Chase Sapphire Preferred Card
vs. Chase Sapphire Reserve Card

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Updated: June 13, 2024

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At first glance, there aren’t many differences between the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card and the Chase Sapphire Reserve Card. Both offer significant sign-up bonus points and neither charges foreign transaction fees, making them ideal for international use.

Although both are useful for frequent travelers, the card that fits you depends on your travel goals and spending habits. Considering that you can’t hold the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card and the Chase Sapphire Reserve Card simultaneously, knowing which one suits you best is crucial. MoneyGeek provides a comparison across various areas to help you decide.

Comparison Overview: Chase Sapphire Preferred Card vs. Chase Sapphire Reserve Card

  • Chase Sapphire Preferred Card
    Chase Sapphire Reserve Card
  • Has Annual Fee
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    checkSign icon
  • Has Balance Transfer Offer
  • Has APR Offer
  • Cash Back Rewards
  • Travel Rewards
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Chase Sapphire Preferred Card At a Glance

The benefits of having a Chase Sapphire Preferred Card come early. You can earn 60,000 bonus points if you can spend $4,000 on purchases within three months from when you first opened your account. It gives you over $750 for travel if you redeem it through Chase Travel℠.

You also earn points when you use your card in other ways. Earn 5X points on Chase Travel℠ (excluding hotel purchases that qualify for the $50 Anniversary Hotel Credit), 3X points at restaurants, select streaming service,es and online grocery purchases (excluding Target, Walmart and wholesale clubs), 2X points on all other travel purchases and 1X points on general purchases.

One of the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card’s most attractive features is its modest $95 annual fee.


  • Chase Sapphire Preferred Card

    A very good rewards card with no foreign transaction fees and comprehensive travel cover


    • 1–5 Points per $1Rewards Rate
    • 21.49%–28.49% VariableAPR
    • $95Annual Fee
    • 670–850 (Good to Excellent)Recommended Credit

    Pros

    • Generous new cardholder bonus
    • High rewards on travel and dining
    • No foreign transaction fees
    • With travel insurance and benefits
    • Flexible rewards redemption options

    Cons

    • With annual fee applies
    • High credit requirement
    • Rewards program can be complex
    • Potentially high APR
    • You can earn 60,000 bonus points after spending $4,000 on purchases within the first three months from account opening. This amounts to $750 when redeemed through Chase Travel℠.
    • Enjoy benefits such as earning 5x points on travel purchased through Chase Travel℠, 3x points on dining, select streaming services, and online groceries, 2x points on all other travel purchases, and 1x points on all other purchases. Additionally, receive a $50 annual Chase Travel Hotel Credit and more.
    • Get 25% more value when you redeem points for airfare, hotels, car rentals, and cruises through Chase Travel℠. For example, 60,000 points are worth $750 toward travel.
    • Count on valuable protections such as Trip Cancellation/Interruption Insurance, Auto Rental Collision Damage Waiver, Lost Luggage Insurance, and more.
    • Enjoy complimentary access to DashPass, which provides $0 delivery fees and reduced service fees for a minimum of one year when activated by December 31, 2024.
    • The card's issuer is an FDIC member.


    Moneygeek.com credit ranges are a variation of FICO® Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.

    Chase Sapphire Preferred Card

Chase Sapphire Reserve Card At a Glance

The Chase Sapphire Reserve Card shares several similarities with the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card, like offering a welcome bonus and allowing you to earn points from your purchases. However, you’ll notice the difference when you delve into the details.

You’ll earn 60,000 sign-up bonus points if you’re able to spend $4,000 within three months from your account opening. You can also earn points from using your card on your purchases. Chase Sapphire Reserve Card, however, works best if you travel a lot — you’ll get as much as 10X points if you use it for hotels or car rentals. If you use it to purchase travel through Chase Travel℠, you earn 5X points.

The Chase Sapphire Reserve Card charges a higher annual fee of $550, but you automatically get $300 worth of credit travel each year. It makes your annual payment more manageable, and you’ll be eligible for other benefits such as airport lounge access when you travel.


