Does Homeowners Insurance Cover Septic Tanks?

Standard homeowners insurance covers septic tanks. MoneyGeek found that this is only applicable if covered perils, such as theft, fire, snow, lighting, etc., have caused damage to the septic tank. If the damage is due to personal negligence, the insurance company will not pay to repair or replace it.

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Last Updated: 8/2/2022
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Insurance companies generally cover damages to the septic tank under dwelling coverage of a standard homeowners insurance policy. Dwelling coverage protects the physical structure of your home, including the foundation, roofing, front or side porches, attached garage and more.

With dwelling coverage, your insurance company will help repair or replace the structure if it's damaged due to a covered peril.

You don't need to buy extra coverage for septic tanks, as most insurance companies automatically cover them under dwelling coverage of a standard homeowners insurance policy. MoneyGeek recommends shopping for homeowners insurance from different insurers to get the best fit for your needs.

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When Does Homeowners Insurance Cover Septic Tanks?

If a covered peril like a fire or lightning damages your septic tank, your homeowners insurance policy will help you repair or replace it. Typically, homeowners insurance will cover septic tank damage if it's a result of any of the following instances:

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  • A fire in your house damages your septic system in any way.
  • Someone vandalizes your septic tank.
  • A lightning strike causes damage to the septic tank.

Most homeowners insurance policies cover perils that commonly cause damage to the septic tank. However, it's best to read your policy information or contact your insurer to understand which peril they cover.

When Doesn’t Homeowners Insurance Cover Septic Tanks?

Although homeowners insurance generally covers septic tank damage, it's best to avoid making a claim altogether by protecting the tank from damage. You can do so by being mindful of what you flush, not placing your vehicle above the tank and keeping trees away from it.

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How to Protect Your Septic Tank

Although homeowners insurance generally covers septic tank damage, it's best to avoid making a claim altogether by protecting the tank from damage. You can do so by being mindful of what you flush, not placing your vehicle above the tank and keeping trees away from it.

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    Be mindful of what you flush

    If you want your septic tank to function well, avoid flushing down items like household chemicals, paints, paper towels, cigarette butts, oils and grease.

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    Place your vehicle elsewhere

    Since the weight of heavy vehicles can cause damage to the septic tank, it's best to park your cars elsewhere.

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    Keep trees away from the tank

    Watch out for any trees that may be growing near the tank. The tree roots can find their way into the tank, damaging the system from the inside out.

Where to Buy Homeowners Insurance

You can buy homeowners insurance from major insurers, such as State Farm and Hippo. Some regional insurance providers like Lemonade and Toggle are also good choices for a homeowners insurance policy.

However, before you purchase a policy, it's best to compare quotes from different providers to find the right coverage that suits your needs. The average cost of homeowners insurance is $175 per month. However, the actual price may vary depending on how much stuff you own.

You can use MoneyGeek's personal property calculator to estimate your insurance costs based on the value of your personal property.

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About the Author


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Mark Fitzpatrick is a senior content manager with MoneyGeek specializing in insurance. Mark has years of experience analyzing the insurance market and creating original research and content. He graduated from Boston College with a Bachelor of Arts and Johns Hopkins University with a Master of Arts.