COVID-19 Employment Study:

US Cities Most Impacted by Leisure and Hospitality Job Loss and Recovery

ByDanielle Kiser

Updated: April 7, 2023

ByDanielle Kiser

Updated: April 7, 2023

Advertising & Editorial Disclosure

COVID-19 has impacted every sector of the economy, but the leisure and hospitality (L&H) industry has been hit particularly hard. This sector encompasses arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodations and food service — all industries significantly disrupted by COVID restrictions. Despite data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) pointing to an overall resurgence in leisure and hospitality, many cities are still struggling to recover these jobs.

MoneyGeek analyzed recent data to determine the cities impacted most by leisure and hospitality job losses, as well as the cities that have recovered the most jobs.

Key Findings:
  • Between February 2020 and April 2020, almost half of the sector’s jobs disappeared, according to the BLS.
  • 2.1 million leisure and hospitality jobs are still missing compared to February 2020’s jobs levels of 16.9 million.
  • Despite still missing millions of jobs, the leisure and hospitality industry has gained back 75% of its jobs since its April 2020 low of 8.6 million.
  • Recovery isn't uniform. For instance, while Atlantic City, NJ recovered 94% of lost leisure and hospitality jobs as of June 2021, Orlando, FL was still missing 30% of its hospitality positions.

Cities That Have Recovered the Most Leisure and Hospitality Jobs

As cities and states reopen their economies, many leisure and hospitality jobs have returned. To assess the cities that have recovered the most leisure and hospitality jobs, MoneyGeek’s data team analyzed 338 metropolitan statistical areas and calculated the change in hospitality job numbers from February 2020 to June 2021. Comparing from February 2020 allowed us to examine each city’s pre-COVID job numbers. We then normalized the recovered jobs based on the city population and the size of the leisure and hospitality sector by calculating the recovered jobs as a percent of the total employment.

In other words, MoneyGeek identified the cities where recovered leisure and hospitality jobs had the largest impact.

For example, by June 2021, Atlantic City, NJ had recovered 27,800 leisure and hospitality jobs, or 94% of the jobs lost. These 27,800 jobs represented a return of 24% of the total jobs in the area, which indicates the magnitude of these recovered jobs relative to the entire Atlantic City job market.

25 Top Cities That Have Recovered Leisure and Hospitality Jobs
Rank
Metropolitan Area
Recovery Impact (% of total jobs)
L&H Jobs Recovered (to Jun '21)
% L&H Jobs Recovered

1

Atlantic City, NJ

24.1%

27,800

93.9%

2

Myrtle Beach, SC

12.5%

23,500

126.3%

3

Gulfport, MS

8.0%

12,600

95.5%

4

Buffalo, NY

6.3%

32,400

98.5%

5

Asheville, NC

6.2%

14,200

85.0%

6

Savannah, GA

6.1%

11,600

95.1%

7

Charleston, SC

5.6%

21,600

87.8%

8

Providence, RI

5.6%

37,200

95.6%

9

Des Moines, IA

5.5%

19,700

112.6%

10

Harrisburg, PA

5.4%

15,600

100.0%

11

Cincinnati, OH

4.8%

52,900

90.0%

12

Bridgeport, CT

4.8%

21,300

94.7%

13

Albany, NY

4.6%

19,600

92.0%

14

Omaha, NE

4.5%

21,900

104.3%

15

Louisville/Jefferson County, KY

4.5%

29,400

92.7%

16

Rochester, NY

4.5%

22,200

91.0%

17

Colorado Springs, CO

4.4%

15,300

90.5%

18

Allentown, PA

4.4%

18,700

93.5%

19

Kansas City, MO

4.3%

48,100

98.6%

20

Virginia Beach, VA

4.2%

35,800

90.6%

21

Wichita, KS

4.2%

13,100

97.8%

22

Grand Rapids, MI

4.1%

23,700

86.5%

23

Corpus Christi, TX

4.1%

8,100

97.6%

24

Hartford, CT

4.1%

24,800

89.5%

25

Akron, OH

4.1%

14,100

86.5%

Top Cities Where Hospitality Job Losses Hurt the Most

As COVID-19 shut down events and travel, jobs in cities highly reliant on the tourism economy dropped off significantly. MoneyGeek compiled the number of leisure and hospitality jobs lost for each of the 338 metropolitan statistical areas since February 2020. To select the top cities, we calculated the lost jobs as a percent of the total employment in the city to assess where hospitality job losses hurt the most.

