Best Business Credit Cards in December 2022

The best credit cards for businesses offer welcome bonuses as well as higher-than-usual cash back/rewards on category-based spending. Some of them, like the Ink Business Cash® Credit Card, come with no annual fees.

FIND YOUR NEXT CREDIT CARD

Insurance Rates

Find the best credit card for your financial goals by comparing cards from the top issuers.

Advertising & Editorial DisclosureLast Updated: 12/2/2022
Edited By     |  
Written By     |  
Last Updated: 12/2/2022

Whether you’re a freelancer, a gig worker, or a business owner with multiple employees, you may be a candidate for a small-business credit card. These can help you build both personal and business credit, finance your business charges and earn rewards.

Read more

MoneyGeek’s Take: Top 10 Business Credit Cards

Welcome bonuses vary from one card to the next, even among the top cards from this segment. This is also the case with cash back and reward rates. Depending on the card you select, you might need to pay an annual fee. We've paid due attention to these factors and others, including APRs, foreign transaction fees and added perks, to arrive at the best of the lot.

Scroll for more

swipe icon
On This Page:

Best Business Credit Card Offers

We think the best business credit cards should help you maximize your everyday expenses — and not cost you in the long run. Many of the cards in our lineup charge few or no fees, come with a low APR, have zero-interest financing offers and offer rich rewards and perks.

Best Businesses Cards With Cash Back & Travel Rewards

There are two major types of credit card rewards: cash back and general rewards. Cash back business credit cards give you a certain percentage of every purchase as cash. More general rewards programs offer points or miles that you can earn on your spending, then redeem for goods and services.


  • The Blue Business® Plus Credit Card from American Express

    Great no-annual-fee card for earning rewards on business spending


    • Good-ExcellentRecommended Credit
    • $0Annual Fee
    • up to 2X Membership Rewards® pointsRewards Rate
    • 1xRewards Rate on TV, Phone, Internet Services
    • 1xRewards Rate on Online Shopping

    Terms, rates and fees apply

  • Ink Business Cash® Credit Card

    Fantastic card for earning rewards on office supplies


    • Good-ExcellentRecommended Credit
    • $0Annual Fee
    • 1–5% Cash Back*Rewards Rate
    • 5xRewards Rate on TV, Phone, Internet Services
    • 2xRewards Rate on Dining

  • The Hilton Honors American Express Business Card

    This business credit card is perfect for earning Hilton Honors points


    • Good-ExcellentRecommended Credit
    • $95Annual Fee
    • 3–12 Points per $1*Rewards Rate
    • 12xRewards Rate at Hotels
    • 6xRewards Rate on Gas

  • Capital One Spark Miles for Business

    Best flat-rate rewards card for frequent flyers


    • Good-ExcellentRecommended Credit
    • $95Annual Fee
    • 2 Miles per $1Rewards Rate
    • 2xRewards Rate at Hotels
    • 2xRewards Rate on Groceries

  • U.S. Bank Triple Cash Rewards Visa® Business Card

    A great no annual fee cash back credit card for business


    • $0Annual Fee
    • 15 monthsBalance Transfer Duration
    • 15 monthsAPR Offer Duration
    • 1% - 5% Cash BackRewards Rate

  • Capital One Spark Cash Plus

    Excellent card for earning rewards through employee spending


    • ExcellentRecommended Credit
    • $150Annual Fee
    • 2% Cash BackRewards Rate
    • 2xRewards Rate on Gas
    • 2xRewards Rate on Groceries

  • American Express Blue Business Cash™ Card

    A simple cash back rewards card that helps you avoid hassles


    • Good-ExcellentRecommended Credit
    • $0Annual Fee
    • 1–2% Cash Back*Rewards Rate
    • 1xRewards Rate on TV, Phone, Internet Services
    • 1xRewards Rate on Gas

  • Marriott Bonvoy Business® American Express® Card

    Excellent card for maximizing the rewards you earn while traveling


    • Good-ExcellentRecommended Credit
    • $125Annual Fee
    • 2–6 Points per $1*Rewards Rate
    • 6xRewards Rate at Hotels
    • 4xRewards Rate on TV, Phone, Internet Services

  • World of Hyatt Business Credit Card

    A great business credit card for World of Hyatt members


    • $199Annual Fee
    • 1–9 PointsRewards Rate
    • 2xRewards Rate on Dining
    • 2xRewards Rate on Gas
    • NoneForeign Transaction Fee

  • Ink Business Unlimited® Credit Card

    A great business card with a flat, simple rewards structure and no annual fees.


