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Compound Interest Calculator

Estimate your savings or spending through compound interest. Enter your initial amount, contributions, rate of return and years of growth to see how your balance increases over time.

After 10 years, your total balance is $29,542
After 10 years, 
your total balance is 
$29,542
Growth Over Time
Initial Amount
Total Contributions
Total Interest Earned
Totals by Source
Initial Amount:
$5,000
Total Contributions:
$18,000
Total Interest Earned:
$6,542
Compound Interest Table
YearStarting BalanceAnnual ContributionsCumulative ContributionsInterest EarnedCumulative InterestTotal Balance
1$5,000$1,800$1,800$237$237$7,037
2$7,037$1,800$3,600$320$557$9,157
3$9,157$1,800$5,400$406$964$11,364
4$11,364$1,800$7,200$496$1,460$13,660
5$13,660$1,800$9,000$590$2,050$16,050
6$16,050$1,800$10,800$687$2,737$18,537
7$18,537$1,800$12,600$789$3,526$21,126
8$21,126$1,800$14,400$894$4,420$23,820
9$23,820$1,800$16,200$1,004$5,424$26,624
10$26,624$1,800$18,000$1,118$6,542$29,542

What Is Compound Interest?

Compound interest is the formal name for the snowball effect in finance, where an initial amount grows upon itself and gains more and more momentum over time. It is a powerful tool that can work in your favor when saving, or prolong repayment for debts. Compound interest is often referred to as “interest on interest” because interest accrued is reinvested or compounded along with your principal balance. It is the interest earned on both the initial sum combined with interest earned on already accrued returns.

When saving and investing, this means that your wealth grows by earning investment returns on your initial balance and then reinvesting the returns. However, when you have debt, compound interest can work against you. The amount due increases as the interest grows on top of both the initial amount borrowed and accrued interest.

Compound interest is often calculated on investments such as retirement and education savings, along with money owed, like credit card debt. Interest rates on credit card and other debts tend to be high, which means that the amount owed can compound quickly. It's important to understand how compound interest works so you can find a balance between paying down debt and investing money.

Simple Interest vs. Compound Interest

Simple interest is when interest is gained only on the principal amount. In this scenario, interest earned is not reinvested. If you were to gain 10% annual interest on $100, for example, the total amount earned per year would be $10. At the end of the year, you’d have $110: the initial $100, plus $10 of interest. After two years, you’d have $120. After 20 years, you’d have $300.

Compound interest, on the other hand, puts that $10 in interest to work to continue to earn more money. During the second year, instead of earning interest on just the principal of $100, you’d earn interest on $110, meaning that your balance after two years is $121. While this is a small difference initially, it can add up significantly when compounded over time. After 20 years, the investment will have grown to $673 instead of $300 through simple interest.

You can use compound interest to save money faster, but if you have compound interest on your debts, you’ll lose money more quickly, too. Interest may compound on a daily, monthly, annual or continuous schedule. The more frequently the sum is compounded, the faster it will grow.

How Compound Interest Works

Compound interest allows investments to work in your favor. The earlier you start saving money, the better. But the longer you take to pay off your compound interest debts, the higher they will become.

Compound interest is often compared to a snowball that grows over time. Much like a snowball at the top of a hill, compound interest grows your balances a small amount at first. Like the snowball rolling down the hill, as your wealth grows, it picks up momentum growing by a larger amount each period. The longer the amount of time, or the steeper the hill, the larger the snowball or sum of money will grow.

In terms of debt, compound interest can be like a pest problem. Let’s say you find two bed bugs in your room. You could get rid of them now, but instead, you wait a few days to take care of them. Then you discover that there are now dozens of bed bugs in your room. If you had taken care of the bed bugs right away, they wouldn’t have been able to multiply at such a rate.

With compound interest investments, it’s better to wait and allow these investments to grow, but with money you owe, it’s usually best to pay down debt as quickly as possible — especially if your interest rate is high.

How Does Compound Interest Grow Over Time?

Compound interest can grow exponentially over time. For example, let’s say you invest $500 at an 8% annual return. Over five years, this is how much cumulative interest you will earn if the interest is compounded monthly:

  • Year one: $42
  • Year two: $86
  • Year three: $135
  • Year four: $188
  • Year five: $245

How to Calculate Compound Interest

With the compound interest formula, you can determine how much interest you will accrue on the initial investment or debt. You only need to know how much your principal balance is, the interest rate, the number of times your interest will be compounded over each time period, and the total number of time periods.

