Featured Expert
Michael Barry
Michael Barry Insurance Information Institute View bio

With its lush forests and historic towns, Mississippi can be a beautiful place to drive, but it’s also dangerous. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, Mississippi has the country’s third-highest fatality rate per mile driven. Not everyone heeds the threat: 23 percent of Mississippi’s drivers lack insurance, nearly twice the national average. Read on to learn more about the coverage you need to protect yourself on the road in the Magnolia State.

Mississippi Vehicle Insurance Requirements

Summary

With a median annual income of $35,521, Mississippi is the poorest state in the country. Mississippi drivers spend less on their car insurance than the national average, but car insurance is still a big expense.

Insurers aren’t required to give discounts, but smart shoppers can often find deals. And because the state is cracking down on people who flout insurance laws, getting the cheap but robust coverage has never made more sense.

Who Needs Vehicle Insurance in Mississippi?

Everyone who drives in Mississippi needs to have liability insurance or show another form of financial responsibility.

If you can’t get an insurer to cover you because of your driving history or risk profile, you can apply for insurance from the Mississippi Automobile Insurance Assigned Risk Plan. The plan provides bodily injury and property damage liability insurance to high-risk drivers who can’t get an insurance policy on their own.

To be eligible for the plan, you must apply and certify that you have attempted to obtain insurance during the past two months but were unable to get a policy. Assigned risk insurance costs more, so try to get your own policy before resorting to the assigned risk pool.

Proof of Insurance

You are required to carry proof of insurance in your car at all times. This can be a paper copy or an electronic version of your insurance card on your mobile device.

You risk a citation and fine if you have insurance but can’t prove it. A police officer cannot pull you over only to check your insurance card, but he or she can ask for it if you are pulled over for any other reason.

Minimum Liability Insurance Requirements

The minimum amount of liability coverage required to legally drive in Mississippi is:

  • $25,000 for injury for one person
  • $50,000 for injury for two or more people in one accident
  • $25,000 in property damage liability

Alternatives to Insurance

Most people choose to purchase a car insurance policy, but there are alternatives. You could buy a bond or make a $100,000 cash deposit with the state. If you’re at fault in an accident that costs more than your bond or cash deposit, though, you may still be liable for the difference.

What Happens If You Drive Without Car Insurance in Mississippi?

If you are caught driving without insurance, the penalty is up to $1,000 and a suspension of driving privileges for a year, or until you can show proof of insurance. If you are able to show proof of insurance at court, you may get the fine reduced to $100.

The state may also require you to file an SR22 certificate from your insurer, which verifies that you have purchased liability insurance and will maintain it for a certain period of time (often three years).

How Much Vehicle Insurance Do You Need?

The law sets the minimum amount of liability insurance you must have, but experts recommend getting liability coverage of $100,000 per injury and $300,000 per accident. Often this may only cost a few more dollars a month.

What Percentage of Drivers in
Mississippi Lack Vehicle Insurance?
22.9% National Average: 12.6 %

Other common types of car insurance include:

Uninsured Motorist Coverage: This coverage could come in handy in a state like Mississippi, where such a high percentage of drivers are uninsured. It covers your medical expenses if you are in an accident and the person at fault is uninsured.

Collision/Comprehensive Coverage: If you have a new car with a loan, your lender will probably require you to have collision and comprehensive insurance.

Medical Coverage: If you don’t already have good health insurance, this could save you a lot of money if you’re injured in an accident.

If you decide you want a certain type of coverage but the price tag seems too high, consider increasing your deductible. Talk with your insurance agent about what is right for you.

Car Insurance and Special Groups

Teen Drivers in Mississippi

Mississippi has a graduated driver’s license program for teens, which safety experts recommend to help teens gain driving experience under the safest conditions. But the state still earns a “dangerous” rating for teen driver safety laws from Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety because it hasn’t passed a number of recommended safety laws for teens, including:

  • Requiring at least 30 hours of supervised driving during the permit period
  • Limiting the number of teen passengers that teenage drivers can carry
  • Requiring teens to be at least 18 to get an unrestricted license

Teens are notoriously expensive to insure because they are considered high-risk drivers, mostly due to their lack of experience behind the wheel and their impulsive behavior.

“Parents are going to pay more when they add a young driver to their auto insurance policy,” said Michael Barry, vice president of media relations at the Insurance Information Institute. “Yet high school and college students who maintain at least a 3.0 grade point average (GPA) can usually quality for a good student discount.”

Mississippi Car Insurance: The Impact of a Teen Driver

Median annual price change for families with a teen driver on their policy:

$1,732 increase This is a difference of 106%.
Comparison of Premium Ranges
25th - 75th Percentile Median
Watch Your Speedometer

Average annual premium increase if a teen gets a speeding ticket for driving 11-15 mph over the speed limit:

Male teen

$346

Speedometer
Female teen

$316

What Are the Savings for Mississippi Teens?

