How Much Is Full Coverage Car Insurance & What Does It Cover?

Full coverage car insurance costs an average of $1,330 per year. This rate is for 100/300/100 full coverage insurance with a $1,000 deductible. Full coverage insurance combines different coverage types. Typically, it includes liability insurance with comprehensive and collision coverage. Since it offers more protection, full coverage car insurance can be expensive.

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Last Updated: 11/10/2022
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The cost of full coverage car insurance varies, depending on different factors. On average, it costs $1,330 per year for a 40-year-old male driver with a clean driving record and good credit.

Full coverage car insurance provides protection for various scenarios. It’s a policy that meets the state minimum liability insurance requirement. Additionally, it includes comprehensive insurance that can cover theft and damages due to non-collision causes and collision coverage that pays damages to the car due to road accidents.

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Full coverage car insurance is a good option for people looking for protection against most scenarios, including collision and non-collision damages. Given the wider coverage, this type of policy tends to cost more.

Key Takeaways

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Full coverage car insurance includes multiple coverage types, usually liability insurance with comprehensive and collision insurance.

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Various factors affect the cost of full coverage car insurance. Providers consider location, age, driving record, credit score and other individualized factors when calculating premiums.

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The average full coverage insurance price is $1,330 for a 40-year-old male driver with a clean driving record and good credit.

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How Much Is Full Coverage Car Insurance by State?

The average full coverage insurance price is $1,330 per year for an average driver. Different factors affect actual rates, including state traffic statistics.

For instance, the average annual cost of a full coverage policy in Maine is $607. Meanwhile, a similar policy costs $4,333 in Michigan.

Average Full Coverage Insurance Cost per Year by State

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  • State
    Full Coverage Cost
  • Alabama
    $1,221
  • Alaska
    $984
  • Arizona
    $1,284
  • Arkansas
    $1,189
  • California
    $1,429
  • Colorado
    $1,450
  • Connecticut
    $1,442
  • Delaware
    $1,483
  • District of Columbia
    $1,202
  • Florida
    $2,208
  • Georgia
    $1,638
  • Hawaii
    $1,066
  • Idaho
    $745
  • Illinois
    $1,134
  • Indiana
    $725
  • Iowa
    $778
  • Kansas
    $931
  • Kentucky
    $1,405
  • Louisiana
    $3,041
  • Maine
    $607
  • Maryland
    $2,127
  • Massachusetts
    $1,112
  • Michigan
    $4,333
  • Minnesota
    $1,199
  • Mississippi
    $1,112
  • Missouri
    $1,305
  • Montana
    $1,216
  • Nebraska
    $923
  • Nevada
    $1,900
  • New Hampshire
    $778
  • New Jersey
    $1,674
  • New Mexico
    $1,133
  • New York
    $3,433
  • North Carolina
    $841
  • North Dakota
    $743
  • Ohio
    $803
  • Oklahoma
    $1,299
  • Oregon
    $1,181
  • Pennsylvania
    $1,818
  • Rhode Island
    $1,822
  • South Carolina
    $1,139
  • South Dakota
    $817
  • Tennessee
    $1,018
  • Texas
    $1,316
  • Utah
    $1,154
  • Vermont
    $812
  • Virginia
    $790
  • Washington
    $1,264
  • West Virginia
    $1,016
  • Wisconsin
    $933
  • Wyoming
    $851
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Car insurance rates may be more expensive in some states than in others. That’s because of factors like highway density, the number of uninsured motorists, population density and theft rates. Living in a no-fault auto insurance state also has an impact on the cost of car insurance.

How Much Is Full Coverage Insurance by Age?

Age is one of the biggest factors affecting the cost of full coverage car insurance. Generally, young drivers under the age of 25 tend to have more expensive premiums because of having little driving experience. On the other hand, individuals over 75 are more expensive to insure because they are considered more likely to get into accidents.

The table below shows the average full coverage insurance price by age.