Applying the Formula for Compound Interest

The compound interest formula is:

A = P (1 + r/n)^(nt)

where:

  • P is the initial principal balance
  • r is the interest rate (typically, this is an annual rate)
  • n is the number of times interest compounds during each time period
  • t is the number of time periods
  • A is the ending balance, including the compounded interest

To calculate only the compound interest portion (CI), the above formula can be modified by subtracting the initial principal (P):

CI = P((1+r/n)^(nt)-1)

where:

  • CI is the compound interest earned

To calculate the ending balance with ongoing contributions (c), we add a term that calculates the value of ongoing contributions to the principal balance.

A = P(1+r/n)^(nt)+c[((1+r/n)^(nt)-1)/(r/n)]

Where:

  • c is the amount of the periodic contribution

MoneyGeek’s Compound Interest Calculation

MoneyGeek’s compound interest calculator calculates compound interest using the above formulas. If you have selected monthly contributions in the calculator, the calculator utilizes monthly compounding, even if the monthly contribution is set to zero. If the contribution frequency is annual, annual compounding is utilized, again if the annual contribution is set to zero.

How to Use MoneyGeek’s Compound Interest Calculator

The MoneyGeek compound interest calculator is simple to use and understand. Instead of using the compound interest formula, all you have to do is plug in your numbers and information about the interest. You can utilize this tool to determine how much you will owe in interest on your debt or estimate how much you will earn in interest on your investments.

Enter Your Initial Amount

Start by entering the principal amount of your debt or investment. If you’re investing $500, for example, type that number in the box.

Set Monthly or Annual Contributions

This is how much you’re going to contribute to your investment or pay off your debt. For instance, if you’re investing an additional $20 a year, enter that figure into the calculator and select “Annually.” If you plan to pay $20 toward your debt each month, add that number and select “Monthly.” Try changing the dollar amounts up or down to see what happens to the ending balances.

Estimate Your Rate of Return

This is where you enter how much compound interest you expect to receive on an investment or pay on a debt. If you have an 8% interest rate, you will enter that here. The rate of return on many investments is speculative, so entering an average number can give you an idea of how much you’ll earn over time. The rate of return you earn on your investments can make a big difference. See what the change in your balance is if you increase or decrease your rate of return by 1 or 2 percentage points.

Set the Number of Years of Growth

Enter the number of years you plan to keep your money in an investment or how long you will take to pay off your debt. For example, let’s say you won’t touch your investment for five years, so enter five in that box. Try doubling your investment period: How much would you earn if you held it twice as long?

Use the Bar Chart to Explore Growth Over Time

With the compound interest calculator, you can switch the view to see a comprehensive breakdown in different formats. The initial bar chart showcases how compound interest grows over time on top of your principal amount.

Examine the Totals by Source Pie Chart

The MoneyGeek compound interest calculator uses a pie chart to show you the initial amount you contributed in purple, the total interest you earned in green and your total contributions in blue.

Review the Table View

Just click the compound interest table on the right, and you’ll see each year, your starting balance, your annual contributions, cumulative contributions, interest earned, cumulative interest and total balance. You can even see how much you’d earn if you kept saving at that rate, or how much you’d be charged in compound interest if you wanted to pay off your debt.

Frequently Asked Questions About Compound Interest


How does the rule of 72 work?This is an icon

The rule of 72 is a formula you can use to see how long it will take for your investment to double when you factor in the rate of return. The rule of 72 can be used if you’d like to quickly estimate the ending balance without using the more complex compound interest formula. The formula is:

72 ÷ compound annual interest rate (without the %) = the number of years

Using the rule of 72, you would estimate that an investment with a 5% compound interest rate would double in 14 years (72/5).

What is the time value of money?This is an icon

Time value of money is a concept that money received right now is worth more than the same amount received in the future because of its potential to grow. This concept can be understood with a question: If someone was going to pay you $100 today, how much more would they have to give you if they delayed the payment by a month? Because of the lost earning potential, you’d want more than $100 in the future. Investors and economists often think about the time value of money as the risk-free return on money one could get over a period of time.

What is the compound annual growth rate (CAGR)?This is an icon

Because many investments do not pay a consistent interest rate, but are rather the average of a fluctuating market, the compound annual growth rate (CAGR) assumes compound growth over time to provide a projected rate of return.