    • Good-ExcellentRecommended Credit
    • $0Annual Fee
    • 1.5% Cash BackRewards Rate
    • 1.5xRewards Rate on TV, Phone, Internet Services
    • 1.5xRewards Rate on Entertainment

tip icon
The Best Business Credit Cards at a Glance

The links in the table below and the following component will take you to one of our partner's sites where you can compare and apply for a selected credit card.

Sorry. We were not able to load data for table...
Other Cards to Consider

gasCard

tip icon
HOW WE RANK BUSINESS CREDIT CARDS

To ensure that we provide our readers with the most accurate and up-to-date information, experts at MoneyGeek collect 57 data points from different sources, such as the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, card issuer websites and our various partners. We rely on our unique in-house ranking methodology to select the best business credit cards, and our model assigns specific percentages to different parameters based on their importance. The key parameters we consider to arrive at our list of the top credit cards for business include:

  • Annual Fee: 15%
  • Welcome Offer: 11%
  • Cash Back/Points/Miles Rate: 7%
  • APR: 5%
  • Foreign Transaction Fee: 3%

How to Compare Business Credit Cards & Intro Offers

Every business has its own needs, so some credit cards will be a better fit for you over others. When you’re comparing cards, consider how you’ll use the rewards program and features and whether the terms are affordable to you.

1

Assess your business spending

If you’ve already been in business for a while, go through statements from your business checking account or other credit cards to see which expenses regularly come up and how much you usually spend each month. This can help you choose a rewards program to maximize those expenses.

2

Consider whether you need employee cards

If your business has employees, you may want to give them access to the line of credit so they can make business-related purchases and earn rewards for the account. Check whether the credit card issuer offers employees cards, charges a fee for them or allows you to set spending limits on each card.

3

Check the credit card terms

Your credit card might cost you money if you have a high annual fee and carry a balance. But the fees could be worth it if the rewards are a good match for your expenses. And you can find ways to save money if you tend to revolve a balance; for example, the card might offer a 0% introductory APR.

4

Look for additional features

Look for other fees you might have to pay and any features that come with the card. Then consider how it will impact your business. For example, a card that charges foreign transaction fees may be a poor choice if you frequently travel overseas or make purchases with foreign suppliers.

5

Compare introductory offers

Many business credit cards come with sign-up bonuses, but you might need to spend a certain amount to earn them. Make sure you can receive the bonus without overspending.

MoneyGeek’s Guide to Finding the Best Credit Card for Your Business

Your goal might be to find a credit card that helps your business grow, but it’s just as important to understand the risks and rewards that come with them, how to apply, how to manage your account and when not to use a credit card for financing business purchases.

>> MORE: How to Get a Business Credit Card

Benefits to Having a Business Credit Card

Business credit cards come loaded with perks that can help your business get ahead. These help you:

  • Benefit
    Description
  • Finance purchases

    Whether your business needs to buy supplies or access
    cash advances, credit cards provide a ready source of capital.

  • Control employee spending

    Providing employee cards helps you better track
    employee expenses without dealing with reimbursements.

  • Earn rewards

    You might earn cash back or points that you can
    redeem for travel and other rewards. Plus, most business
    credit cards come with extra perks like travel insurance
    and extended warranties.

  • Simplify your finances

    Many business credit cards provide quarterly and
    year-end summaries and connect with bookkeeping
    software programs.

