Hawaii Fatal Accident Study:

Hawaii’s Deadliest Roads and Fatal Accident Statistics

From 2017 to 2019, 308 car accidents in Hawaii resulted in fatalities. MoneyGeek’s analysis looked into surrounding circumstances to determine the most dangerous roads in the state and the factors contributing to crashes.

Advertising & Editorial Disclosure
Last Updated: 4/26/2022
1 Expert Contribution
Written By     |  

MoneyGeek analyzed 308 deadly crashes on 166 roads in Hawaii’s 9,799 miles of road between 2017 and 2019. We also looked at factors that contributed to fatal accidents in the state. These include driver behaviors such as speeding, drunk driving and distracted driving, as well as the most common times of the year these accidents occurred. MoneyGeek also identified the deadliest road in each county in the state.

Key Findings

  • Farrington Highway from Lualualei Naval Rd. to Maliona St. is the deadliest stretch of road in Hawaii. Between 2017–2019, seven fatal accidents occurred here.
  • Speeding contributed to 45% of accidents, the highest percentage of any factor measured. Drunk driving was the second-most common factor, involved in 30% of deadly crashes.
  • Distracted driving was involved in 77 fatal crashes from 2017–2019. A MoneyGeek study ranked Hawaii as the fourth-worst state for distracted driving in the U.S.
  • Thirty-two deadly accidents occurred in November, the most of any month. May (30) and December (30) had the next two highest numbers of accidents, respectively.
  • Honolulu had more fatal accidents than any other county. Most of these occurred on Farrington Highway.

10 Deadliest Road Stretches in Hawaii


  • DEADLIEST ROAD IN HAWAII
    Farrington Highway from Lualualei Naval Rd. to Maliona St.
    Ma‘ili | Nanakuli
    Farrington Highway from Lualualei Naval Rd. to Maliona St.
    • Fatal Accidents:7
    • fatalities:7
    • Crashes Per Mile:2.4
    • distance:2.9 miles
  • Pi‘ilani Highway from N. Kihei Rd. to E. Welakahao Rd.
    Kihei
    Pi‘ilani Highway from N. Kihei Rd. to E. Welakahao Rd.
    • Fatal Accidents:5
    • fatalities:8
    • Crashes Per Mile:1.6
    • distance:3.2 miles
  • Kalaniana‘ole Highway from Nalu St. to Halemaumau St.
    Honolulu | Waimanalo
    Kalaniana‘ole Highway from Nalu St. to Halemaumau St.
    • Fatal Accidents:5
    • fatalities:5
    • Crashes Per Mile:1.1
    • distance:4.4 miles
  • Kuhio Highway from Mailuhuna Rd. to Lanikai St.
    Kapa‘a | Wailua
    Kuhio Highway from Mailuhuna Rd. to Lanikai St.
    • Fatal Accidents:4
    • fatalities:7
    • Crashes Per Mile:1.2
    • distance:3.2 miles
  • Farrington Highway from Manawai St. to Ali‘inui Dr.
    Kapolei
    Farrington Highway from Manawai St. to Ali‘inui Dr.
    • Fatal Accidents:4
    • fatalities:4
    • Crashes Per Mile:1.1
    • distance:3.5 miles
  • H-1 from Queen Emma St. to Exit 24B
    Honolulu
    H-1 from Queen Emma St. to Exit 24B
    • Fatal Accidents:4
    • fatalities:4
    • Crashes Per Mile:1.2
    • distance:3.4 miles
  • Mamalahoa Highway from Puu Lani Dr. to Daniel K. Inouye Hwy.
    Waimea | Kamuela | Kailua Kona
    Mamalahoa Highway from Puu Lani Dr. to Daniel K. Inouye Hwy.
    • Fatal Accidents:4
    • fatalities:4
    • Crashes Per Mile:1.3
    • distance:3.1 miles
  • Kea‘au - Pahoa Road from Kamaili Rd. to Kapoho Rd.
    Pahoa
    Kea‘au - Pahoa Road from Kamaili Rd. to Kapoho Rd.
    • Fatal Accidents:4
    • fatalities:4
    • Crashes Per Mile:1.0
    • distance:4.0 miles
  • H-2 from Higgins Rd. to Exit 1B
    Mililani Town | Pearl City | Waipahu
    H-2 from Higgins Rd. to Exit 1B
    • Fatal Accidents:4
    • fatalities:4
    • Crashes Per Mile:0.8
    • distance:4.9 miles
  • Queen Ka‘ahumanu Highway from Kua Bay Access Rd. to Keahole Airport Rd.
    Kailua Kona
    Queen Ka‘ahumanu Highway from Kua Bay Access Rd. to Keahole Airport Rd.
    • Fatal Accidents:3
    • fatalities:5
    • Crashes Per Mile:1.0
    • distance:3.1 miles

Drunk Driving Involved in 30% of Fatal Accidents

From 2017 to 2019, out of 308 crashes resulting in fatalities in Hawaii, 92 were related to drunk driving. A blood alcohol concentration of (BAC) of 0.8% makes you legally drunk, but you can already be visibly impaired even if it’s only at 0.2%. That means having two beers can put you and your passengers in danger, no matter how sober you feel. Studies have shown that drivers with higher BACs have slower reaction times, making it more challenging to operate a vehicle.