This formula is the projected rate of return on an asset or investment, even if it does not explicitly pay compounded interest. The CAGR is a form of the compound interest formula, but rearranged algebraically to solve for the interest rate using the beginning balance, ending balance and number of periods.

How can compound interest work against you? This is an icon

Compound interest works against you if you have debts. The longer you take to pay off your debts, the higher your compounding interest will be, and you’ll end up paying back much more in the end.

What’s the difference between daily, monthly and annual compounding?This is an icon

With daily compound interest, you will earn (or be charged) compound interest every day. With monthly, you’ll earn (or be charged) interest each month, and with annual, you’ll earn (or be charged) every year. Due to the way the compound interest formula works, the more frequently you compound, the more interest earned (or charged).

How do you know if your interest is being compounded?This is an icon

You can look at your loan or credit card disclaimer to figure out if your interest is being compounded and at what rate.

Expert Insight on Compound Interest

MoneyGeek spoke with academic experts and industry leaders on compound interest to see what they had to say. The views expressed are the opinions and insight of the individual contributors.

  1. What Are Some of the Uses of Compound Interest?

    One important use of compound interest is the ability to make your money grow faster.

    Compound interest is basically paying or earning interest on top of previously earned interest. You can use compound interest to your advantage to help your savings, retirement and other accounts grow, including a certificate of deposit (CD) or money market account. The longer your money compounds before you withdraw it, the more money you’ll have. So, the earlier you start saving, the better!

    Depositing funds into a savings account allows you to collect interest upon interest based on the amount you deposited--as well as based on the rate and how often interest is compounded. With larger investments, over time, your savings can grow quickly with the effect of compound interest. Mortgage loans are often financed with compound interest, meaning the bank charges interest to the principal amount as well as any prior interest accrued. Similarly, credit cards and cash loans usually charge compounded interest, making it more costly to pay back than expected with time if you don’t account for the compounding interest. Vehicle loans and company production equipment loans often include compound interest as well.

    Compound interest can be used to your benefit, as with savings accounts. It can also be used in a way that works against you, such as with credit card and student loan debt.

    The concept of interest has a long history and some important socio-cultural aspects to it. Simple “interest” is just the idea that if you lend (or borrow) money to an individual or a firm, you should be paid back more than the amount loaned because you could have been using that money in some other manner that would have increased its value. While the concept of interest is widely accepted to our 21st Century global society, “usery” was once considered immoral. In the Merchant of Venice, Shakespeare’s depiction of Shylock as a wealthy outsider who lent out money for his own financial return was xenophobic, exemplifying negative social views on charging interest on loans at the time. Compound interest is calculated by added interest earned to the original loan moving forward so that subsequent gains are based on an increasing amount of money. Although it is hard to believe he wasn’t talking about the forces of the Universe rather than of economies, Einstein is quoted as saying that compound interest is “the most powerful force in the universe.” The first written evidence of compound interest dates roughly to 2400 BC and was based on non-monetary currencies such as seeds or livestock. Seeds yielded produce which could then be harvested and returned with interest. Similarly, animals could be returned with offspring as interest. As opposed to simple interest, compound interest allows the lender to garner higher returns by receiving interest on the principal amount plus the interest previously earned. Simple interest is an additive process, while compounding interest is a geometric or multiplicative process (think the seasonal flu versus Covid-19). As a result, compound interest encourages those who save money to invest in the market. The potential return from compound interest makes taking a risk with capital resources worthwhile. Think of compound interest as grease in the wheels of capitalism.

    The way I like to put this to my students (and even my clients) is that compound interest is the way we put money to work for us. When we hire people, we expect that for the money we pay them they will cause a return in excess of their salary, and that over time that excess over their salary grows as they gain experience and proficiency. I also like to tell my students that all compound interest works as a function of debt — without exception. That means whether I’m “investing” or borrowing — someone is owed money — and the way we put that debt to work making money is through compounding interest. Think about it — if I take out a home loan, I’m paying interest, but the truth is that the bank “invested” money in my house and the “work” that is done by that debt is the compounding interest. On the other hand, if I’m investing (in anything), I’m either directly (capital investment, stocks) or indirectly (bonds, mutual funds, savings banks) lending my money to businesses for their operations, and the compounding interest is the way they’re paying me … my money goes to work.