Impact on annual premium with Good Student and Defensive Driving discounts:

$274 saved

How Mississippi Insurer Premiums Compare

Policy cost vary more than you may think, so shop around. The annual average premiums for a married couple with a 16-year-old teen driver in Mississippi differ by thousands of dollars:

Insurance Provider Min MEDIAN MAX
Nationwide $1,677 $2,498 $4,356
Mississippi Farm Bureau $1,552 $3,110 $5,168
Progressive $1,884 $3,652 $7,040
State Farm $2,284 $4,272 $7,736
Allstate $2,454 $4,554 $9,251

Car Choices for Teens: Impact on Mississippi Premiums

Insurers consider sports cars a more risky choice for teens than sedans and minivans, and premium rates reflect it.

Average premium for two 2014
Mustang GTs

$4,619

Average premium for two 2008
Town and Country Limiteds

$3,042

Annual benefit of minivans:

$1,577 saved This is 34% less expensive.
Premium Comparison for Two Adults + 16 Year Old
25th - 75th Percentile Median

College Students in Mississippi

When your child starts college, it’s a good idea to call your insurance company to inform them of any change in living conditions or driving habits.

If she continues living at home, there may be no change to your premiums. But if she is moving away, you could save money. “If you’ve got a college student on your policy, and the student is living at least 100 miles from home during the school year without having access to a car, let your insurance professional know,” says Barry. “That should reduce your premiums.”

Mississippi College Students vs. Teen Drivers

Median annual premium change with a college student vs. high school driver

$610 decrease This is a decrease of 17%.
Comparison of Premium Ranges
25th - 75th Percentile Median

Annual Premiums: How Mississippi Insurers Compare

Each year, take a look at your policy before it renews to see whether you could get a better deal. Check out the average premiums for a married couple with a 19-year-old college student in Mississippi.

Provider Min MEDIAN MAX
Nationwide $1,553 $2,221 $3,545
Mississippi Farm Bureau $1,252 $2,544 $4,216
State Farm $1,351 $2,580 $5,109
Progressive $1,556 $3,047 $5,880
Allstate $2,079 $3,788 $7,256

Distance Discount: Savings for Mississippi College Students

You may see a modest break in your family’s premium if your student lives 150+ miles away from home with no access to a car.

Average premium for a 19-year-old male
  • $3,284 at home
  • $2,916 at school
  • $368 in savings
Average premium for a 19-year-old female
  • $2,836 at home
  • $2,596 at school
  • $240 in savings

Mississippi College Drivers: Mustangs vs. Minivans

You'll save on your premium if your college student drives a minivan rather than a sports car — a reflection of the lower risk to insurers.

2014 Mustang GTs (2)

$3,707

2008 Town and Country Limited minivans (2)

$2,381

Annual benefit of minivans

$1,326 saved This is 36% less expensive.
Premium Comparison for Two Adults + College Driver
25th - 75th Percentile Median

Military Drivers in Mississippi

More than 12,000 active duty military personnel live in Mississippi. If you are deployed for a long period and your vehicle will be left unused at home, be sure to notify your insurer and ask about discounts or whether you can suspend all or part of your coverage.

If money is tight, you may want to cancel your coverage while you are away. Mississippi law does not allow an insurance company to increase your rate if you cancelled or didn’t renew your policy because you were called to active duty — as long as your car was not used during the cancellation period. However, you will be responsible for the costs if your car is damaged or stolen in your absence, so be sure it is in a secure place.

If you are a Mississippi resident temporarily deployed out of state, you can renew your license by mail. Otherwise, you will have 90 days after discharge to renew your license upon your return to Mississippi. If you are a resident of another state temporarily stationed in Mississippi, you and your family can continue to drive with your license and registration from home.

Mississippi Service Members:
How Vehicle Choice Affects Your Premium

Insurers associate sports cars with reckless driving, according to the Insurance Information Institute, and our research shows an older model SUV still has less impact on your premium than a recent model sports car.

Military Drivers: A Comparison of Premium Ranges by Driver Age and Vehicle
25-Year-Old Driver
50-Year-Old Driver
25th - 75th Percentile Median

Age-Based Perks for Mississippi
Service Members

Median auto insurance
for service members:

$1,186
Male (25 yrs)$1,450
Male (50 yrs)$1,147
$303 savings
Female (25 yrs)$1,381
Female (50 yrs)$1,131
$250 savings

Compare Average Premiums Available to Mississippi Military Personnel

Before your policy renews, it pays to do some comparison shopping. Check out the average annual rates you can get in Mississippi.

Premium Comparison for a Military Driver
25th - 75th Percentile Median

Seniors in Mississippi

Mississippi does not mandate senior discounts on car insurance, but many insurance companies do offer discounts to drivers over 55 who complete a safe driving course. Once you turn 70, some discount programs are discontinued because your risk of an accident increases.