For example, as of June 2021, Kahului, Hawaii (the Metropolitan Statistical Area covering Maui, Lanai, and Molokai) had lost 33% of its leisure and hospitality jobs, which translates to a 9.8% decrease in total employment.

25 Cities Hardest Hit by Leisure and Hospitality Job Losses
Rank
Metro Area
Jun '21 Lost Jobs: % Total Jobs
Jun '21 Lost Jobs v. Feb '20
Feb '20 L&H Jobs
Lost Jobs: % of Feb L&H

1

Kahului, HI

-9.8%

-8,400

25,800

-33%

2

Orlando, FL

-6.3%

-84,400

280,600

-30%

3

Las Vegas, NV

-6.0%

-68,400

292,300

-23%

4

New Orleans, LA

-4.5%

-26,700

92,800

-29%

5

Naples, FL

-4.0%

-7,300

33,000

-22%

6

Urban Honolulu, HI

-3.6%

-16,100

75,900

-21%

7

San Francisco Bay , CA

-3.4%

-85,000

281,900

-30%

8

Cape Coral, FL

-3.2%

-11,300

47,400

-24%

9

Salinas, CA

-3.2%

-6,100

26,200

-23%

10

San Jose/Sunnyvale/Santa Clara, CA

-3.1%

-32,800

105,300

-31%

11

San Diego, CA

-2.7%

-41,800

197,800

-21%

12

Santa Maria, CA

-2.6%

-5,500

28,400

-19%

13

Sacramento, CA

-2.5%

-26,700

110,800

-24%

14

North Port, FL

-2.3%

-8,500

49,100

-17%

15

Los Angeles Metro, CA

-2.2%

-144,200

773,400

-19%

16

Portland, OR

-2.0%

-26,200

123,500

-21%

17

New York Metro (NY/NJ)

-2.0%

-195,700

905,000

-22%

18

Miami, FL

-2.0%

-61,300

344,900

-18%

19

Washington, DC Metro

-1.9%

-65,400

326,400

-20%

20

Durham, NC

-1.9%

-5,700

28,600

-20%

21

Lexington, KY

-1.8%

-4,700

31,300

-15%

22

Seattle, WA

-1.7%

-36,900

202,400

-18%

23

Reno, NV

-1.7%

-4,300

38,100

-11%

24

Chicago, IL

-1.6%

-75,600

475,100

-16%

25

Riverside, CA

-1.6%

-32,200

179,100

-18%

Cities With the Largest Number of Leisure and Hospitality Jobs Lost

MoneyGeek also reviewed the cities that saw the most significant declines in leisure and hospitality jobs in the United States overall. As of June 2021, these larger metro areas accounted for 1.3 million leisure and hospitality job losses.

25 Cities With the Most Leisure and Hospitality Job Losses
Metropolitan Area
Jun '21 L&H Jobs
Change v. Feb '20
% Change

New York Metro (NY/NJ)