Risks Associated With Business Credit Cards

Using any type of credit card has the potential to put you into debt if you charge more than you can pay back — especially if the card comes with a high APR. But business credit cards, in particular, have a few unique risks you should consider before applying:

  • Drawback
    Description
  • You sign a personal guarantee

    Most credit card issuers require business owners to
    provide a “personal guarantee,” which is a promise to
    repay any account balance if the business is
    unable to.

  • Your personal credit may be affected

    If the card issuer reports the business credit card
    account activity to credit reporting agencies, it could
    bruise your personal credit score.

  • You receive fewer protections

    The 2009 Credit CARD Act introduced a number
    of important consumer protections, but it doesn’t apply
    to business credit cards. That’s why it’s important to
    check your monthly statements and any communications
    from your issuer. Look for changes to your APR,
    fees and other terms of the account.

Key Differences Between Personal & Business Credit Scores

Business credit cards might look and act like consumer credit cards, but there are some key differences that set them apart, such as:

  • Fewer consumer protections: Business credit cards aren’t subject to the same consumer protections provided by the 2009 Credit CARD Act, though some card issuers extend these protections as a courtesy to small businesses. Keep an eye on things like high late fees or impromptu changes to your APR.
  • Business-oriented rewards and benefits: You might have access to built-in perks such as bookkeeping features, expense-tracking tools and rewards geared toward businesses.
  • Different credit reporting policies: Business credit card issuers may report the primary cardholder’s account activity, such as payment history and balance information, to the business and personal credit bureaus.
  • More spending power: Business credit cards tend to come with higher credit limits, which could benefit you if your business has high operating costs.
  • Different credit system: You might have a good handle on how personal credit works, but business credit is more complicated. Here’s a quick overview: The three major credit-reporting bureaus — Dun & Bradstreet, Experian and Equifax — each collect financial information about your company, compile it into a credit report and assign your business a credit score. The Dun & Bradstreet PAYDEX Score and the Experian Intelliscore Plus score range from 1 to 100, with 100 being the highest score possible. Equifax measures a company’s payment history, credit risk and potential failure to arrive at three separate scores.
>> MORE: BUSINESS VS. PERSONAL CREDIT CARDS: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?
MONEYGEEK QUICK TIP:

Based on the latest Small Business Credit Survey, about 80% of small business owners reported that their personal finances were negatively impacted by the pandemic due to things like not taking a salary, having to pay for business expenses with personal funds or credit, etc

Though the economy and businesses are slowly opening back up, owners still need help bridging the gap. This is where business cards with 0% APR on new purchases or balance transfers can be helpful since they give a grace period for when interest starts accruing.

What Is Needed to Apply for a Business Credit Card

The main requirement of opening a business credit card should come as no surprise — you’ll need to operate a business. Other than that, credit card issuers generally look for:

  • This is an icon

    A personal or business credit history

    You’ll typically need good to excellent credit — a personal credit score of at least 670 or an excellent business credit score — to qualify for a business credit card. Some issuers grant cards to people with scores in the “fair” range, and if your score is lower, then you may need to apply for a secured business credit card.

  • This is an icon

    Contact details

    The card issuer will need your business name, address and phone number, along with contact details for the primary cardholder.

  • This is an icon

    Details about the business structure

    You’ll likely need to report the number of employees in your company — which might be one if it’s just you — and the number of years you’ve been in business. The card issuer will also need to know the type of industry you’re in and the company’s structure.

  • This is an icon

    Financial details

    The card issuer will want to know how much your business earns each year, how much you plan to spend each month and your tax identification number.

Once you submit an application, you might find out right away whether you’ve been approved or declined. If approved, you’ll receive a copy of the credit card in the mail within a week or two.

The process might slow down if the card issuer requests extra documentation or asks questions about the information you provided. This might add a few days or weeks to the application process.

tip icon
MONEYGEEK EXPERT TIP

According to the 2020 Small Busines Credit Survey, business owners’ personal finances remain deeply intertwined with the finances of their businesses, with 88% of firms relying on an owner’s personal credit score to secure financing.

