MoneyGeek Analysis:

States Where Homeowners & Renters Are Most At-Risk for Hail Damage in 2022

Last Updated: 8/5/2022
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Peak hail season in the U.S. occurs from May to August — are you prepared? Hail can damage your home significantly and result in thousands of dollars of repairs, especially if you don't have adequate, affordable home insurance coverage.

To find the states with the most predicted hail risk in 2022, MoneyGeek analyzed expected annualized losses from hail overall and per capita.

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States With the Most Hail Risk for Homeowners & Renters

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MoneyGeek used data from the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) National Risk Index datasets and calculated annual expected total losses and per capita losses by state to find the states with the highest predicted hail risk in 2022. Our ranking is in order of most to least risk per capita, with the No.1 state having the most risk per capita.

Colorado’s hail risk is the highest in the country. Indeed, Colorado locals are no stranger to hail storms, experiencing an average of 234 hail events per year and $30.13 in per capita losses. In particular, seven of Colorado’s ten most costly hail storms occurred in the Denver Metro area, with the most expensive storm producing $2.3 billion in total damages in 2017.

Following Colorado is Nebraska, with locals experiencing an average of 319 hail storms annually, typically occurring from May to July.

Oklahoma has the third-highest hail risk in the nation, with $21.46 in expected per capita losses and 159 hail incidents reported in 2021 alone.


  • 15. Georgia
    Georgia

    • $4.20Building & Population Losses per Capita
    • $40.7 millionBuilding & Population Losses

  • 14. Mississippi
    Mississippi

    • $4.53Building & Population Losses per Capita
    • $13.4 millionBuilding & Population Losses

  • 13. Wyoming
    Wyoming

    • $4.71Building & Population Losses per Capita
    • $2.7 millionBuilding & Population Losses

  • 12. Arkansas
    Arkansas

    • $4.76Building & Population Losses per Capita
    • $13.9 millionBuilding & Population Losses

  • 11. Wisconsin
    Wisconsin

    • $5.56Building & Population Losses per Capita
    • $31.6 millionBuilding & Population Losses

  • 10. Minnesota
    Minnesota

    • $6.19Building & Population Losses per Capita
    • $32.8 millionBuilding & Population Losses

  • 9. Missouri
    Missouri

    • $8.29Building & Population Losses per Capita
    • $49.7 millionBuilding & Population Losses

  • 8. Iowa
    Iowa

    • $9.10Building & Population Losses per Capita
    • $27.7 millionBuilding & Population Losses

  • 7. Kansas
    Kansas

    • $11.49Building & Population Losses per Capita
    • $32.8 millionBuilding & Population Losses

  • 6. Texas
    Texas

    • $13.46Building & Population Losses per Capita
    • $338.4 millionBuilding & Population Losses

  • 5. North Dakota
    North Dakota

    • $13.69Building & Population Losses per Capita
    • $9.2 millionBuilding & Population Losses

  • 4. South Dakota
    South Dakota

    • $15.57Building & Population Losses per Capita
    • $12.7 millionBuilding & Population Losses

  • 3. Oklahoma
    Oklahoma

    • $21.46Building & Population Losses per Capita
    • $80.5 millionBuilding & Population Losses

  • 2. Nebraska
    Nebraska

    • $27.81Building & Population Losses per Capita
    • $50.8 millionBuilding & Population Losses

  • 1. Colorado
    Colorado

    • $30.13Building & Population Losses per Capita
    • $151.5 millionBuilding & Population Losses

How Homeowners & Renters Can Prepare for Hail

Planning for a hailstorm is crucial to minimizing the damage to your home. Living in a hailstorm-prone area may mean investing in more solid roofing and windows, such as impact-resistant storm shutters and asphalt shingles. Even if you live in a state that only occasionally gets hailstorms, you will still want to prepare by cleaning gutters, repairing roof damages and closing chimneys. These and the following additional tips can help ensure you're ready should a hailstorm hit your home.

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HOW TO PREPARE YOUR HOME & VEHICLE FOR HAILSTORMS

Follow these tips to help you protect your property from hail damage:

  • Evaluate your home’s condition. Take a look at your roof and overall home to ensure no leakages occur. Make sure to have any roof damage repaired as soon as possible.
  • Clear any debris. You can minimize the potential damage to your home by keeping eavestroughs clear of debris and trimming trees and shrubs regularly.
  • Protect assets located outside the home. If you have a vehicle, livestock or pets located outside your home, make sure to find a place to protect them by bringing them inside or to another secure area, if possible.
  • Secure your windows, glass doors and skylights. Cover areas protected by glass with drapes, blinds or window shades to reduce the impact of broken glass and flying debris.
  • Upgrade your roof and windows. Make sure to upgrade your roof and windows to impact-resistant versions, which can reduce the likelihood of damage.
  • Have an emergency plan. Think through and stock up on any essential items you’d need if the power went out, like food, water, necessary medications and flashlights.