    Compound interest is useful as a financial concept as it relates to both personal investment (earning more money over time) and personal expenditures (owing more money over time). Young investors are often surprised at how the value of their earlier investments counts for a much greater proportion of their overall retirement savings. The longer your savings are reinvested to continue generating additional earnings, the more contributory power they have over your entire financial portfolio. The reverse is also true. The longer you maintain an open credit card balance, the greater the exposure for the interest on your debt to accrue into an increasingly larger portion of the total amount owed. Remember, your debt obligation is simply the issuing bank’s financial investment.

  2. What do volatility and rate of return have to do with compound interest?

    Resist the urge to look at your investment accounts too often, which can lead to making changes based on fear and stress. This has been identified in the field of behavioral finance as a negative response that we all too often succumb to. The problem happens when we cannot stomach the volatility (ups and downs) of our investments, and we are tempted to change our investments when the markets are low, causing us to lose out on future potential growth and compounding.

    Volatility is the price changes of an investment, which may fluctuate within a year. Given a specific time period, the rate of return is the ratio of the net loss or gain of an investment to the initial investment, written as a percentage. Even if two funds have the same rate of return in, say, an 8-year period, one account may fluctuate much more over that time if the volatility is high. Should the volatility be high and the rate of return varies more often annually, the compound returns will decrease.

    Volatility is how much the interest rate can change over the course of the year. For example, an investment with +8% and -5% rates has more volatility than a rate between +4% and -1%. Usually, the higher the rate of volatility, the higher the potential rate of return. For example, though shares of publicly traded companies have more volatility than government bonds, they also have a potential higher rate of return.

    The rate of return is how much interest the lender receives on their loan. It is essentially the price of money and varies depending on who is loaning the money, how much is being loaned, and over what period of time the lender expects a return on that loan. This rate is not constant. Volatility is the extent to which the rate of return changes and speaks to the unknown or the risk of any investment. Because compound interest relies on what was earned in the prior time period, volatility in the rate of return can affect all future gains. If, for example, the interest rate drops in the first period, less interest will be earned that period. Compound interest has earnings from period 2 depend on period 1. The more volatile the interest rate, the more unpredictable the returns on an investment.

    By volatility, we mean how stable is the market and how sure can we be about a rate of return? This really pertains to the economic environment. The way I like to help my students and clients about the concept of volatility is gardening. In gardening, if all the conditions are right, my garden grows beautifully. The soil is rich, there’s just the right amount of sun and rain. During the growing season, the temperature never goes to extremes, and wind is low. But what if any of these conditions change? Then the rate at which my garden grows changes. Moreover, if a storm comes along, the wind and rain may wash some of the garden away (or maybe even all of it). So too with the economy, conditions must be right for my investment to see a good rate of return. If people are not buying, or if there is a recall of a product from the company, or (as we saw) the economy shuts down, the growth isn’t there. When that happens the rate of return slows. As a result, while I may (or may not) be making money, when the rate is slower it takes longer for the money to grow — or like my garden to recover. The other thing I’d say about volatility and rate of return is this — I never look at how a company has done in the last few months, or even in the last year as my main data point for whether I should have my money there. Rather, the question is how has the company weathered several years — like 20? What is their average rate of return? If it’s better than 10%, I’d be in. Why? Because there are always storms. The question is whether the ‘gardener’ has learned how to prepare for and recover from the inevitable storms that come.

    As an investor, compound interest helps amplify the impact of your annual rate of return. For example, let’s say you invest $1,000 into a stock, and you are fortunate that it yields a 1-year rate of return of 10%. At the end of the first year, you now have $1,100 in your portfolio. Let’s further assume that during the second year you are equally fortunate to yield another 10% rate of return. You now have $1,210 in your portfolio. That ‘extra’ $10 is the result of compounding. The investment gain from your first year is now contributing toward your future benefit! It gets even better, because compound interest also buffers against the impact of market volatility. Let’s assume that during the third year, your stock yields a -10% rate of return. You would have $1,089 in your portfolio, but that is $9 better than the $1,080 you would have without taking into consideration the impact of compounding.

