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    Adem Selita
  • Meg Nordmann
    Meg Nordmann
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    Ben Reynolds
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    Emily Deaton
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    Adem Selita
  • Meg Nordmann
    Meg Nordmann
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    Ben Reynolds
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    Emily Deaton
  • Adem Selita
    Adem Selita
  • Meg Nordmann
    Meg Nordmann
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    Ben Reynolds

With Santa's sleigh grounded this year due to COVID-19, holiday spending is on everyone’s minds. In a year that has been unpredictable, especially when it comes to the economy and job security, what does it look like to budget well and spend wisely on gifts? Find actionable tips, spending insights and ideas for approaching the holidays in the guide that follows.

COVID-19 and the Digital Spending World

Holiday gifts traditionally account for 20% of annual retail sales, but economists predict the numbers could be askew for 2020. In an interview with the Wall Street Journal, retail industry analyst Sucharita Kodali predicted 2020 holiday spending would likely flatline when compared to 2019. Though she predicts online sales will soar by 20–25%, the lack of in-person shopping will be significant.

Recognizing these trends, retailers with online storefronts are working overtime to transition Black Friday to the digital space. Aside from Amazon's beloved Prime Day, Wal-Mart and Target have already introduced large-scale Black Friday events in hopes of appealing to online shoppers. While this transition may make holiday shopping less stressful than in years past, you may find yourself competing with far more shoppers to get the best deals.

4 Common Holiday Expenses and Ways to Save

Common Expenses and Ways to Save

Each year, Deloitte puts together a holiday retail survey designed to capture how households plan to spend their money and handle budgeting for holiday spending. The 2020 report highlights average spending for various common expenses and offers insight into where you could be saving.

1. Gifts

Average Cost: $487

Gifts can include purchases for both family and friends, though the final dollar amount depends on how many gifts you plan to purchase. Some people also purchase gifts for coworkers and other work professionals. A T. Rowe Price survey found parents spent an average of $422 per child in 2018.

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TIPS TO SAVE
  • Set a firm budget before you start shopping.
  • Create a set list of individuals you plan to buy gifts.
  • Decide how many presents to buy for each person on your list.

2. Travel

Average Cost: $260

Many spend their holidays traveling to see family while others enjoy time away from their home. Deloitte notes this number is down by 34% year-over-year due to the pandemic, but some individuals may still choose to fly or drive to see their families over the holidays.

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TIPS TO SAVE
  • Search nearby airports when looking for cheap flights to save on your holiday travel.
  • Book flights and car rentals far in advance.
  • Find a credit card offering ample travel points.
  • Consider flying on the actual holiday for cheaper tickets.

3. Entertaining at Home

Average Cost: $205

Whether hosting dinners, cookie decorating parties or holiday meals with the family, entertaining others at home can quickly add up with food and beverages, miscellaneous gifts and little extras to add sparkle to your festivities.

This year may be slightly different because of COVID-19. You can still have lovely holiday meals and cookie decorating fun with family members currently in your household and video chat with extended family members.

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TIPS TO SAVE
  • Shop the sales at your local grocery stores, especially when it comes to bigger ticket items such as meat or flowers.
  • Consider styling the party as a potluck and ask others to bring sides, beverages and other dishes to complement the entree.

4. Non-Gift Purchases

Average Cost: $435

Expenses falling into this category can include holiday decorations, greeting cards, flowers, movie tickets and other costs that you commonly incur while celebrating with others.

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TIPS TO SAVE
  • Buy items such as decorations, greeting cards, wrapping paper and other seasonal items once they go on sale or clearance after the holiday ends. You can use these items next year rather than paying full price.
  • Consider an artificial tree that you can reuse each year.

How to Approach Budgeting for the Holidays

How to Approach Budgeting for the Holidays

It's no secret that overspending during the holidays is tempting, especially if you enjoy seeing the glee of someone receiving a thoughtful present. Whether you tend to go overboard on gifts or holiday baked goods, there are ways to find a balance between keeping your budget and enjoying the holiday season.

By creating a budget early on, you can track your spending and ensure you don't break the bank. Below you can find some tips and ideas for keeping both your tree and your bank account in the green.

Spends by Common Gift Receivers

Deloitte reported the average household would spend $487 on gifts during the 2020 holiday season. This number may be higher or lower for you depending on the number of family members and friends whom you plan to give presents.

A Budget Plan That Gives Back

Creating a budget before the holiday season starts can provide multiple benefits. In addition to ensuring you are debt-free, it can also help you set firm boundaries on spending and save money by avoiding frivolous purchases.

Here are ways to get started.

1

Make a list, complete with amounts

Create an Excel spreadsheet with the name of every person you plan to buy a gift. Decide your total amount for gifts and divide this number across each name. As you purchase gifts, add the actual spending amount to the spreadsheet to track your budget.

2

Create a gift fund

If paying for gifts from your monthly income in November or December will put you in the red, save a certain amount of money each month leading up to the holidays for the next year. For instance, you may want to save $10 per week that goes towards gifts.