709,300

-195,700

-21.6%

Los Angeles Metro, CA

629,200

-144,200

-18.6%

San Francisco Bay , CA

196,900

-85,000

-30.2%

Orlando, FL

196,200

-84,400

-30.1%

Greater Chicago , IL

399,500

-75,600

-15.9%

Las Vegas, NV

223,900

-68,400

-23.4%

Washington, DC Metro

261,000

-65,400

-20.0%

Miami, FL

283,600

-61,300

-17.8%

San Diego, CA

156,000

-41,800

-21.1%

Atlanta, GA

260,300

-40,400

-13.4%

Boston, MA

229,200

-38,700

-14.4%

Seattle, WA

165,500

-36,900

-18.2%

Greater Philadelphia, PA

231,100

-35,500

-13.3%

San Jose/Sunnyvale/Santa Clara, CA

72,500

-32,800

-31.1%

Riverside, CA

146,900

-32,200

-18.0%

Phoenix, AZ

213,300

-29,000

-12.0%

New Orleans, LA

66,100

-26,700

-28.8%

Sacramento, CA

84,100

-26,700

-24.1%

Portland, OR

97,300

-26,200

-21.2%

Detroit, MI

170,200

-24,100

-12.4%

Minneapolis, MN

162,700

-21,000

-11.4%

Dallas-Fort Worth, TX

375,900

-20,200

-5.1%

Denver, CO

150,300

-17,700

-10.5%

Urban Honolulu, HI

59,800

-16,100

-21.2%

Baltimore, MD

114,600

-15,900

-12.2%

An Industry Quick to Decline But Slowly Recovering

Leisure and hospitality job numbers were cut in half during the first two months of the coronavirus pandemic in the United States. Unfortunately, this sector may also be slow to recover in some places.

Jobs in the leisure and hospitality sector and related industries are vital to the economy of many American cities. Losses in this sector have significantly impacted the overall unemployment rate and have even had a ripple effect on other sectors. Large metropolitan areas with a reliance on tourists, travel and gambling are among the hardest hit by COVID-19.

As the nation looks to signs of economic recovery, the leisure and hospitality industry landscape is changing. Many businesses are exploring new models and ways to help people dine safely or connect them from a distance. From curbside pickup and limited capacity dining to virtual concerts and the return of the drive-in movie experience, business owners and employees are looking for opportunities to provide safe entertainment and maintain jobs.

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MONEYGEEK EXPERT TIP

If you or a loved one has lost a job due to COVID-19, resources are available to help you recover, file for unemployment, retrieve lost wages and find new work opportunities.