  3. How can compound interest affect you in a negative way (i.e., credit cards)?

    Compound interest can make it more difficult to pay off debt because interest is added to the loan, and unless you are making a decent size payment, you could be paying on the debt for a long time. I demonstrate this to my students by asking them to calculate the time it takes to pay off a credit card with very small payments. I get some strange looks when the calculator gives them an error. Some students assume I messed up. However, the correct answer is infinity, the debt will never be paid off because the payment I gave them was so small it does not even cover the interest for the month. In other words, the credit card debt grows over time instead of getting smaller. This is an extreme example, but it makes the point that compound interest can be dangerous if the debt is not handled appropriately.

    If you have a savings or investment account, compounding interest can be an amazing tool that will help your savings increase. On the other hand, if you have a loan with compounding interest, you are actually paying interest on top of interest. Because of this, it can feel like you are never paying down that high-interest credit card balance. Work on paying more than the minimum due, so you are paying the loan off faster and therefore paying less in interest.

    Credit card companies often compound account interest daily, which means that you are not only paying interest on the amount charged to the credit card over time, but also on the interest accrued. Vehicle, cash, and mortgage loans also often see compound interest as well. Compound interest increases debt quickly, depending on the amount loaned.

    Many people are not aware of student loan interest rates. If you're using a federal loan, the good news is that almost all of them use simple interest. This means the rate of interest is only applied to the principal, not the interest itself. This means that the interest cost stays constant over the lifetime of the loan. However, compounding can still be a factor even with simple interest loans. In the case of forbearance or consolidation, the bank will add interest on top of your principal. This process, capitalization, will increase the overall amount you pay going forward. This generally happens after nonpayment periods such as deferment, when you're in school, and the grace period. The primary way to avoid this is to pay the interest each month on your loans, even while you're in school.

    Compound interest can take a bite out of your finances. Credit cards provide an easy way to borrow money, but the cost reflects that ease. While many credit cards report the annual interest rate, the fine print tells you how often the company calculates that interest. Daily compounding means that the credit card company calculates the interest one incurs daily and adds that to the balance of the card. A $1,000 balance on a credit card that charges 20 percent annually is $200. A $1,000 balance for a company that compounds daily would change one day’s worth of interest: 20% APR / 365 days = 0.05, which is about $54 that would be added to your balance on the first day of the loan (increasing every day after that). Even if compounded only monthly, that’s some quick digging on a soon-to-be deep hole.

    Compound interest is slow and sneaky. It is easy to dismiss making a full payment on your credit card, because the monthly interest charge seems relatively small. What you may not realize is that the monthly interest charge now added to your overall balance will continue to accrue further compounded interest until the balance is paid in its entirety. On a grander scale, paying off a mortgage for a home is the same concept. You typically pay far more in interest due to compounding over the term of the mortgage than the principle of the mortgage itself. And that’s a situation where the interest rates are quite low, perhaps less than 5%. When compounding is working against you with an unpaid credit card debt, the interest rates are often in excess of 30%. It can take less than three years for your debt to double and under a year longer to triple from its original balance.

  4. How can it affect you in a positive way (i.e., savings and investments)?

    If money compounds regularly, then the principle and the interest earn interest regularly, amplifying your efforts to save for financial goals. Each time interest is paid but left in the account, it earns interest a well. This is a great way to help reach your financial goals.

    One of the ways you can make compound interest work in your favor is to open at least one savings/investment account and start adding to it regularly. Even if you’re only able to put aside a small amount each month towards saving, the “snowball” effect of compound interest means your savings continue to grow month-over-month, year-over-year – even if you never contribute another cent past today.

    Savings accounts and investments with compound interest benefit the investor. Not only is the investor earning interest on the amount invested, but also on the interest accrued, meaning the return at the end of the time period will be significantly greater with larger investments over time.

    The power of time and compound growth can make your money work for you. If you put your money into a savings account with around a 10% return, that return will start to build on itself due to compound interest. Therefore, if you start with $50, after a year, you'll have $55. Then, the $5 interest you earned will continue to earn interest, making you more money in the long run.

    The reverse is true for savings and investments. Compound interest makes an investment grow geometrically.

    One way to have compounding interest working for you is to pay your debts quickly and let the threat of growing debt fuel your payment rate – they can only make money as long as you owe them! And honestly, since many debts (like credit cards) have a higher interest rate that you are going to be paying, investing while in debt doesn’t make much sense because you’re shoveling against the tide a bit. That said, I don’t have a choice. The school where I teach now takes 7% of my money each month and puts it into an investment for me … But for me, this is a sweet deal because they match that contribution — which means I’m getting 100% return before I even see what the investment company is doing! So my forced retirement funding is my 7% doubled plus the rate of return from the company — that means this year (in a bad storm) it has been 115%!