3

Be flexible

Rather than feeling each person on your list must have one specific gift, regardless of cost, come up with a few different options. Set alerts for each to see which ones go on sale prior to the holidays.

Costs of Hosting a Party

Americans plan to spend an average of $205 on entertaining at home during the 2020 holiday season. It's hard to know exactly how COVID-19 will affect this number. Some individuals may be planning more at-home gatherings to avoid restaurants, while others may slash this budget entirely to limit gatherings.

A Budget Plan That Gives Back

Creating an entertaining budget can help you be aware of expenses such as food, beverages, party favors, games and decorations. By identifying these early on, you ensure they don't sneak up on you during the holiday season.

Here are three tips to help you spend wisely.

1

Identify budget and categories

Make a spreadsheet with every possible expense and put an amount next to each item that adds up to your total budget. Track your spending in each item as you go along and adjust the categories as necessary, ensuring you stay within your set budget.

2

Reconsider your menu

If you want to serve filet mignon, but your budget doesn't allow it, get creative. Retailers such as Costco sometimes offer deals on larger amounts of meat, or you can go with a different cut.

3

Recycle decorations

You can cut your decoration budget almost entirely by reusing materials from years prior. If you want a little refresh, consider adding small amounts of real greenery or flowers.

Traveling (if You Plan to Make the Trip)

Households plan to spend an average of $260 on travel during the 2020 holidays, a number that can vary substantially for families based on how they're handling COVID-19. Some individuals may decide to stay put this year while others may feel confident driving or flying.

A Budget Plan That Gives Back

Budgeting for travel can be tricky when you're at the mercy of changing airline ticket prices, but there are plenty of options for you to rein in spending and save on holiday travel.

Try these three tips for your travel plans.

1

Be flexible

If possible, look at flights a few days before and after your ideal dates to see if you can find a discount. If other airports are an hour or so away from you or your destination, check to see if it's cheaper to fly in or out of those airports.

2

Get travel insurance

It may seem counterintuitive, but travel insurance — especially on flights — can help ensure you don't lose money if your flight gets canceled or you cannot travel. Travel insurance can be particularly helpful during COVID-19.

3

Ask for travel gifts

If you want to get home, but your budget is already stretched, consider asking for travel vouchers instead of physical gifts this year. Your loved ones may decide to go in together on helping you get back for the holidays.

Download a Budget Worksheet to Help You Plan

financialPlanning

If you prefer hands-on money management, budget worksheets can help make sure you don't overspend and track your purchases. We provide a downloadable Excel worksheet to help get you started, but you can also create custom financial planners to fit your needs.

Download MoneyGeek's Excel Budget Worksheet

Steps to Take After You've Made it Through the Holidays

Ultimate Holiday Budget Plan

Whether you stayed on budget or went over during the holidays, it's worthwhile to review your expenses, make adjustments to your budget plan and get a head start on your spending for next year.

Check out some of our tips below on taking a proactive step early in the new year.

1

Assess what worked (and what didn't)

Even though it's now in the past, take time to review your spending over the holidays. This step can help you assess what worked and didn't work, and make changes for the next holiday season. Be sure to look at each spending category and make notes.

2

Take advantage of clearance sales

If you enjoy refreshing your decorations, wrapping paper and holiday cards each year, go ahead and purchase next year's items when this year's decorations go on sale. Retailers such as Target, Wal-Mart and others eventually mark items down to 75–90% off the retail price.

3

Create a holiday savings account

Many banks allow you to open free savings accounts and automatically transfer a set amount of money after each paycheck. Set this up early so you can enjoy the rewards without thinking about it all year.

4

Buy presents throughout the year

You can often get better deals on presents when you don't feel a time crunch to purchase them. Determine the gifts you want to give, create alerts for each item online and buy them when you get a notice about them being on sale.

5

Set travel notifications

If you already know where you will spend the holidays next year, set alerts based on your available dates and location. If the price of a flight, rental car or other travel essential drops to a price within your set budget, go ahead and book it.

Expert Insight on Holiday Spending

We spoke with several industry leaders to provide expert insight on keeping your holiday budget on track this year. Check out the tips and insight they provide.

  1. What questions should consumers ask themselves before creating a holiday budget?

    First and foremost, if your income recently changed due to COVID, make sure you set up a budget beforehand! No one is going to judge you this year if you don’t overspend. The economy is currently in a recession, and consumers need to be somewhat frugal this year. Consumers should ask themselves what they can designate this year on holiday spending and avoid racking up credit card debt at all costs.

    Tip: Watch small purchases! They all add up. Don’t think big-ticket items are the only kind of emotional spending that breaks the bank. Spending $50 on Amazon each week might not seem so bad, but by the end of the year, this will actually end up costing you $2,600.

    You should have a budget in mind on what you would like to spend on each person for a gift, and then see what you have left. If you do not have enough left, keep swapping until you are happy with all numbers.

    Holiday gift purchases should never put you further into debt. No loved one would ever want you to dig yourself into a financial trench with interest compounding on top of you just to participate in a gift exchange. If finances are tight this year, set up expectations with your loved ones as early as you can so you don't feel the pressure to make purchases outside your realistic budget. Chances are, your loved ones will feel relieved to have those expectations lifted off of them as well.