Expert Insight on Leisure and Hospitality Job Losses

  1. What advice would you give to laid-off or furloughed leisure and hospitality workers during COVID-19?
  2. What long-term impacts do you think leisure and hospitality job losses will have on state and local economies?
  3. What kind of employment or industry shifts do you foresee as a result of hospitality job losses?
  4. In some states, restaurants, bars and other service-related establishments have reopened and then closed again. What are the long and short-term implications of these shifts for business owners, workers and local economies?
  5. What are some of the impacts the COVID-19 pandemic has had on the hospitality industry?
  6. Which impacts from the pandemic do you anticipate will be long-lasting or permanent?
  7. How have businesses reacted or adjusted to COVID-19? What's different about larger companies versus small businesses?
  8. Given the current environment, what advice would you give to hospitality workers and businesses?
Suzanne Bagnera, Ph.D.
Suzanne Bagnera, Ph.D.Director of the Hospitality Institute at Indian River State College
Andrew Coggins, Jr.
Andrew Coggins, Jr.Clinical Professor at the Lubin School of Business at Pace University
Jack Samuels
Jack SamuelsProfessor - Hospitality and Tourism at Feliciano School of Business
Joseph E. Dworak
Joseph E. DworakFounding and Continuing Adjunct Hospitality Law Faculty, San Jose State University
Ajay Aluri, Ph.D.
Ajay Aluri, Ph.D.Founding Director, WVU HIT Lab & Associate Professor
Jason Y. Zhang
Jason Y. ZhangLecturer at The Collins College
Jeffery Kreeger
Jeffery KreegerPh.D., CHIA, Director of Tourism and Hospitality Studies at Central Connecticut State University
Andrew Moreo
Andrew MoreoAssistant Professor and Director of Research at Florida International University’s (FIU) Chaplin School of Hospitality and Tourism Management (CSHTM)
Kristin Malek
Kristin MalekAssistant Professor and Event Management Extension Specialist at the College of Education and Human Sciences at the University of Nebraska
Claire Stewart
Claire StewartAssociate Professor at New York City College of Technology, City University of New York
Patrick J. Holladay, Ph.D.
Patrick J. Holladay, Ph.D.Associate Professor in the School of Hospitality, Sport and Tourism Management at Troy University
Mark Z. Meng, Ph.D.
Mark Z. Meng, Ph.D.Assistant Professor of Hospitality and Tourism Management at Indiana University Kokomo
Cathy Lanzalaco
Cathy LanzalacoCEO at Inspire Careers
Frederick J. DeMicco, Ph.D.
Frederick J. DeMicco, Ph.D.Executive Director and Professor in the School of Hotel and Restaurant Management at Northern Arizona University
Jeff Lolli, Ed.D., CHE
Jeff Lolli, Ed.D., CHEProfessor of Business Management at Widener University
Angel F. González, Ph.D.
Angel F. González, Ph.D.Assistant Professor of Sustainable Hospitality at California State University Monterey Bay
Joseph Scarcelli, PhD, CHE
Joseph Scarcelli, PhD, CHEAssociate Professor, Hospitality Management at York College of Pennsylvania
James Brian Aday, Ph.D.
James Brian Aday, Ph.D.Assistant Professor, Lam Family College of Business, San Francisco State University
Michael McCall, Ph.D.
Michael McCall, Ph.D.Professor of Hospitality Business at Michigan State University
John W. Lipford, J.D.
John W. Lipford, J.D.Affiliate Professor in Grand Valley State University’s Hospitality and Tourism Management Program
Nizar K. Hussein
Nizar K. HusseinFixed Term Faculty, Hospitality; Internship Director-Hospitality Program at the College of Business Administration at Central Michigan University
Tyra Warner
Tyra WarnerPh.D., JD, Department Chair of Hospitality, Tourism, & Culinary Arts at the College of Coastal Georgia
Rebecca Heid
Rebecca HeidAssociate Professor of Hospitality Management at Northampton Community College
Justin Taillon
Justin TaillonCHIA, CHTP, Program Manager, Hotel & Hospitality Management at Highline College
Thomas Maier
Thomas MaierAssociate Professor, Hospitality Management at the University of San Francisco
A.J. Singh