Average Full Coverage Insurance Cost per Year by Age in Different States

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  • State
    16-Year-Old
    25-Year-Old
    40-Year-Old
    50-Year-Old
  • AK
    $3,011
    $1,214
    $984
    $924
  • AL
    $3,060
    $1,314
    $1,221
    $1,087
  • AR
    $3,121
    $1,212
    $1,189
    $1,008
  • AZ
    $3,231
    $1,207
    $1,284
    $1,040
  • CA
    $4,187
    $1,739
    $1,429
    $1,320
  • CO
    $3,819
    $1,493
    $1,450
    $1,280
  • CT
    $3,471
    $1,429
    $1,442
    $1,244
  • DC
    $3,621
    $1,413
    $1,202
    $1,223
  • DE
    $3,801
    $1,655
    $1,483
    $1,482
  • FL
    $4,913
    $2,215
    $2,208
    $1,949
  • GA
    $5,022
    $2,039
    $1,638
    $1,665
  • IA
    $1,877
    $763
    $778
    $621
  • ID
    $2,274
    $851
    $745
    $657
  • IL
    $3,642
    $1,399
    $1,134
    $1,096
  • IN
    $1,816
    $749
    $725
    $638
  • KS
    $2,394
    $1,002
    $931
    $837
  • KY
    $3,944
    $1,568
    $1,405
    $1,347
  • LA
    $8,852
    $3,796
    $3,041
    $3,394
  • MA
    $3,134
    $1,247
    $1,112
    $1,141
  • MD
    $6,340
    $2,383
    $2,127
    $2,021
  • ME
    $1,672
    $699
    $607
    $596
  • MI
    $8,313
    $3,422
    $4,333
    $3,060
  • MN
    $3,658
    $1,669
    $1,199
    $1,357
  • MO
    $2,428
    $1,269
    $1,305
    $1,061
  • MS
    $3,203
    $1,263
    $1,112
    $1,062
  • MT
    $2,640
    $1,094
    $1,216
    $946
  • NC
    $2,060
    $850
    $841
    $781
  • ND
    $1,888
    $803
    $743
    $672
  • NE
    $2,148
    $835
    $923
    $706
  • NH
    $2,258
    $834
    $778
    $672
  • NJ
    $4,172
    $1,734
    $1,674
    $1,461
  • NM
    $3,698
    $1,376
    $1,133
    $1,176
  • NV
    $4,672
    $1,750
    $1,900
    $1,598
  • NY
    $9,285
    $3,561
    $3,433
    $3,184
  • OH
    $1,778
    $800
    $803
    $664
  • OK
    $2,473
    $1,111
    $1,299
    $1,017
  • OR
    $2,663
    $1,142
    $1,181
    $988
  • PA
    $4,037
    $1,665
    $1,818
    $1,430
  • RI
    $5,056
    $2,033
    $1,822
    $1,730
  • SC
    $2,855
    $1,386
    $1,139
    $1,004
  • SD
    $2,097
    $924
    $817
    $745
  • TN
    $2,555
    $1,091
    $1,018
    $899
  • TX
    $3,548
    $1,211
    $1,316
    $992
  • UT
    $3,315
    $1,264
    $1,154
    $1,112
  • VA
    $2,202
    $808
    $790
    $652
  • VT
    $2,238
    $933
    $812
    $753
  • WA
    $2,731
    $1,135
    $1,264
    $936
  • WI
    $2,348
    $1,009
    $933
    $799
  • WV
    $2,463
    $1,036
    $1,016
    $878
  • WY
    $2,085
    $876
    $851
    $742

How Much Is Full Coverage Insurance by Driving Record?

Driving record plays an important role in determining car insurance costs. A person with a clean record pays an average of $1,330 per year for a full coverage policy. Having a speeding ticket increases the average cost to $1,677.

Individuals involved in an at-fault accident spend an average of $2,012 per year for full coverage car insurance. Having a DUI will increase the average rate to $2,440.

The table below shows how much full coverage car insurance costs based on your driving record.

Average Full Coverage Insurance Cost per Year by Driving Record in Different States