  • Chase Sapphire Reserve Card

    Best for premium travel with flexible redemption points


    • 1–10 Points per $1Rewards Rate
    • 22.49% - 29.49% VariableAPR
    • $550Annual Fee
    • ExcellentRecommended Credit

    Pros

    • Exceptional point rewards for dining and travel through Chase Travel℠
    • Boosted redemption value for travel
    • Substantial signup bonus
    • Exclusive luxury perks for travelers
    • Travel and purchase protection
    • Annual travel credit

    Cons

    • High annual fee
    • No introductory APR period
    • High variable APR
    • Earn 60,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $900 toward travel when you redeem through Chase Travel℠.
    • $300 Annual Travel Credit as reimbursement for travel purchases charged to your card each account anniversary year.
    • Earn 5x total points on flights and 10x total points on hotels and car rentals when you purchase travel through Chase Travel℠ immediately after the first $300 is spent on travel purchases annually. Earn 3x points on other travel and dining & 1 point per $1 spent on all other purchases
    • Get 50% more value when you redeem your points for travel through Chase Travel℠. For example, 60,000 points are worth $900 toward travel.
    • 1:1 point transfer to leading airline and hotel loyalty programs
    • Access to 1,300+ airport lounges worldwide after an easy, one-time enrollment in Priority Pass™ Select and up to $100 application fee credit every four years for Global Entry, NEXUS, or TSA PreCheck®
    • Count on Trip Cancellation/Interruption Insurance, Auto Rental Collision Damage Waiver, Lost Luggage Insurance and more.
    • Member FDIC
    Chase Sapphire Reserve Card

Comparison Summary

If you compare the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card and the Chase Sapphire Reserve Card, you’ll notice they differ in several areas although they’re both travel rewards cards. The table below explores these differences and details which card has an advantage for each segment.

Card Detail
Comparison Summary

Trip Cancellation Benefits

If you’re unable to push through with your trip due to an uncontrollable event, both cards provide trip cancellation benefits, which may help cover your losses.

Chase Sapphire Preferred Card provides the primary cardholder up to $5,000 coverage per trip or $10,000 per 12-month period. If protection extends to several people while traveling, these amounts increase to $10,000 per trip or $20,000 per 12-month period.

Chase Sapphire Reserve Card offers similar benefits but with higher limits. It pays up to a maximum of $20,000 per occurrence. If you cover several people, you get up to $10,000 per person for each trip. All in all, it results in a maximum of $40,000 in 12 months.

Winner: Chase Sapphire Reserve Card

Authorized Users

You can add authorized users for both cards. While the Chase Sapphire Reserve Card requires you to pay $75 annually for each person, the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card allows you to do this for free.

Winner: Chase Sapphire Preferred Card

Welcome Bonus

Both cards offer a welcome bonus offer of 60,000 points if you spend $4,000 in first 3 months.

Winner: Tie

Rewards

Worldwide dining and travel are bonus categories for both cards, which means you’ll earn points each time you make purchases under these categories.

However, the Chase Sapphire Reserve Card gives you 5X points on air travel and 10X points on hotels and car rentals. You’ll be able to get these if you make your purchases through Chase Travel℠.

If you make similar purchases using the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card, the most you’ll get is 5X points for travel purchased through Chase Travel℠. All other travel purchases, such as hotels, car rentals and plane tickets, only get you 2X points.

Winner: Chase Sapphire Reserve Card

Annual Fee

One of the most significant differences between the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card and the Chase Sapphire Reserve Card is their annual fee.

The Chase Sapphire Preferred Card has an annual fee of $95 — standard for most travel reward cards. In comparison, you need to pay $550 per year for the Chase Sapphire Reserve Card. It only becomes more cost-effective if you can maximize all its benefits.

Winner: Chase Sapphire Preferred Card

Which Card Should You Get?

The best way to determine which card you should get — the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card or the Chase Sapphire Reserve Card — is to consider your spending patterns, budget and travel goals. Depending on how you intend to use it, one card may be better suited for you than the other.

Who Should Consider the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card?