It’s also essential to plan for the aftermath of hail damage. Financial preparedness can also go a long way to ensure you won’t have to spend too much on repairs. This means securing the best homeowners insurance or best renters insurance policy for your needs to help pay for any property damage caused by natural disasters, including hail.

If you own a car, having affordable full coverage car insurance is essential to insure yourself against any damages caused by a hailstorm.

Expert Insights on How Climate Change Impacts Hail Storms

To help you gain more insight into how the strength of hail storms relates to climate change and how they can damage your home, MoneyGeek asked experts for their insights.

  1. Have hail storms become more catastrophic in recent years?
  2. Is climate change impacting the frequency and severity of hail storms in the U.S. and the world?
  3. In what ways can homeowners protect their homes and assets from hail storms?
Kyle Shirley
Kyle Shirley

Owner of Sol Visa Roofing

Dr. Josh Eachus
Dr. Josh Eachus

Chief Meteorologist at YourCast

Full Data Set

MoneyGeek’s full data set provides a detailed look at the economic impacts of hail damage by state. The state-level analysis considers the average annualized expected losses due to building damage and population exposure.

The table below uses the following terminology:

  • Building & Population Losses per Capita: Total expected annualized building and population losses per person based on population size.
  • Building & Population Losses: The expected annualized losses associated with building destruction and damages, injury and loss of life using a FEMA-determined statistical value of life of $7.6 million.
  • Annual Average Number of Hail Events (2018–2021): Average number of hail events per year using hail events occurring from 2018 to 2021.
Rank
State
Building & Population Losses per Capita
Building & Population Losses
Average Annual Number of Hail Events (2018–2021)

1

Colorado

$30.13

$151,540,124

234

2

Nebraska

$27.81

$50,789,184

319

3

Oklahoma

$21.46

$80,487,423

236

4

South Dakota

$15.57

$12,673,567

302

5

North Dakota

$13.69

$9,211,039

204

6

Texas

$13.46

$338,434,396

667

7

Kansas

$11.49

$32,790,393

419

8

Iowa

$9.10

$27,729,526

129

9

Missouri

$8.29

$49,657,261

182

10

Minnesota

$6.19

$32,843,959

196

11

Wisconsin

$5.56

$31,639,100

85

12

Arkansas

$4.76

$13,878,481

96

13

Wyoming

$4.71

$2,654,879

124

14

Mississippi

$4.53

$13,437,972

75

15

Georgia

$4.20

$40,719,967

62

16

Ohio

$3.45

$39,794,375

68

17

Illinois

$3.10

$39,812,637

105

18

Kentucky

$2.44

$10,573,351

44

19

Indiana

$2.41

$15,654,462

58

20

North Carolina

$1.61

$15,354,426

71

21

Montana

$1.45

$1,438,561

150

22

Michigan

$1.32

$13,002,424

47

23

Tennessee

$1.25

$7,945,359

65

24

West Virginia

$1.24

$2,294,033

33

25

New Mexico

$1.18

$2,420,631

75

26

Louisiana

$1.13

$5,102,030

61

27

South Carolina

$0.99

$4,568,784

41

28

Virginia

$0.74

$5,922,522

58

29

Arizona

$0.69

$4,394,553

29

30

Alabama

$0.61

$2,919,997

64

31

Idaho

$0.52

$809,852

18

32

District of Columbia

$0.24

$145,517

1

33

Vermont

$0.23

$143,245

2

34

New Hampshire

$0.21

$279,185

17

35

Pennsylvania

$0.18

$2,291,653

74

36

Maine

$0.16

$212,934

13

37

Nevada

$0.15

$409,361

3

38

Utah

$0.15

$415,118

9

39

Oregon

$0.14

$527,915

12

40

Alaska

$0.12

$85,998

0

41

Delaware

$0.12

$107,563

4

42

New York

$0.09

$1,751,604

37

43

New Jersey

$0.07

$647,224

18

44

Hawaii

$0.07

$89,143

0

45

Florida

$0.05

$866,520

39

46

Massachusetts

$0.05

$297,667

12

47

Washington

$0.04

$277,048

5

48

Maryland

$0.04

$226,044

21

49

California

$0.02

$910,303

8

50

Rhode Island

$0.02

$23,387

2

51

Connecticut

$0.02

$70,405

7

Methodology

MoneyGeek analyzed FEMA’s National Risk Index datasets to calculate the expected annual hail-related financial losses for each city from building damage and population exposure data, which considers the FEMA-determined statistical value of life to be $7.6 million.

To calculate per capita risk, MoneyGeek utilized state populations as of 2016. We calculated the average number of annual hail events using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) data from 2018 to 2021.

The National Risk Index data also includes estimates for agricultural losses due to hail, which were excluded from MoneyGeek’s analysis.

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