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  • State
    No Violations
    Speeding Ticket
    Accident
    DUI
  • AK
    $984
    $1,144
    $1,437
    $1,478
  • AL
    $1,221
    $1,483
    $1,635
    $2,064
  • AR
    $1,189
    $1,598
    $1,876
    $2,133
  • AZ
    $1,284
    $1,583
    $1,869
    $1,898
  • CA
    $1,429
    $2,057
    $2,463
    $4,075
  • CO
    $1,450
    $1,701
    $2,080
    $2,187
  • CT
    $1,442
    $1,809
    $2,202
    $2,809
  • DC
    $1,202
    $1,385
    $1,633
    $1,767
  • DE
    $1,483
    $1,749
    $2,045
    $2,591
  • FL
    $2,208
    $2,902
    $3,246
    $3,763
  • GA
    $1,638
    $2,110
    $2,738
    $2,929
  • HI
    $1,066
    $1,253
    $1,515
    $3,346
  • IA
    $778
    $966
    $1,152
    $1,283
  • ID
    $745
    $872
    $1,052
    $1,144
  • IL
    $1,134
    $1,452
    $1,795
    $2,181
  • IN
    $725
    $930
    $1,123
    $1,099
  • KS
    $931
    $1,139
    $1,423
    $1,418
  • KY
    $1,405
    $1,683
    $2,147
    $2,597
  • LA
    $3,041
    $3,825
    $4,459
    $4,953
  • MA
    $1,112
    $1,384
    $1,788
    $1,986
  • MD
    $2,127
    $2,506
    $2,970
    $3,178
  • ME
    $607
    $800
    $904
    $987
  • MI
    $4,333
    $6,759
    $7,248
    $11,525
  • MN
    $1,199
    $1,559
    $1,767
    $2,395
  • MO
    $1,305
    $1,575
    $1,859
    $1,852
  • MS
    $1,112
    $1,370
    $1,768
    $1,953
  • MT
    $1,216
    $1,483
    $1,755
    $2,146
  • NC
    $841
    $1,193
    $1,345
    $3,397
  • ND
    $743
    $948
    $1,141
    $1,329
  • NE
    $923
    $1,055
    $1,444
    $1,648
  • NH
    $778
    $905
    $1,083
    $1,354
  • NJ
    $1,674
    $2,259
    $2,766
    $3,320
  • NM
    $1,133
    $1,352
    $1,713
    $2,125
  • NV
    $1,900
    $2,355
    $2,747
    $2,903
  • NY
    $3,433
    $4,287
    $5,274
    $5,982
  • OH
    $803
    $1,007
    $1,215
    $1,275
  • OK
    $1,299
    $1,657
    $1,834
    $2,025
  • OR
    $1,181
    $1,541
    $1,785
    $1,787
  • PA
    $1,818
    $2,141
    $3,071
    $3,204
  • RI
    $1,822
    $2,227
    $2,457
    $3,369
  • SC
    $1,139
    $1,363
    $1,700
    $1,772
  • SD
    $817
    $941
    $1,135
    $1,395
  • TN
    $1,018
    $1,233
    $1,428
    $1,637
  • TX
    $1,316
    $1,451
    $2,048
    $1,987
  • UT
    $1,154
    $1,419
    $1,811
    $1,723
  • VA
    $790
    $977
    $1,183
    $1,414
  • VT
    $812
    $963
    $1,158
    $1,484
  • WA
    $1,264
    $1,522
    $2,186
    $2,172
  • WI
    $933
    $1,231
    $1,479
    $1,899
  • WV
    $1,016
    $1,288
    $1,511
    $1,863
  • WY
    $851
    $1,115
    $1,138
    $1,642
  • $1,677
    $2,012
    $2,440
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Aside from an increase in car insurance premiums, drivers convicted of a DUI also need an SR-22 or an FR-44. This is a form that your insurer must file to prove that you meet the state minimum liability car insurance requirements.

How Much Is Full Coverage Insurance by Credit Score?

Insurance providers also consider credit scores when determining how much a policy will cost. Generally, drivers with bad credit pay 48% more than the average annual cost of auto insurance. Some states like California, Hawaii and Massachusetts don’t include credit scores when calculating insurance rates.

The table below shows how credit scores affect full coverage car insurance costs.

Average Full Coverage Insurance Cost per Year by Credit Score in Different States