    Compound interest can work powerfully to your benefit, especially if you commit to a long-term investment strategy and start saving early in your life. It is common for many investors to become discouraged at the seemingly small annual gains made through conservative growth-oriented investment strategies. Undisciplined investors treat financial markets like a casino, striving to double their money every year. That is neither realistic nor safe. The value and excitement from compound interest takes years, decades actually, to really become interesting. Whereas a dollar invested today at a 10% annual rate of return may only yield a few cents of return at the end of a single year, invested over a 50-year period would yield over $100 or over a 100-year period would yield over $10,000. Granted, that doesn’t adjust for inflation, but the power of compound interest is truly remarkable.

  5. If planning your savings using compound interest, how should you think about the rate of return/assumption to include in your plans?

    The higher the interest rate, the bigger the impact compound interest has. Also, the longer you save, the bigger the impact compound interest has. This is why you may have heard the recommendation to start saving as soon as you can. Resist the urge to pull out the interest you earn in your savings and investment accounts. Some people think of interest as a paycheck that they can withdraw and spend. However, this defeats the purpose of compound interest because now your interest cannot earn interest and your money will grow more slowly.

    The rate of return is the best to look at for a set time period for compound interest, regardless of volatility. This allows for the fluctuation over the given period of time to predict the ratio of the amount the investor will receive to the original investment, written as a percentage.

    When planning your savings, try to take inflation into account when looking at a rate. The average rate of inflation is between 1.4% and 4%, so a 10% return in a year with 2% inflation would only be an 8% return. You should also consider your age and how long you have to invest. The younger you are, the more volatility you can take on because the stock market tends to bounce back.

    The “rule of 7” used to be commonplace. It was the idea that you could expect your investment to double every seven years. The problem with this rule is that it assumed the historical average stock market return of 10%. Even with compound interest, lower rates result in lower returns, and macroeconomists are warning us that global economic growth will not be as fast this century. This should, however, not dissuade saving and investing. Awareness of the rate of return and the volatility of that return can help investors plan.

    Assume storms will come. Realize that investing is a long-term thing and assume that you will likely see a rate of return that is approximately what the company has done over the last 20 years. If you want to really be careful/conservative – which some people might want to do if they are getting closer to retirement, plan on a slightly lower rate of return than what the company has done. That may help you predict better how much of your own money you need to sink into the fund to get the result you want. Also, if you really want to make money in investing — be the lender not the borrower ever! Today, I have no credit cards, 2 debit cards, my debt is shrinking, my home is nearly paid off and my retirement fund is growing! I’m not just the President of Raising Hope Financial Coach, I’m also my own client (with help from a team of coaches).

    As with any investment strategy, it is important to develop a team of advisors to work with you to triangulate your financial goals, objectives, and appetite for risk. Even as an expert in the fields of finance and management, I still depend on a team of advisors to check my thinking, analyze potential risk exposures, and benchmark my portfolio against objective metrics. Investing is always a team sport. As your investment strategy relates to using compound interest, the key consideration is time. Time is the only necessary ingredient for compound interest to work its magic. A decade isn’t nearly a long enough time horizon. While everyone can gain from leveraging compound interest, the true power will benefit those young investors willing to sacrifice by saving early in their career to yield tremendous benefits at retirement. For those fortunate few able to consider an even longer time horizon, consider this: a new parent invests just $1,000 in a long-term portfolio, expecting it to serve as a retirement benefit for their future grandchild 100 years in the future. Through the power of compound interest, that relatively modest investment would facilitate a reasonable annual middle-class income for the entirety of their grandchild’s retirement. That’s the power of compound interest!