In many cases, you’ll need strong credit to qualify for a business credit card. On a scale of 300 to 850, a FICO score of at least 670 is generally considered a “good” credit score. A higher score may give you a better chance at qualifying for the card, earn you a larger credit limit or get you a lower annual percentage rate (APR). But some card issuers might offer business credit cards for fair credit, especially if the business is well-established or has a significant annual revenue.

Questions to Ask Yourself When Choosing a Business Credit Card

If you want to earn rewards, simplify employee expenses and build credit, there are three main questions to ask yourself before opening a small business credit card account.

  1. Which credit bureaus will my card issuer report to? Every card issuer has its own policies on where it reports account information, so call the card issuer and ask about its process. The major personal credit bureaus are Experian, Equifax and TransUnion, while the main business credit bureaus are Dun & Bradstreet, Equifax, FICO SBSS and Experian.
  2. How many employees need a company card? Your company needs to have at least one employee to open a business credit card account. If you’re a sole proprietor, then you can list yourself as that employee. But if you employ multiple workers, consider whether you need to hand out employee cards and check whether the card offers them.
  3. How much does my business spend? It’s a good idea to review your business spending from the last 12 to 24 months to figure out how much you typically spend each month and determine where your money usually goes.
>> MORE: BUSINESS VS. CORPORATE CREDIT CARDS: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?
Loading...

Alternatives to Financing Business Expenses Without a Credit Card

While business credit cards can be excellent tools, they’re not the right fit for every situation. If you need more cash flow or you’re looking to save on business expenses, make sure you understand your alternative options and when to use them.

  • Financing Options
    Description
  • Business loans

    If you need to borrow a large amount and want to
    pay it off over several years, a business loan can be a
    cheaper option
    .

  • Invoice financing

    Some lenders are willing to buy your unpaid invoices
    in exchange for a certain percentage of the value. This
    could be a good option if you typically invoice your
    clients and need cash immediately.

  • Financing agreements

    You can also work out a contract financing agreement
    with your suppliers or partners. This acts like a cash
    advance on work you have yet to perform.

  • Savings programs

    Some credit cards offer savings programs — including
    Spring from Capital One, Visa SavingsEdge and Mastercard
    Easy Savings
    — that help you find discounts and
    deals on your business expenses.

Expert Advice & FAQs About Business Credit Cards

We’ve got answers to some of the most critical questions about business credit and using business credit cards:

Tips From The Pros: Finding & Using the Right Business Credit Card

  1. With fewer protections and higher interest rates than consumer cards, is it truly worth it for a small business to have and use a business card versus a personal one for business expenses?
  2. Should all small business owners or self-employed individuals have a business credit card for expenses? If not, which businesses benefit most from having a business card?
  3. What are some ways business owners can appropriately use their credit cards to build credit and stay out of debt?
Amit Sinha
Amit Sinha

Professor of Finance and Quantitative Methods at Bradley University

David Sacco
David Sacco

Practitioner in Residence at the University of New Haven

Dr. Christopher Newman
Dr. Christopher Newman

Associate Professor of Marketing at The University of Mississippi

Chad Nehring
Chad Nehring

Certified Financial Planner

John Longo
John Longo

Professor of Finance at Rutgers Business School; Author of Buffett's Tips: A Guide to Financial Literacy and Life

Dr. Brandon Di Paolo Harrison
Dr. Brandon Di Paolo Harrison

Assistant Professor of Accounting at Austin Peay State University

Scott W. Hegerty
Scott W. Hegerty

Associate Professor of Economics at Northeastern Illinois University

Carrie Friedberg
Carrie Friedberg

SF Money Coach, Certified Financial Coach and Financial Behavior Specialist®

May Jiang
May Jiang

CPA, CFP®, Founder of Beyond Profit and Wealth Consulting

Sandra D. Adams, CFP®
Sandra D. Adams, CFP®

Lead Financial Planner/Partner at The Center for Financial Planning, Inc.

