How Much Is Car Insurance in Kansas? Rates by Coverage Level, Age, Driving History and Location

The average car insurance cost in Kansas is $931 annually, the 14th cheapest in the country compared to the national annual average of $1,424. These averages are for many companies and locations for one sample driver. MoneyGeek broke down averages by coverage level, credit score, age, driving history and location in this guide.

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The average car insurance cost in Kansas is $931 annually. This average is for a 40-year-old driver with a clean driving record and a full coverage policy.

If the same 40-year-old driver buys a car insurance policy in Kansas with minimum coverage, it would cost an average of $456 per year. However, these prices can vary depending on the individual’s profile. For example, a young driver with a full coverage policy in Kansas would pay an average of $2,394 per year.

To help you understand how rates can change, MoneyGeek has broken down average car insurance costs in Kansas by different essential factors.

Average Cost of Car Insurance in Kansas: Summary

MoneyGeek’s research shows that the average cost of car insurance depends on a variety of factors. In Kansas, your age and credit scores have the greatest impact on the cost of your car insurance policy.

Learning more about how individual factors impact the average cost of car insurance can help you find the best coverage and price for your needs.

Average Costs of Car Insurance in Kansas

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Why Are Car Insurance Rates Cheap in Kansas?

MoneyGeek’s research shows that Kansas has the 14th cheapest average car insurance costs among all states. Despite being a state with no-fault insurance, car insurance costs are affordable due to a low traffic density, probability of natural disasters and number of uninsured drivers.

In Kansas, only 11 percent of drivers don’t have car insurance. The state also has lower highway traffic density and natural disasters, as hurricanes and extreme weather conditions are less likely to occur. These factors contribute to lower annual premiums in Kansas.

Average Cost of Car Insurance in Kansas: Full Coverage vs. Minimum Coverage

In Kansas, an insurance policy that meets the minimum required coverage level has an average cost of $456 per year. In contrast, a full coverage policy, as defined in MoneyGeek’s methodology, has an average cost of $931 annually. There is a difference of an average of $475 between both types of policies.

The average car insurance costs in Kansas can significantly change depending on the extent of your coverage. If you purchase a full coverage policy, it will include liability, comprehensive and collision insurance; however, it’s going to cost you more.

Average Cost of Car Insurance in Kansas by Coverage Level

Minimum vs. Full Coverage Car Insurance Costs in Kansas - By Company

Your insurance expenses significantly depend on your choice of an insurance company, as every company has different car insurance rates. In Kansas, American Family is the most affordable option for cheap full coverage insurance plans and minimum coverage plans.

While USAA is another cheap option, it’s only available for military families. Additionally, it offers you the cheapest liability-only car insurance in Kansas.

On average, MetLife offers the most expensive full coverage insurance plan and Allstate has the priciest minimum coverage plan in the state.

Average Annual Costs of Car Insurance in Kansas - By Company

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How Much Is Car Insurance in Kansas by Age

The age of the driver has a significant effect on the cost of car insurance. Young drivers are more likely to get into accidents and are considered risky by insurers; hence, they get expensive car insurance quotes in Kansas.

Our data shows a difference of an average of $1,463 per year between the car insurance costs of a 40-year-old buying their policy compared to a 16-year-old on their own policy.

It is possible for young drivers to save money on insurance premiums if they are added to their parents’ car insurance plan.

Additionally, first-time drivers are viewed the same as young drivers by insurance companies. This means you can anticipate similar insurance rates if you have recently started driving in Kansas.

Average Costs of Full Coverage Car Insurance in Kansas - By Age

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How Does Driving History Affect Car Insurance Costs in Kansas?

People with bad driving records and multiple violations under their names will usually have higher car insurance costs as they are considered high-risk individuals by insurers. However, many cheaper options are also available.

MoneyGeek’s research shows that people with a speeding ticket pay an average of $208 more per year for a car insurance plan than someone with a clean driving record. The cost difference increases with the severity of the violation.

Average Costs of Full Coverage Car Insurance in Kansas - By Driving History

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  • Driving Violation
    Annual Premium
  • Safe Driver
    $931
  • Speeding Ticket
    $1,139
  • At-Fault Accident
    $1,423
  • DUI
    $1,418

Credit Scores and the Cost of Car Insurance in Kansas

Your credit history plays a significant part in determining your car insurance costs. MoneyGeek’s research shows that people with a poor credit score in Kansas pay an average of $712 more per year compared to someone who has a good credit score.

Conversely, people with excellent credit pay an average of $166 less per year than someone with a good credit score.

In Kansas, drivers with good credit scores can save money on insurance premiums and those with bad credit scores may be required to pay more. However, shopping around can help you find cheaper options in the state.

Average Costs of Full Coverage Car Insurance in Kansas - By Credit Score

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  • Credit Score
    Annual Premium
  • Excellent
    $725
  • Good
    $890
  • Fair
    $1,085
  • Below Fair
    $1,331
  • Poor
    $1,602

How Much Is Car Insurance in Your City?

While car insurance costs are different in every state for various reasons, they can also vary significantly within a state. Usually, densely populated cities or cities with higher chances of accidents have higher car insurance rates.

In Kansas, Olathe is the cheapest option for car insurance at an average annual cost of $816, 12.4 percent less than the state's average cost of car insurance.

Kansas City is the most expensive option for car insurance at an average cost of $1,051 per year, 12.9 percent more than the state's average cost of car insurance.

Average Costs of Full Coverage Car Insurance in Kansas - By City

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Frequently Asked Questions About Kansas Car Insurance Rates

These frequently asked questions about Kansas car insurance rates will help you make an informed decision while shopping for a car insurance plan.

Methodology

The car insurance quotes were collected in collaboration with Quadrant Information Services across Kansas. The policies were for a 40-year-old driver and full coverage with a safe driving record unless altered by the factors described above including coverage levels, age, driving violations and credit score. The definition of a full coverage policy is on our methodology page.

MoneyGeek also collected data on traffic, uninsured motorists, the urban share of the population and motor vehicle theft rates.

  • Highway traffic density was calculated with 2019 data from the Federal Highway Administration
  • Data on uninsured motorists was drawn from 2019 data from the Insurance Research Council
  • Urban share of population was calculated using the latest data from the U.S. Census Bureau
  • Data on motor vehicle theft rate was drawn from the FBI Crime in the United States Report for 2019.

About the Author


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Mark Fitzpatrick is a senior content manager with MoneyGeek specializing in insurance. Mark has years of experience analyzing the insurance market and creating original research and content. He graduated from Boston College with a Bachelor of Arts and Johns Hopkins University with a Master of Arts.


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