  • Jacob Tenney
    Jacob TenneyAssistant Professor and Director of Financial Planning
    Stacey Black
    Stacey BlackLead Financial Educator
    Arash Fayz
    Arash FayzCo-Founder and Executive Director at LA Tutors 123
    Grant Aldrich
    Grant AldrichCEO and Founder
    Dr. Lisa Giddings
    Dr. Lisa GiddingsAssociate Professor of Economics at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
    Larry Duffany
    Larry DuffanyPrincipal Owner, Raising Hope Financial Coach
  • Joshua A. Gerlick
    Joshua A. GerlickDoctor of Management Fowler Fellow; Doctor of Management Nonprofit Management Fellow (Case Western Reserve University)
  • Jacob Tenney
    Jacob TenneyAssistant Professor and Director of Financial Planning
    Stacey Black
    Stacey BlackLead Financial Educator
    Arash Fayz
    Arash FayzCo-Founder and Executive Director at LA Tutors 123
    Grant Aldrich
    Grant AldrichCEO and Founder
    Dr. Lisa Giddings
    Dr. Lisa GiddingsAssociate Professor of Economics at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
    Larry Duffany
    Larry DuffanyPrincipal Owner, Raising Hope Financial Coach
  • Joshua A. Gerlick
    Joshua A. GerlickDoctor of Management Fowler Fellow; Doctor of Management Nonprofit Management Fellow (Case Western Reserve University)
  • Jacob Tenney
    Jacob TenneyAssistant Professor and Director of Financial Planning
    Stacey Black
    Stacey BlackLead Financial Educator
    Arash Fayz
    Arash FayzCo-Founder and Executive Director at LA Tutors 123
    Grant Aldrich
    Grant AldrichCEO and Founder
    Dr. Lisa Giddings
    Dr. Lisa GiddingsAssociate Professor of Economics at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
    Larry Duffany
    Larry DuffanyPrincipal Owner, Raising Hope Financial Coach
  • Joshua A. Gerlick
    Joshua A. GerlickDoctor of Management Fowler Fellow; Doctor of Management Nonprofit Management Fellow (Case Western Reserve University)
  • Jacob Tenney
    Jacob TenneyAssistant Professor and Director of Financial Planning
    Stacey Black
    Stacey BlackLead Financial Educator
    Arash Fayz
    Arash FayzCo-Founder and Executive Director at LA Tutors 123
    Grant Aldrich
    Grant AldrichCEO and Founder
    Dr. Lisa Giddings
    Dr. Lisa GiddingsAssociate Professor of Economics at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
    Larry Duffany
    Larry DuffanyPrincipal Owner, Raising Hope Financial Coach
  • Joshua A. Gerlick
    Joshua A. GerlickDoctor of Management Fowler Fellow; Doctor of Management Nonprofit Management Fellow (Case Western Reserve University)
  • Jacob Tenney
    Jacob TenneyAssistant Professor and Director of Financial Planning
    Stacey Black
    Stacey BlackLead Financial Educator
    Arash Fayz
    Arash FayzCo-Founder and Executive Director at LA Tutors 123
    Grant Aldrich
    Grant AldrichCEO and Founder
    Dr. Lisa Giddings
    Dr. Lisa GiddingsAssociate Professor of Economics at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
    Larry Duffany
    Larry DuffanyPrincipal Owner, Raising Hope Financial Coach
  • Joshua A. Gerlick
    Joshua A. GerlickDoctor of Management Fowler Fellow; Doctor of Management Nonprofit Management Fellow (Case Western Reserve University)
  • Jacob Tenney
    Jacob TenneyAssistant Professor and Director of Financial Planning
    Stacey Black
    Stacey BlackLead Financial Educator
    Arash Fayz
    Arash FayzCo-Founder and Executive Director at LA Tutors 123
    Grant Aldrich
    Grant AldrichCEO and Founder
    Dr. Lisa Giddings
    Dr. Lisa GiddingsAssociate Professor of Economics at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
    Larry Duffany
    Larry DuffanyPrincipal Owner, Raising Hope Financial Coach
  • Joshua A. Gerlick
    Joshua A. GerlickDoctor of Management Fowler Fellow; Doctor of Management Nonprofit Management Fellow (Case Western Reserve University)
  • Jacob Tenney
    Jacob TenneyAssistant Professor and Director of Financial Planning
    Stacey Black
    Stacey BlackLead Financial Educator
    Arash Fayz
    Arash FayzCo-Founder and Executive Director at LA Tutors 123
    Grant Aldrich
    Grant AldrichCEO and Founder
    Dr. Lisa Giddings
    Dr. Lisa GiddingsAssociate Professor of Economics at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
    Larry Duffany
    Larry DuffanyPrincipal Owner, Raising Hope Financial Coach
  • Joshua A. Gerlick
    Joshua A. GerlickDoctor of Management Fowler Fellow; Doctor of Management Nonprofit Management Fellow (Case Western Reserve University)