Catharine Curran, PhD
Catharine Curran, PhD

Associate Professor, Management & Marketing at The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

Deanne Butchey
Deanne Butchey

Teaching Professor, Department of Finance at the College of Business, Florida International University

Julia Menez
Julia Menez

Travel Hacking Coach and Founder of Geobreeze

 Ramiro J. Atristain-Carrion
Ramiro J. Atristain-Carrion

Executive In Residence and Adjunct Professor of Finance at Dominican University

Yutong Xie
Yutong Xie

Assistant Professor of Finance at The College of New Jersey

Dr. Andrew Burnstine
Dr. Andrew Burnstine

Associate Professor of Marketing at Lynn University

Mark T. Schenkel
Mark T. Schenkel

Associate Editor at Journal of Small Business Management and Professor of Entrepreneurship at Jack C. Massey College of Business

Russ McCullough, PhD
Russ McCullough, PhD

Wayne Angell Chair of Economics and Director/Founder Gwartney Institute at Ottawa University

Tahereh Alavi Hojjat
Tahereh Alavi Hojjat

Chair & Professor of Economics

Salil K. Sarkar, PhD, CFA
Salil K. Sarkar, PhD, CFA

Professor of Finance, Coordinator, Doctoral Finance Program at The University of Texas at Arlington

Sheila A. Handy
Sheila A. Handy

Visiting Professor - Department of Economics at Lafayette College

Jesse Veenstra
Jesse Veenstra

Instructor of Finance at Dordt University

William Nunn, CFP®
William Nunn, CFP®

Managing Member, Founder of Horizon Financial Planning LLC

Jacqueline R. Jaeger
Jacqueline R. Jaeger

Adjunct Business Faculty at the University of Dubuque

Philip Mayer
Philip Mayer

Professor of Economics and Political Science at Three Rivers Community College

Dr. Tammie S. Lang, Ed.D
Dr. Tammie S. Lang, Ed.D

Program Director, Business Administration at Southeast Community College

Joe Roberts, Ph.D.
Joe Roberts, Ph.D.

Director, Center for Innovation and Professional Development at Webster University

Chuck Lopez
Chuck Lopez

Lecturer at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

Kevin J. Machan
Kevin J. Machan

Adjunct Faculty Member of the College of Graduate Studies at Cardinal Stritch University

Jeff Jeter
Jeff Jeter

Executive Director of Financial Planning at Heritage Investors

Kimberly Bailiff
Kimberly Bailiff

Adjunct Instructor of Marketing at Walsh College

David S. (Steve) Heesacker
David S. (Steve) Heesacker

Business Instructor at Central Carolina Community College

Melinda Shew
Melinda Shew

Business Technologies Instructor at Surry Community College

James Sundberg, CGMA, CPA
James Sundberg, CGMA, CPA

Part-Time Instructor at Cleary University

J. Cameron Verhaal
J. Cameron Verhaal

Assistant Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship at Tulane University’s Freeman School of Business

Alexandre Olbrecht
Alexandre Olbrecht

Professor of Economics and Executive Director, Eastern Economic Association at the Ramapo College Of New Jersey

Bruce Bachenheimer
Bruce Bachenheimer

Clinical Professor of Management and Executive Director of the Entrepreneurship Lab at Pace University

Christopher S. Tang
Christopher S. Tang

UCLA Distinguished Professor at UCLA Anderson School of Management

Nicole Hunter
Nicole Hunter

Clinical Assistant Professor of Finance at the University at Buffalo School of Management

Dr. Michael Provitera
Dr. Michael Provitera

Professor of Organizational Behavior at Barry University

Dr. Karyl B. Leggio
Dr. Karyl B. Leggio

Professor of Finance, Sellinger School of Business at Loyola University Maryland

Catherine Valega
Catherine Valega

Certified Financial Planning Prof (CFP), and CAIA (Chartered Alternative Investment Analyst)