There are several reasons why you should get a Chase Sapphire Preferred Card. Its reward program is better suited for some situations. If any of these scenarios are similar to yours, the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card may be a good option for you. Consider this card if:

    worldTraveler icon

    You’re looking for a travel rewards card with a lower annual fee

    The Chase Sapphire Preferred Card only charges $95 per year. It’s much cheaper in comparison to the Sapphire Reserve’s $550 annual fee, so it’s a solid option if you won’t be able to maximize the Reserve’s benefits.

    twoPointsPerDollar icon

    High-end travel perks aren’t dealbreakers for you

    You get five points for every dollar you spend on travel purchased through Chase Travel℠. If you don’t go through that portal, you get 2X points. If you’re comfortable traveling without having access to airport lounges, it’s a great way to earn points.

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    You use your card for a variety of purchases

    Although it’s primarily a travel rewards card, the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card also allows you to earn points when you use it for other items. You get 3X points for each dollar you spend on dining (including eligible takeout and delivery services) and select streaming platforms. Unless you buy from Target, Walmart and other wholesale clubs, you can get 3X points for buying groceries online.

Who Should Consider the Chase Sapphire Reserve Card?

If you take advantage of its higher bonus categories, the Chase Sapphire Reserve Card may be a good option for you. Although it has a higher annual fee, it may turn out to be more cost-effective if you fit any of the following:

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    You’re a frequent traveler

    Using your card to purchase hotels, airfare and car rental services allows you to earn 5X to 10X points. You also get an annual travel credit of $300, which you can use for various purchases, such as plane tickets or Uber rides.

    businessOwner icon

    You prefer to travel in style

    Being a Chase Sapphire Reserve Cardholder comes with access to Priority Pass Select. It allows you to enjoy airport lounges worldwide. It means you can relax and enjoy snacks and drinks for free while waiting for your flight. You can also get up to $100 reimbursed every four years to apply for either Global Entry or TSA PreCheck, giving you expedited security clearance.

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    You often use rideshare services

    All cardholders get an automatic 1-year Lyft Pink membership. It shaves 15% off your rides, such as when you schedule a priority pick-up from the airport. You also get 10X points from Lyft rides.

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EXPERT OPINION

I believe the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card is the best bang for your buck travel credit card on the market. If you travel frequently enough to justify a $550 annual fee, I believe there are better premium travel credit cards out there than the Reserve like the Capital One Venture X Rewards Credit Card or The Platinum Card® from American Express. But if you travel regularly and want to score a valuable sign-up bonus, the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card is an easy choice.

Other Helpful Decision-Making FAQs

Choosing the right credit card is a crucial decision. It’s particularly true for the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card and the Chase Sapphire Reserve Card since you cannot carry both cards simultaneously. Here are the commonly asked questions about these cards to help you make your choice.

Is Chase Sapphire Preferred Card better than Chase Sapphire Reserve Card?
Can you get Chase Sapphire Preferred Card if you have Chase Sapphire Reserve Card?
Can you transfer points from Chase Sapphire Preferred Card to Chase Sapphire Reserve Card?
Can you switch from Chase Sapphire Preferred Card to Chase Sapphire Reserve Card?
What’s harder to get, Chase Sapphire Preferred Card or Chase Sapphire Reserve Card?
How much do you have to spend for Chase Sapphire Preferred Card vs Chase Sapphire Reserve Card to get the welcome bonus?

Still Not Sure About These Cards? Consider These Options

If you’re still not sold on either the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card or the Chase Sapphire Reserve Card, there are other travel cards that you may want to explore further. You can check out the Capital One VentureOne Rewards Credit Card or the Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card. Both of these are part of MoneyGeek’s list of best travel cards.

About Doug Milnes, CFA


Doug Milnes, CFA headshot

Doug Milnes is a CFA charter holder with over 10 years of experience in corporate finance and the Head of Credit Cards at MoneyGeek. Formerly, he performed valuations for Duff and Phelps and financial planning and analysis for various companies. His analysis has been cited by U.S. News and World Report, The Hill, the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times and many other outlets.

Milnes holds a master’s degree in data science from Northwestern University. He geeks out on helping people feel on top of their credit card use, from managing debt to optimizing rewards.


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*Rates, fees or bonuses may vary or include specific stipulations. The content on this page is accurate as of the posting/last updated date; however, some of the offers mentioned may have expired. We recommend visiting the card issuer’s website for the most up-to-date information available.
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