A.J. SinghFounding Director Hospitality and Tourism Management University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
Robert M. O'Halloran
Robert M. O'HalloranProfessor and Director of the School of Hospitality Leadership at East Carolina University
Manisha Singal, Ph.D.
Manisha Singal, Ph.D.Associate Professor in Hospitality Management in the Pamplin College of Business at Virginia Tech
Pooja S. Nair
Pooja S. NairPartner and Chair of the Food, Beverage and Hospitality Group at Ervin Cohen & Jessup LLP
Dr. Albert Yu
Dr. Albert YuBusiness Administration Faculty at Santa Rosa Junior College
Dr. Cihan Cobanoglu
Dr. Cihan CobanogluMcKibbon Endowed Chair & Director of M3 Center at the University of South Florida
Adrian R. Lizano, BSHRM, MBA
Adrian R. Lizano, BSHRM, MBAProfessor of Hospitality, San Diego Mesa College, College of Business
Shannon M. Rowen
Shannon M. RowenProgram Director & Associate Professor of Practice, Hospitality, Restaurant and Tourism Management, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Mr. Michael "Doc" Terry
Mr. Michael "Doc" TerrySenior Instructor, Rosen College of Hospitality Management at the University of Central Florida
Karen E. Silva, EdD, CHE
Karen E. Silva, EdD, CHEDepartment Chairperson of Graduate Business Programs at Johnson & Wales University, College of Business
Alan Yen, Ph.D., CHIA
Alan Yen, Ph.D., CHIAAssociate Professor, Hospitality and Food Management at Ball State University
Dipra Jha
Dipra JhaAssistant Director & Scholarly Associate Professor, School of Hospitality Business Management, Washington State University, Carson College of Business
Dr. Sotiris Hji-Avgoustis
Dr. Sotiris Hji-AvgoustisProfessor of Hospitality and Food Management at Ball State University
Ignatius Cahyanto, Ph.D.
Ignatius Cahyanto, Ph.D.Associate Professor, Department of Management at University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Paul Stansbie, Ph.D., MBA, CHE
Paul Stansbie, Ph.D., MBA, CHEAssociate Dean, College of Education and Community Innovation at Grand Valley State University
John C. Crotts, Ph. D.
John C. Crotts, Ph. D.Professor of Hospitality and Tourism Management at the College of Charleston
Linchi Kwok, Ph.D.
Linchi Kwok, Ph.D.Professor at The Collins College of Hospitality Management, California State Polytechnic University Pomona
Ed Walker
Ed WalkerProgram Director and Assistant Professor at Dallas Baptist University
Vanja Bogicevic
Vanja BogicevicClinical Assistant Professor of Hospitality Marketing at the NYUSPS Jonathan M. Tisch Center of Hospitality
Mehmet Erdem
Mehmet ErdemAssociate Professor of Hotel Operations & Technology William F. Harrah College of Hospitality, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Hicham Jaddoud
Hicham JaddoudSenior Director of Hospitality Operations at North Star Casino Resort in Wisconsin and Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Southern California and Facilitate Hospitality Management Courses at Cornell University
Emily Ma
Emily MaAssociate Professor, Department of Hospitality & Tourism Management Isenberg School of Management University of Massachusetts
Amrik Singh
Amrik SinghAssociate Professor in the Fritz Knoebel School of Hospitality Management in the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver
J. Bruce Tracey
J. Bruce TraceyProfessor of Management at Cornell University's School of Hotel Administration
Dr. Larry Barton
Dr. Larry BartonHospitality Risk and Safety Consultant and Professor of Public Safety, University of Central Florida
Lee Speronis
Lee SperonisAssociate Professor and Director of the School of Hospitality, Sport and Tourism Management at Husson University
Dr. Nada Eissa
Dr. Nada EissaAssociate Professor of Public Policy and Economics in the McCourt School of Public Policy, Georgetown University, and Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Christopher Muller
Christopher MullerProfessor of Practice, School of Hospitality Administration, Boston University
Full Data Set
Metro Area
Jun '21 Lost Jobs: % Total Jobs
Jun '21 Lost Jobs v. Feb '20
L&H Jobs Recovered (to Jun '21)
% L&H Recovered

