To find the best pet insurance for dogs and cats, MoneyGeek compared data and real quotes to determine the best affordable pet insurance plans currently offered for your furry, scaly and feathered companions. We also provide details on how pet insurance works, what the best pet insurance plans offer and how you can choose the right coverage for your pet.

Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...

Best Pet Insurance Plans Summary

Here's a snapshot of the best pet insurance companies’ plan options and available discounts to help you choose the right coverage for your pet and budget.

Company
Coverage Options
Deductible Options
Reimbursement Options
Available Discounts

Spot
Best Overall

  • $2,500
  • $3,000
  • $4,000
  • $5,000
  • $7,000
  • $10,000
  • Unlimited
  • $100
  • $250
  • $500
  • $750
  • $1,000
  • 70%
  • 80%
  • 90%
  • 10% multi-pet
  • 10% employee
    benefits discount

Pets Best
Best Cheap Pet
Insurance

  • $5,000
  • Unlimited
  • $50
  • $100
  • $200
  • $250
  • $500
  • $1,000
  • 70%
  • 80%
  • 90%
  • 5% multi-pet

Trupanion
Best High-End
Plan

  • Unlimited
  • $0–$1,000
  • 90%

Nationwide
Best Policies for
Wellness Add-On

  • $10,000 (whole
    pet only)
  • Defined annual
    benefits per condition
  • $250
  • 50% (whole
    pet only)
  • 70% (whole
    pet only)
  • 5% multi-pet
  • 5% current
    Nationwide insureds

Figo
Best for Cats

  • $5,000
  • $10,000
  • Unlimited
  • $100
  • $250
  • $500
  • $750
  • 70%
  • 80%
  • 90%
  • 100%
  • Varies by state

Best Pet Insurance Companies by State

Not all pet insurance companies offer coverage in every state, and premiums can vary depending on your location. The table below explores MoneyGeek's top picks for pet insurance providers in each state.

The Best Pet Insurance Providers in Every State
Loading...

How Much Do the Best Pet Insurance Policies Cost?

When choosing the best pet insurance plans for your needs, comparing coverage options can help you find the right plan to fit your budget. The tables below show sample rates for plan options with low, average and high coverage for dogs. In the last table, you can see average coverage rates for the best pet insurance for cats. The younger your pet is when you enroll them, the cheaper your pet insurance will be and the less likely they’ll have pre-existing conditions excluded from coverage.

Low Coverage ($5k Max, 80%, $500) Pet Insurance Premium for Dogs
Loading...
Average Coverage ($10k / $250 / 80%) Pet Insurance Premium for Dogs
Loading...
Average Coverage ($10k / $250 / 80%) Pet Insurance Premium for Cats
Loading...

What Factors Impact Your Policy Cost

Just like other forms of insurance, certain factors impact how much you’ll pay for pet insurance. Understanding how insurers create their quotes can help you choose the best policy for your needs.

1
Coverage Levels

The more coverage you choose, the more you’ll pay for it. Choosing a higher deductible will lower your premium, but you’ll have to pay more out of pocket. While unlimited coverage costs the most, you could end up saving over lower plans if your pet has a major accident or illness.

2
Your Pet's Age

Most pets can be insured as young as eight weeks, and the oldest they can be insured varies by company. The younger your pet is, the cheaper your coverage will be. With pet insurance, your rate can increase each year with your pet’s age.

3
Your Pet's Breed

Your pet's breed can also impact how much you pay. Genetics and adult size play a significant role in health issues. For instance, large dog breeds are more susceptible to heart and hip conditions, making them riskier to insure. Cats cost less to insure than dogs, with the average monthly cost for comprehensive coverage at $28.48 per month for cats and $49.51 for dogs, according to the NAPHIA survey.

4
Your Location

Pet insurance rates are also based on veterinary care costs in your area. Those living in rural areas usually pay less for pet insurance than those living in urban and suburban areas.

How Does Pet Insurance Work?

With the best pet insurance plans, you can go to any vet you want and get reimbursed for covered claims. When you buy pet insurance, you pay monthly or annual premiums, and the insurance company reimburses you for accidents, illnesses and wellness visits based on your coverage limits. Pet insurance is typically on a reimbursement model, which means you pay the vet at checkout and then submit your invoice for reimbursement from the company.

Loading...

What Do the Best Pet Insurance Plans Cover?

Pet insurance coverage varies by company, even for the best pet insurance plans. Accident-only plans only reimburse for accidental injuries, like your pet ingesting poison or a foreign object or getting hit by a car. Comprehensive pet insurance plans include accidents and illnesses, even serious illnesses like cancer.

