Lealand MorinAssistant Professor of Economics at the University of Central Florida
    Dr. Robert W. Tiller
    Dr. Robert W. TillerDirector of the University of South Florida's Financial Planning & Wealth Management Program
    Dr. Arun Upadhyay
    Dr. Arun UpadhyayAssociate Professor - Department of Finance at Florida International University
  • Jeffrey Brown
    Jeffrey BrownProfessor of Finance at Johnson University
    Valrie Chambers
    Valrie ChambersAssociate Professor of Accounting at Stetson University
    Barbara VanderWerf
    Barbara VanderWerfAssistant Professor of Business and Management at Palm Beach Atlantic University
    Dena Hale
    Dena HaleAssistant Professor of Sales & Marketing at Stetson University
    Dr. Andrew Burnstine
    Dr. Andrew BurnstineAssociate Professor of Marketing at Lynn University
    Dr. Rawi Naranong
    Dr. Rawi NaranongProfessor at the School of Applied Business at Daytona State College
  • James Farrell
    James FarrellAssociate Professor of Finance and Economics at Florida Southern College
  • Dr. Alexandra Aguirre-Rodriguez
    Dr. Alexandra Aguirre-RodriguezAssociate Professor Department of Marketing & Logistics at Florida International University
    Alex Horenstein
    Alex HorensteinAssistant Professor of Economics at the University of Miami Herbert Business School
    Dr. Amanda J. Phalin
    Dr. Amanda J. PhalinSenior Lecturer, Warrington College of Business at the University of Florida
    Lealand Morin
    Lealand MorinAssistant Professor of Economics at the University of Central Florida
    Dr. Robert W. Tiller
    Dr. Robert W. TillerDirector of the University of South Florida's Financial Planning & Wealth Management Program
    Dr. Arun Upadhyay
    Dr. Arun UpadhyayAssociate Professor - Department of Finance at Florida International University
  • Jeffrey Brown
    Jeffrey BrownProfessor of Finance at Johnson University
    Valrie Chambers
    Valrie ChambersAssociate Professor of Accounting at Stetson University
    Barbara VanderWerf
    Barbara VanderWerfAssistant Professor of Business and Management at Palm Beach Atlantic University
    Dena Hale
    Dena HaleAssistant Professor of Sales & Marketing at Stetson University
    Dr. Andrew Burnstine
    Dr. Andrew BurnstineAssociate Professor of Marketing at Lynn University
    Dr. Rawi Naranong
    Dr. Rawi NaranongProfessor at the School of Applied Business at Daytona State College
  • James Farrell
    James FarrellAssociate Professor of Finance and Economics at Florida Southern College
  • Dr. Alexandra Aguirre-Rodriguez
    Dr. Alexandra Aguirre-RodriguezAssociate Professor Department of Marketing & Logistics at Florida International University
    Alex Horenstein
    Alex HorensteinAssistant Professor of Economics at the University of Miami Herbert Business School
    Dr. Amanda J. Phalin
    Dr. Amanda J. PhalinSenior Lecturer, Warrington College of Business at the University of Florida
    Lealand Morin
    Lealand MorinAssistant Professor of Economics at the University of Central Florida
    Dr. Robert W. Tiller
    Dr. Robert W. TillerDirector of the University of South Florida's Financial Planning & Wealth Management Program
    Dr. Arun Upadhyay
    Dr. Arun UpadhyayAssociate Professor - Department of Finance at Florida International University
  • Jeffrey Brown
    Jeffrey BrownProfessor of Finance at Johnson University
    Valrie Chambers
    Valrie ChambersAssociate Professor of Accounting at Stetson University
    Barbara VanderWerf
    Barbara VanderWerfAssistant Professor of Business and Management at Palm Beach Atlantic University
    Dena Hale
    Dena HaleAssistant Professor of Sales & Marketing at Stetson University
    Dr. Andrew Burnstine
    Dr. Andrew BurnstineAssociate Professor of Marketing at Lynn University
    Dr. Rawi Naranong
    Dr. Rawi NaranongProfessor at the School of Applied Business at Daytona State College
  • James Farrell
    James FarrellAssociate Professor of Finance and Economics at Florida Southern College
  • Dr. Alexandra Aguirre-Rodriguez
    Dr. Alexandra Aguirre-RodriguezAssociate Professor Department of Marketing & Logistics at Florida International University
    Alex Horenstein
    Alex HorensteinAssistant Professor of Economics at the University of Miami Herbert Business School
    Dr. Amanda J. Phalin
    Dr. Amanda J. PhalinSenior Lecturer, Warrington College of Business at the University of Florida
    Lealand Morin
    Lealand MorinAssistant Professor of Economics at the University of Central Florida