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  • State
    Excellent
    Fair
    Poor
  • AK
    $860
    $1,108
    $1,412
  • AL
    $973
    $1,464
    $2,138
  • AR
    $958
    $1,488
    $2,144
  • AZ
    $988
    $1,545
    $2,495
  • CA
    N/A
    N/A
    N/A
  • CO
    $1,211
    $1,781
    $2,515
  • CT
    $1,221
    $1,782
    $2,511
  • DC
    $1,011
    $1,428
    $2,107
  • DE
    $1,269
    $1,989
    $2,959
  • FL
    $1,644
    $2,648
    $4,194
  • GA
    $1,464
    $2,090
    $2,955
  • HI
    N/A
    N/A
    N/A
  • IA
    $620
    $885
    $1,237
  • ID
    $608
    $886
    $1,245
  • IL
    $985
    $1,430
    $2,077
  • IN
    $576
    $856
    $1,220
  • KS
    $725
    $1,085
    $1,602
  • KY
    $1,187
    $1,862
    $3,023
  • LA
    $2,689
    $4,417
    $6,874
  • MA
    N/A
    N/A
    N/A
  • MD
    $1,868
    $2,893
    $3,826
  • ME
    $511
    $712
    $1,046
  • MI
    $3,361
    $5,920
    $12,574
  • MN
    $1,143
    $1,674
    $2,778
  • MO
    $936
    $1,493
    $2,270
  • MS
    $906
    $1,310
    $1,867
  • MT
    $941
    $1,399
    $2,070
  • NC
    $721
    $875
    $1,024
  • ND
    $604
    $923
    $1,360
  • NE
    $661
    $1,002
    $1,442
  • NH
    $641
    $904
    $1,274
  • NJ
    $1,312
    $2,151
    $3,413
  • NM
    $1,019
    $1,438
    $2,115
  • NV
    $1,669
    $2,394
    $3,430
  • NY
    $3,927
    $6,307
    $10,640
  • OH
    $595
    $873
    $1,283
  • OK
    $1,064
    $1,515
    $2,146
  • OR
    $853
    $1,217
    $1,699
  • PA
    $1,250
    $1,912
    $2,871
  • RI
    $1,568
    $2,386
    $3,244
  • SC
    $898
    $1,342
    $1,858
  • SD
    $655
    $912
    $1,243
  • TN
    $826
    $1,241
    $1,897
  • TX
    $1,023
    $1,596
    $2,344
  • UT
    $906
    $1,479
    $2,209
  • VA
    $633
    $905
    $1,263
  • VT
    $633
    $975
    $1,443
  • WA
    $1,057
    $1,495
    $2,073
  • WI
    $705
    $1,042
    $1,625
  • WV
    $817
    $1,201
    $1,753
  • WY
    $713
    $980
    $1,368
  • $1,692
    $2,587
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Full coverage car insurance includes liability coverage along with collision and comprehensive insurance.

What Is Full Coverage Car Insurance?

Before looking for a full coverage car insurance policy, it’s important to note that this isn’t a specific type of auto insurance. It’s a combination of different types of insurance.

In most cases, a full coverage policy is a combination of liability coverage along with collision and comprehensive insurance.

Definition of Collision & Comprehensive Insurance

accident2
Collision insurance:
  • Collision insurance covers damages due to a collision with another vehicle or fixed structure, such as a lamp post, tree or telephone pole.
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Comprehensive insurance:
  • Comprehensive insurance covers damages from non-collision events and those that are outside of your control, such as weather, vandalism, theft or animal-related accidents.

Full Coverage Car Insurance Add-Ons

The annual cost of your policy will depend on the coverage types you include. The cheapest full coverage car insurance only covers liability, comprehensive, and collision damages. You can opt to add other types of insurance to fully protect your vehicle. Below are some of them.

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    Personal Insurance Protection

    Personal insurance protection (PIP) covers medical expenses for injuries you or your passengers sustain in the event of an accident, regardless of who’s at fault. PIP is required in several states

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    Uninsured & Underinsured Motorist Coverage

    This type of coverage pays for the repair of your vehicle or medical expenses due to injuries caused by an individual who is either not insured or doesn’t have enough coverage. Uninsured or underinsured motorist coverage is required in 20 states and the District of Columbia.

  • This is an icon

    Emergency Roadside Assistance

    Liability, comprehensive and collision coverage usually don’t include roadside assistance, but insurance companies may offer this coverage as an add-on to cover car breakdowns.

  • This is an icon

    Custom Parts Insurance

    Standard auto insurance policies typically don’t cover modifications to a vehicle. Getting custom parts insurance may be necessary if you want to have coverage for the repair or replacement of your customizations.

Should You Get Full Coverage Insurance?

If you’re concerned about protecting the value of your car, you may want to consider full coverage car insurance. This is especially beneficial if your car is new. If the vehicle is too valuable and you can’t afford to pay for repairs out-of-pocket, a full coverage policy may be right for you.

That said, there are cases when certain coverages may no longer be a good idea. For instance, you may want to drop collision and comprehensive coverage if the insurance premiums are more than 10% of the car’s value.

Frequently Asked Questions

The best type of coverage depends on your specific needs and circumstances. Understanding full coverage can help you make an informed decision. Here are some frequently asked questions on the topic.

About the Author


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Mark Fitzpatrick is a senior content manager with MoneyGeek specializing in insurance. Mark has years of experience analyzing the insurance market and creating original research and content. He graduated from Boston College with a Bachelor of Arts and Johns Hopkins University with a Master of Arts.