The consequences of drunk driving are numerous. It can lead to license suspension, restricted driving privileges and possible jail time. It also results in less affordable car insurance rates in Hawaii. Purchasing an SR-22 insurance policy in Hawaii is significantly more costly than a standard coverage.

Speeding Is a Factor in 45% of Fatal Crashes

MoneyGeek’s analysis showed speeding contributed to 138 fatal accidents in Hawaii. That translates to roughly 45% of all crashes resulting in deaths, making it the factor most commonly associated with deadly accidents. It’s clear that driving too fast puts you, your passengers and the people around you in peril.

It’s easier to lose control of your car when you’re speeding. It also makes the protective equipment in your vehicle less effective, meaning you’re likely to suffer more severe injuries or worse — a fatality — if you crash.

Distracted Driving Contributed to 25% of Fatal Accidents

Seventy-seven accidents — 25% of all fatal crashes in Hawaii from 2017 to 2019 — involved distracted driving. While the state has made efforts to limit crashes related to distracted driving — including enacting a distracted driving ban in 2013 — distracted driving rates and fatalities remain high in the state. A MoneyGeek study found that Hawaii was the fourth-worst state for distracted driving in the U.S.

November Had More Fatal Accidents Than Any Other Month

Based on MoneyGeek’s analysis, most fatal accidents in Hawaii between 2017 and 2019 happened in November. Within three years, 32 crashes resulting in deaths were recorded — that’s 10.4% of all fatal accidents. May and December follow close behind, with 9.7% of deadly crashes in the state each.

Average Fatal Accidents by Month
Month
Fatal Accidents
Drunk Driving Related
Distracted Driving Related
Winter Conditions
Speeding Related
% of Total

January

28

12

8

0

15

9.1%

February

21

3

7

0

8

6.8%

March

27

10

4

0

14

8.8%

April

18

7

7

0

12

5.8%

May

30

9

12

0

14

9.7%

June

26

6

6

0

10

8.4%

July

24

11

6

0

11

7.8%

August

24

6

3

0

11

7.8%

September

24

6

5

0

9

7.8%

October

24

6

4

0

8

7.8%

November

32

11

9

0

14

10.4%

December

30

5

6

0

12

9.7%

Driving Safely Protects You, Others and Your Wallet

Safe driving doesn’t just benefit you — it makes Hawaii roadways less dangerous. It may also save you money in the long term.

However, sometimes, accidents do happen. If you find yourself in this situation, it’s crucial to be insured. Carrying an affordable full coverage auto insurance policy can protect you against costs from medical treatments and car repairs after a crash.

The average cost of full coverage car insurance in Hawaii is $1,066 per year. Car insurance coverage in Honolulu costs this much annually, on average. However, your actual annual premium may vary if you live in other parts of the state.

Remember that the premium mentioned is only the average. Car insurance companies use various factors when setting rates. These elements make your driver profile unique, such as your age and driving history. Comparing quotes from multiple car insurance companies can help you find the cheapest car insurance in Hawaii.

Fatal Accidents and Most Dangerous Roads: County Breakdown

Out of 308 deadly incidents recorded in Hawaii between 2017 and 2019, Honolulu contributed the most at 155. Most of these fatal accidents happened along Farrington Highway and were related to speeding (79) and distracted driving (43).

Fatal Accidents and Contributing Factors By County
County
Fatalities
Fatal Accidents
Drunk Driving Related
Distracted Driving Related
Speeding Related
Most Deadly Road

Honolulu

162

155

36

43

79

Farrington Highway (15)

Hawaii

92

88

31

30

42

Mamalahoa Highway (21)

Maui

56

49

21

2

11

Pi‘ilani Highway (6)

Kauai

22

16

4

2

6

Kuhio Highway (6)

Methodology

To conduct this analysis, MoneyGeek analyzed data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration FARS (fatal accident reporting system) database using fatality data from 2017, 2018 and 2019. 2019 is the latest data available in the system.

About the Author


expert-profile

Doug Milnes is the head of marketing and communications at MoneyGeek. He has spent more than a decade in corporate finance performing valuations for Duff and Phelps and financial planning and analysis for various companies including OpenTable. He holds a master’s degree in Predictive Analytics (Data Science) from Northwestern University and is a CFA charter holder. Doug geeks out on building financial and predictive models and using data to make informed decisions.


sources