    Dr. Robert W. Tiller
    Dr. Robert W. TillerDirector of the University of South Florida's Financial Planning & Wealth Management Program
    Dr. Arun Upadhyay
    Dr. Arun UpadhyayAssociate Professor - Department of Finance at Florida International University
  • Jeffrey Brown
    Jeffrey BrownProfessor of Finance at Johnson University
    Valrie Chambers
    Valrie ChambersAssociate Professor of Accounting at Stetson University
    Barbara VanderWerf
    Barbara VanderWerfAssistant Professor of Business and Management at Palm Beach Atlantic University
    Dena Hale
    Dena HaleAssistant Professor of Sales & Marketing at Stetson University
    Dr. Andrew Burnstine
    Dr. Andrew BurnstineAssociate Professor of Marketing at Lynn University
    Dr. Rawi Naranong
    Dr. Rawi NaranongProfessor at the School of Applied Business at Daytona State College
  • James Farrell
    James FarrellAssociate Professor of Finance and Economics at Florida Southern College
  • Dr. Alexandra Aguirre-Rodriguez
    Dr. Alexandra Aguirre-RodriguezAssociate Professor Department of Marketing & Logistics at Florida International University
    Alex Horenstein
    Alex HorensteinAssistant Professor of Economics at the University of Miami Herbert Business School
    Dr. Amanda J. Phalin
    Dr. Amanda J. PhalinSenior Lecturer, Warrington College of Business at the University of Florida
    Lealand Morin
    Lealand MorinAssistant Professor of Economics at the University of Central Florida
    Dr. Robert W. Tiller
    Dr. Robert W. TillerDirector of the University of South Florida's Financial Planning & Wealth Management Program
    Dr. Arun Upadhyay
    Dr. Arun UpadhyayAssociate Professor - Department of Finance at Florida International University
  • Jeffrey Brown
    Jeffrey BrownProfessor of Finance at Johnson University
    Valrie Chambers
    Valrie ChambersAssociate Professor of Accounting at Stetson University
    Barbara VanderWerf
    Barbara VanderWerfAssistant Professor of Business and Management at Palm Beach Atlantic University
    Dena Hale
    Dena HaleAssistant Professor of Sales & Marketing at Stetson University
    Dr. Andrew Burnstine
    Dr. Andrew BurnstineAssociate Professor of Marketing at Lynn University
    Dr. Rawi Naranong
    Dr. Rawi NaranongProfessor at the School of Applied Business at Daytona State College
  • James Farrell
    James FarrellAssociate Professor of Finance and Economics at Florida Southern College
  • Dr. Alexandra Aguirre-Rodriguez
    Dr. Alexandra Aguirre-RodriguezAssociate Professor Department of Marketing & Logistics at Florida International University
    Alex Horenstein
    Alex HorensteinAssistant Professor of Economics at the University of Miami Herbert Business School
    Dr. Amanda J. Phalin
    Dr. Amanda J. PhalinSenior Lecturer, Warrington College of Business at the University of Florida
    Lealand Morin
    Lealand MorinAssistant Professor of Economics at the University of Central Florida
    Dr. Robert W. Tiller
    Dr. Robert W. TillerDirector of the University of South Florida's Financial Planning & Wealth Management Program
    Dr. Arun Upadhyay
    Dr. Arun UpadhyayAssociate Professor - Department of Finance at Florida International University
  • Jeffrey Brown
    Jeffrey BrownProfessor of Finance at Johnson University
    Valrie Chambers
    Valrie ChambersAssociate Professor of Accounting at Stetson University
    Barbara VanderWerf
    Barbara VanderWerfAssistant Professor of Business and Management at Palm Beach Atlantic University
    Dena Hale
    Dena HaleAssistant Professor of Sales & Marketing at Stetson University
    Dr. Andrew Burnstine
    Dr. Andrew BurnstineAssociate Professor of Marketing at Lynn University
    Dr. Rawi Naranong
    Dr. Rawi NaranongProfessor at the School of Applied Business at Daytona State College
  • James Farrell
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About the Author


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Based in Nashville, Tennessee, Katy McWhirter specializes in researching and writing about education, health, travel and history. She holds a bachelor's degree in social entrepreneurship from Belmont University and a master's degree in history from the University of York. Prior to transitioning into her current role as a writer, McWhirter worked with numerous educational institutions and nonprofit organizations. More of her work can be found at www.thenative.me.


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