Kahului, HI

-9.77%

-8,400

8,900

51.4%

Orlando, FL

-6.31%

-84,400

66,600

44.1%

Las Vegas, NV

-5.99%

-68,400

96,900

58.6%

New Orleans, LA

-4.51%

-26,700

22,600

45.8%

Naples, FL

-3.98%

-7,300

8,200

52.9%

Urban Honolulu, HI

-3.56%

-16,100

27,500

63.1%

San Francisco Bay , CA

-3.38%

-85,000

65,800

43.6%

Cape Coral, FL

-3.24%

-11,300

12,200

51.9%

Salinas, CA

-3.19%

-6,100

7,900

56.4%

San Jose/Sunnyvale/Santa Clara, CA

-3.10%

-32,800

19,600

37.4%

San Diego, CA

-2.72%

-41,800

60,000

58.9%

Santa Maria, CA

-2.59%

-5,500

8,200

59.9%

Sacramento, CA

-2.51%

-26,700

27,900

51.1%

North Port, FL

-2.34%

-8,500

15,000

63.8%

Los Angeles Metro, CA

-2.20%

-144,200

203,300

58.5%

Portland, OR

-2.02%

-26,200

36,400

58.1%

New York Metro (NY/NJ)

-2.02%

-195,700

337,200

63.3%

Miami, FL

-1.97%

-61,300

112,400

64.7%

Washington, DC Metro

-1.91%

-65,400

102,200

61.0%

Durham, NC

-1.87%

-5,700

7,500

56.8%

Lexington, KY

-1.77%

-4,700

9,400

66.7%

Seattle, WA

-1.71%

-36,900

48,100

56.6%

Reno, NV

-1.66%

-4,300

16,700

79.5%

Greater Chicago , IL

-1.63%

-75,600

148,400

66.3%

Riverside, CA

-1.59%

-32,200

43,200

57.3%

Oxnard, CA

-1.59%

-6,500

10,600

62.0%

Atlantic City, NJ

-1.56%

-1,800

27,800

93.9%

Santa Rosa, CA

-1.53%

-3,800

9,600

71.6%

Madison, WI

-1.50%

-5,700

14,800

72.2%

Columbia, SC

-1.48%

-5,800

10,700

64.8%

Boston, MA

-1.42%

-38,700

118,000

75.3%

Fresno, CA

-1.32%

-5,500

7,500

57.7%

Atlanta, GA

-1.32%

-40,400

92,400

69.6%

Richmond, VA

-1.30%

-8,800

21,600

71.1%

Nashville, TN

-1.28%

-13,600

35,200

72.1%

Albuquerque, NM

-1.26%

-5,300

14,600

73.4%

Tucson, AZ

-1.25%

-6,000

13,100

68.6%

Greensboro, NC

-1.22%

-4,400

11,600

72.5%

Phoenix, AZ

-1.19%

-29,000

71,900

71.3%

Detroit, MI

-1.17%

-24,100

87,700

78.4%

Greater Philadelphia, PA

-1.17%

-35,500

113,000

76.1%

Austin, TX

-1.15%

-14,200

47,300

76.9%

Springfield, MA

-1.11%

-4,000

14,100

77.9%

Asheville, NC

-1.08%

-2,500

14,200

85.0%

Denver, CO

-1.08%

-17,700

62,500

77.9%

Bakersfield, CA

-1.07%

-3,800

6,100

61.6%

Baltimore, MD

-1.07%

-15,900

52,400

76.7%

Minneapolis, MN

-1.06%

-21,000

81,100

79.4%

Columbus, OH

-1.05%

-11,200

39,500

77.9%

Indianapolis, IN

-0.99%

-10,300

36,300

77.9%

Syracuse, NY

-0.97%

-2,800

13,700

83.0%

Toledo, OH

-0.96%

-2,800

12,700

81.9%

Salt Lake City, UT

-0.95%

-6,300

21,900

77.7%

Tampa, FL

-0.92%

-14,100

58,300

80.5%

Raleigh, NC

-0.89%

-6,400

28,800

81.8%

Greenville, SC

-0.88%

-3,700

15,600

80.8%

Milwaukee, WI

-0.87%

-6,800

34,400

83.5%

Chattanooga, TN

-0.86%

-2,300

8,700

79.1%

San Antonio, TX

-0.85%

-10,000

45,800

82.1%

Deltona, FL

-0.85%

-2,500

12,200

83.0%

Pittsburgh, PA

-0.81%

-9,300

52,200

84.9%

Winston, NC

-0.81%

-2,600

9,500

78.5%

Cleveland, OH

-0.80%

-8,100

42,300

83.9%

Jackson, MS

-0.79%

-2,000

7,800

79.6%

Charleston, SC

-0.78%

-3,000

21,600

87.8%

Little Rock, AR

-0.75%

-2,600

10,700

80.5%

Dayton, OH

-0.74%

-2,800

13,100

82.4%

Palm Bay, FL

-0.72%

-2,000

10,300

83.7%

Jacksonville, FL

-0.71%

-5,500

29,900

84.5%

St Louis, MO

-0.71%

-10,100

55,500

84.6%

Grand Rapids, MI

-0.65%

-3,700

23,700

86.5%

Akron, OH

-0.64%

-2,200

14,100

86.5%

Cincinnati, OH

-0.54%

-5,900

52,900

90.0%

Dallas-Fort Worth, TX

-0.52%

-20,200

139,500

87.4%

Hartford, CT

-0.48%

-2,900

24,800

89.5%

Colorado Springs, CO

-0.46%

-1,600

15,300

90.5%

Pensacola, FL

-0.45%

-1,000

7,900

88.8%

Rochester, NY

-0.45%

-2,200

22,200