Dr. Kareem Tannous
Dr. Kareem Tannous

Assistant Professor at Cabrini University

Peter Staples
Peter Staples

Assistant Professor of Business and Economics at Lyon College

Caleb Martin
Caleb Martin

Professor of Accounting at Erskine College

Chris M. Lawrey, PhD
Chris M. Lawrey, PhD

Assistant Professor at the University of South Alabama

Laura Coordes
Laura Coordes

Associate Professor of Law at Arizona State University

John Peatross
John Peatross

Certified Public Accountant and Adjunct Instructor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Dr. Angela Buchanan
Dr. Angela Buchanan

Associate Professor in Business & Economics at Lyon College

Monique Beauchamp-Doll
Monique Beauchamp-Doll

Professor of Business Administration at Macomb Community College

Sean Tossi
Sean Tossi

Assistant Professor of Management at University of Cincinnati

Steve Horan
Steve Horan

Assistant Professor of Business

Bill Miller
Bill Miller

Professor of Accounting at University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

Dr. James J. Carroll, CPA
Dr. James J. Carroll, CPA

Professor Emeritus

Tufan Ekici
Tufan Ekici

Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics at Ramapo College of New Jersey

Michael A. Adamo
Michael A. Adamo

Professor at County College of Morris

Mark Oxley
Mark Oxley

Accounting & Business Instructor, Casper College

Dr. Stephen Brincks
Dr. Stephen Brincks

Professor of Finance at San Diego State University

Kevin Kuenn
Kevin Kuenn

Fixed Term Instructor of Business at Northwest College

Robert Fitzgerald
Robert Fitzgerald

Accounting Instructor at Motlow State Community College

Rob Larson
Rob Larson

Associate Professor of Management at Luther College

Colby D. Green, PhD
Colby D. Green, PhD

Assistant Professor of Strategic Management at the Dixie L. Leavitt School of Business at Southern Utah University

Dr. Jeremiah Nelson
Dr. Jeremiah Nelson

Assistant Professor of Management at Catawba College

Christian Nelson
Christian Nelson

Staff Accountant at Bay de Noc Community College

Rita W. Green, Ed.D.
Rita W. Green, Ed.D.

Founder of GRADES LLC, Certified Personal/Family Finance Educator and Accredited Financial Counselor

Amarjit Singh
Amarjit Singh

Professor, Various Universities

Dr. Christopher M. Scalzo
Dr. Christopher M. Scalzo

Associate Professor at SUNY Morrisville

Lyle M. Rupert
Lyle M. Rupert

C. Louis and Charlotte Cabe Distinguished Professorship in Economics and Business

David Hart
David Hart

Executive in Residence at Oklahoma Wesleyan University

Jack Yoest Jr.
Jack Yoest Jr.

Assistant Professor of Practice in Leadership and Management at The Catholic University of America

Dr. Maria H. Sanchez
Dr. Maria H. Sanchez

Professor of Accountancy at Rider University, CPA, Ph.D.

FAQs

Next Steps

Now that you know what you can expect from the best business credit cards, select one based on your specific needs and spending patterns. For instance, you may benefit by getting a card with an annual fee if you feel you'll be able to offset the cost through its various features and benefits.

Compare Credit Cards

Continue Reading

sources
*Rates, fees or bonuses may vary or include specific stipulations. The content on this page is accurate as of the posting/last updated date; however, some of the offers mentioned may have expired. We recommend visiting the card issuer’s website for the most up-to-date information available.
Editorial Disclosure: Opinions, reviews, analyses and recommendations are the author’s alone and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any bank, credit card issuer, hotel, airline, or other entity.
Advertiser Disclosure: MoneyGeek has partnered with CardRatings.com and CreditCards.com for our coverage of credit card products. MoneyGeek, CardRatings and CreditCards.com may receive a commission from card issuers. To ensure thorough comparisons and reviews, MoneyGeek features products from both paid partners and unaffiliated card issuers that are not paid partners.