    People should evaluate their finances to see if they have enough money this year to spend on gifts for everyone who used to be on their list. If they do, they can still save money by only spending a certain amount for each person or limiting the number of gifts. However, those who don't might consider notifying family members they can't afford to get everyone a gift this year, especially with some families deciding to do virtual holidays due to COVID-19.

  2. How can buyers balance the emotional with the practical when it comes to buying meaningful gifts?

    When looking to control emotional spending, the absolute first step that you should take is to create a clear budget for yourself. Allow yourself to still spend on unplanned purchases, but know that there needs to be a hard limit.

    A good way to stick to this is by creating a separate savings account for yourself and labeling it. This account will be used for purchases from your Amazon Wishlist, so once Cyber Monday hits, you already have your Wishlist in order and organized. In addition, make use of the tracking features your bank app likely offers.

    If you don’t have this option, download a money management app and use it to track your spending. This will help you see the impact all purchases make on your finances, as well as allow you to stick to a budget.

    The holidays are not just about gifts. People want to spend time with family, and that is something that you cannot put a price on. You have to just enjoy those moments, and money not being spent is usually for the best when it becomes emotional.

    Too often, we fall into this trap of believing that gift-giving is a "love language." The problem is that gift-giving is a transactional act in our culture, as we have set up expectations of reciprocation. Love should not be transactional. It should be transcendent. So my first tip is to shed the idea that you must express your love by giving material items. Instead, express your love and appreciation for someone by some other, more meaningful "love language," such as words of kindness or an act of service. This could be as simple as a genuine hand-written card with an experience gift, like a promise to give a back rub or a visit to the movie theater or art museum together. Consumables are another way to give an experience and can still be thoughtful. Consider giving artisan chocolate, a craft cocktail mix or a locally roasted coffee. If a consumable is of fine quality, hand-crafted or made locally, it will have that meaningful story behind it to make it a special gift without breaking the bank.

    Figuring out how much you’re going to spend for each person is a start. Then you can decide what meaningful gift each person would love that’s right on budget for you. Expensive doesn’t always equate meaningful, so people can still pick gifts that aren’t too expensive that someone would love and consider special.

  3. If getting gifts for everyone on the holiday list is going to put someone in a monetary bind, what alternatives do they have during this season of gifting?

    Plan ahead for the items you know you will be getting — whether this is a PlayStation 5 or any other big-ticket items. You should install the Honey extension on your browser to get the best coupons around the web whenever (you are) doing any online shopping and use SlickDeals, Amazon Price Checker App and CamelCamelCamel to set up price trackers for items you know you will buy.

    Honey will definitely maximize your rewards from online shopping and the others will assist in helping you get the best price around the web. You should always try to maximize credit rewards based on your spending categories, but make sure not to overspend and rack up credit card debt. There is a lot of uncertainty in today’s economic climate and the last thing you want is to head into 2021 with an outsized amount of credit card debt.

    Moreover, it may not be a bad idea to use a credit card that offers price protection. The Synchrony Rakuten Cash back card and Wells Fargo Visa Signature are the two best ones that come to mind. If you do overpay for any items, you have 60 days to get the price difference reimbursed.

    Making gifts can be a great way to save money. People like having something homemade, and it can be more meaningful to them than something you can buy. So do-it-yourself (DIY) gifts can be a great alternative.

    Try creating events that will gather everyone together without adding expenses. For example, do a "cookie swap" party where everyone brings two dozen cookies, and then everyone goes home with a handful of each type of cookie. This allows everyone to be creative, gift something handmade and fulfills that urge to participate in an exchange, but only costs the amount of flour and sugar. Similarly, have a cookie decorating party or a gingerbread house party where everyone gathers and gets creative with icing or sprinkles. You could also host a "homemade ornament swap." Make it clear in the invitation that this is a "No Gift Exchange" party and just the cookies or ornaments are to take center stage.

    This year, families in financial binds can utilize the iconic secret Santa, which can be entertaining for the whole family to enjoy. People can also decide to do homemade gifts only to cut down on holiday spending expenses.


Adem Selita
Adem SelitaCEO & Co-founder of The Debt Relief Company
Emily Deaton
Emily DeatonFinancial Journalist at Let Me Bank
Meg Nordmann
Meg NordmannAuthor of 'Have Yourself a Minimalist Christmas'
Ben Reynolds
Ben ReynoldsCEO and Founder of Sure Dividend

Additional Resources for Holiday Spending

If you're still looking for additional information or tips on holiday spending, check out some top-tier resources on the subject.

About the Author


expert-profile

Based in Nashville, Tennessee, Katy McWhirter specializes in researching and writing about education, health, travel and history. She holds a bachelor's degree in social entrepreneurship from Belmont University and a master's degree in history from the University of York. Prior to transitioning into her current role as a writer, McWhirter worked with numerous educational institutions and nonprofit organizations. More of her work can be found at www.thenative.me.


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