Treatment is usually covered, including:

  • CT scan
  • MRI
  • X-rays
  • Emergency care
  • Prescription medications
  • Hospitalization
  • Laboratory testing
  • Surgery
Loading...

While some pet insurance plans include wellness benefits, most offer them as add-on coverage. A wellness plan as a standalone policy — or a rider for comprehensive or accident-only coverage — can include:

  • Teeth cleaning
  • Spaying/neutering
  • Vaccines
  • Microchip
  • Urinalysis
  • Deworming
  • Flea, heartworm and tick preventives and testing
  • Exam fees
  • Blood, fecal and parasite exams

How to Choose the Best Pet Insurance Policy?

Choosing the best pet insurance plan can be a daunting task, with so many companies offering pet coverage. Use these tips to help you find the best pet insurance companies offering the coverage you need for your pet.

1
Enroll while your pet is young.

One factor pet insurance companies use to determine your premium is your pet’s age. The younger they are, the better your rates and the less likely they are to have pre-existing health issues that could be excluded from coverage. Older pets may be excluded from coverage or only offered accident coverage.

2
Consider your coverage.

You know your pet best. If they are healthy and not predisposed to genetic or hereditary diseases, accident-only coverage may be the best option. But if you want illness coverage for nose-to-tail protection, it can be a worthwhile investment. A wellness add-on comes with an additional cost but may offer more financial assistance for routine care.

3
Read the fine print.

Pet insurance coverage limits and exclusions vary by company. Most companies offer state-specific sample policies online you can review before purchasing. Before you buy, you should read the fine print to be aware of any coverage gaps that might make another company a better option.

4
Look over reviews and recommendations.

After considering our best pet insurance reviews, go a step further and ask your vet for a recommendation. They can review your pet’s history and help you choose a plan right for you. Friends and family with pet insurance are also great resources to ask for a recommendation.

mglogo icon
MONEYGEEK TIP

Take a look at your pet’s vet history to help you decide the level of coverage that’s right for you. Compare pet insurance quotes with at least three companies to get the cheapest rate for the highest level of coverage. Remember, the best pet insurance companies allow you to make coverage changes at any time, so you aren’t locked into the same levels you enrolled with.

How Much Pet Insurance Coverage Should You Buy?

When determining how much pet insurance coverage to buy, you should first consider the type of pet you have. If you have an indoor cat who only gets seen for routine visits, you may not need the same level of coverage for an active dog who frequents the dog park or regularly goes hiking with you.

Think about how much you can afford to pay for your pet’s care. If you can afford more vet costs, you can save on pet insurance premiums with a higher deductible and lower reimbursement percentage.

While most pet insurance companies offer unlimited annual coverage, this is the most expensive option. Do you really need unlimited coverage each year? Reviewing your pet’s vet history can help you decide if this is the right coverage choice. Choosing a lower annual coverage limit can reduce the premium, and you can change the coverage later if needed.

Also, consider the cost of vet care in your area. The average annual cost of vet care is between $700 and $1,500, with the average office visit costing $50–$250. But an emergency vet visit could cost $3,000 or more and should be covered by pet insurance. While an ear infection may only set you back around $100, a UTI could cost $1,000 or more. And if your pet develops cancer, you may not be able to afford the more than $3,500 it costs for chemotherapy.

Frequently Asked Questions About Pet Insurance

Do you have even more questions about pet insurance? Understanding the answers to the most frequently asked questions about buying and using pet insurance can help you choose the right plan for your pet.

How does pet insurance work, and what does it cover?
What are the best pet insurance companies?
How much does pet insurance cost?
Should you buy pet insurance?
Do veterinarians all take pet insurance?
Does pet insurance cover spaying and neutering?
Does pet insurance cover dental?
Does GEICO have pet insurance?
Does Allstate have pet insurance?
Does USAA have pet insurance?

About Mandy Sleight


Mandy Sleight headshot

Mandy Sleight is a licensed property, casualty, life and health insurance agent with 20 years of experience in the industry. She has worked for major insurance companies like State Farm and Nationwide, and most recently as the Operations Coordinator for a startup employee benefits company.

Sleight holds a business administration and management degree from the University of Baltimore and a master's in business administration from Southern New Hampshire University. She uses her vast knowledge of insurance and personal finance to create easy-to-understand and engaging content to help readers make smarter choices with their budgets and finances.


sources