91.0%

Memphis, TN

-0.44%

-2,700

20,900

88.6%

Baton Rouge, LA

-0.44%

-1,800

14,900

89.2%

Virginia Beach, VA

-0.44%

-3,700

35,800

90.6%

Augusta, GA

-0.42%

-1,100

7,500

87.2%

Albany, NY

-0.40%

-1,700

19,600

92.0%

Gulfport, MS

-0.38%

-600

12,600

95.5%

Charlotte, NC

-0.37%

-4,900

54,500

91.8%

Louisville/Jefferson County, KY

-0.35%

-2,300

29,400

92.7%

Savannah, GA

-0.32%

-600

11,600

95.1%

El Paso, TX

-0.31%

-1,100

13,800

92.6%

Allentown, PA

-0.31%

-1,300

18,700

93.5%

Bridgeport, CT

-0.27%

-1,200

21,300

94.7%

McAllen, TX

-0.27%

-900

9,100

91.0%

Providence, RI

-0.25%

-1,700

37,200

95.6%

Birmingham, AL

-0.24%

-1,300

18,700

93.5%

Houston, TX

-0.24%

-8,000

119,900

93.7%

Knoxville, TN

-0.19%

-800

14,900

94.9%

Corpus Christi, TX

-0.10%

-200

8,100

97.6%

Buffalo, NY

-0.10%

-500

32,400

98.5%

Wichita, KS

-0.10%

-300

13,100

97.8%

Kansas City, MO

-0.06%

-700

48,100

98.6%

Harrisburg, PA

0.00%

0

15,600

100.0%

Oklahoma City, OK

0.00%

0

25,700

100.0%

Fayetteville, AR

0.11%

300

11,000

102.8%

Boise, ID

0.13%

500

15,000

103.4%

Tulsa, OK

0.15%

700

15,800

104.6%

Omaha, NE

0.19%

900

21,900

104.3%

Des Moines, IA

0.62%

2,200

19,700

112.6%

Myrtle Beach, SC

2.60%

4,900

23,500

126.3%

Methodology

The MoneyGeek data analysis team gathered data of industries by metropolitan statistical area (MSA) published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics to generate its listings.

The team reviewed 338 MSAs with leisure and hospitality job data and selected cities to determine the most recovered cities. The final list of most recovered cities was determined based on the MSAs that had over 25,000 leisure and hospitality jobs in February 2020 and then ordered based on the number of recovered jobs divided by the total employment for the MSA in all sectors in February 2020. This calculation normalizes for the size of the city and for the proportion of leisure and hospitality jobs in that city’s economy. Any city that had recovered less than the average job recovery list was removed from the listing of most recovered jobs.

To find the cities that had lost the most hospitality jobs, we calculated the lowest leisure and hospitality employment number since February 2020 versus June 2021’s employment levels to calculate the total lost jobs due to coronavirus. The amount of recovered jobs is calculated as the difference between job numbers in June 2021 and February 2020. An MSA with zero jobs recovered indicates that June 2021 is their lowest month.

To determine the cities hurt the most by leisure and hospitality losses, we calculated the number of jobs lost between February 2020 and June 2021. This number was divided by the total employment for the city in February 2020 to quantify the impact of these lost jobs on overall employment in the city.

About Danielle Kiser


Danielle Kiser headshot

Danielle is a professional journalist with fifteen years of experience covering current events from the 2008 financial crisis to the COVID-19 global economic recession. As a former TV news producer, she focuses on sharing relevant and factual stories that stimulate personal growth and knowledge.

Danielle graduated from the acclaimed University of Missouri School of Journalism with a focus in Broadcast Journalism.

With six out-of-state moves and three home purchases under her belt, she has first-hand experience navigating state regulations, insurance and real estate. She currently lives in Colorado with her husband and a greyhound named Oreo.


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