You may also be able to get a discount on your car insurance if you don’t drive much, or if you limit your driving to daylight hours. “Ask your insurance professional about whether you qualify for low-mileage discounts or consider raising your deductible to keep premiums down,” Barry said.

Undocumented Workers in Mississippi

If you are not a U.S. citizen, you must provide proof of legal immigration status when you apply for a driver’s license in Mississippi. Immigrants who are in the country legally can get a license; undocumented immigrants cannot.

Young immigrants who are registered under President Obama’s 2012 Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program are out of luck as well. Mississippi is one of a handful of states that announced it would not allow immigrants registered under the DACA program — meaning they arrived in the country as children — to access any benefits, including driver’s licenses.

This decision may contribute to Mississippi’s high rate of uninsured drivers, since a driver’s license is a prerequisite for car insurance. In addition, studies show that uninsured drivers are three to five times more likely to get in a car crash.

Ridesharing Insurance in Mississippi: Are You Covered?

If you are a driver for a transportation networking company (TNC) like Uber or Lyft, check with the company to be sure you are fully covered. Mississippi has not passed legislation regulating transportation networking companies (TNCs). In 2015, the state Senate considered a bill that would have required a minimum amount of TNC insurance coverage, but it died in committee.

Your TNC probably provides some liability coverage while you are carrying passengers, but it may not cover your medical costs or physical damage to your vehicle. Once you understand what the TNC covers, call your insurance agent. Usually personal insurance policies won’t cover drivers if they are using their vehicle to transport people for money. You may need to purchase commercial insurance.

Car Accidents: How to File a Claim in Mississippi

If you are in an accident, call the police if anyone is injured or killed, or if property damage appears to exceed $500.

Exchange information with the other driver, including your name, address, registration number, license number and insurance company name. Take notes about the accident and what happened, and take photos or maybe sketch a picture of the scene. The Mississippi Insurance Department advises you not to admit fault. Even if it is your fault, you can leave that determination to the police and the insurance companies.

When the police arrive on the scene, you must show them proof of insurance. Call your insurance company as soon as possible to inform them of the accident. Your claim should be paid or denied promptly. If the insurer denies your claim, they must explain why in writing. If you are unable to resolve a dispute with your insurance company, contact the Insurance Department to file a complaint.

Driver Safety: How Does Mississippi Rank?

Mississippi Driver Safety Ranking

42nd in the U.S.
About Our Data

The driver safety table shows the different safety factors that contribute to your state's overall safety rank (in the green box). The overall safety ranking and the National Ranking column scores in each category (including crash fatality rates) are from safest to most dangerous, with 1st being the safest and 51st the least safe.

How did we create the safety rankings?

We created a traffic safety ranking of all US states plus the District of Columbia by combining data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. We looked at fatality rates by distance traveled as well as by population and gave more weight to behaviors that were riskier and preventable (i.e., drunk driving, not using a seat belt), as well as to accidents that involved more than one party (i.e., multi-vehicle).

Driver Safety Profile Number of Fatalities Fatality Rate

The fatality rate is the rate per one billion vehicle miles traveled, except for pedestrian and bicyclist fatality measures, which are per measured per a population of 100,000.

Ranking
(National)

Rankings are in order of safest to least safe. A state with the lowest fatality rate would be the safest, and thus ranked #1.

Drunk Driving-Related Fatalities 208 5.38 47th
Speeding-Related Fatalities 113 2.92 22nd
Passenger Vehicle Unrestrained Fatalities 284 7.33 50th
Unhelmeted Motorcycle Fatalities 3 0.08 9th
Multiple Vehicle Fatalities 220 5.68 39th
Pedestrian Fatalities 53 1.77 40th
Bicyclist Fatalities 6 0.20 32nd
Total Vehicle Fatalities 613 15.82 49th

Sources: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

Mississippi: Protecting You from Injury on the Road

Mississippi falls “dangerously behind” in adopting some key traffic safety laws, according to Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety. The state only requires people in the front seat to wear seat belts, allows people to talk on the cell phone while driving and to carry open containers of alcohol in the car. On the bright side, the state requires all motorcyclists and passengers to wear helmets and passed a ban on texting while driving in 2015. There were 607 fatalities on Mississippi roads in 2014, and crashes cost the state about $2.7 billion.

Safe Driving Laws – Mississippi

  Requirement State Law Details
Mandatory seatbelts Partial For front seat only
Child passenger safety Child seat required until age 4, booster seat required until age 6 (and < 57” or < 65 lbs)
Driving under the influence (DUI) 90-day license suspension for conviction
Ignition interlock after DUI Mandatory for all convictions
Talking on cell or texting while driving Texting while driving banned in 2015
Protections for young drivers During first six months with license, no driving 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. Sun-Thurs, and 11:30 p.m. – 6 a.m., Fri-Sat
Motorcycle helmet law Universal helmet law
Bicycle helmet law No statewide law

Source: Governors Highway Safety Association, 2016

Car Insurance Resources for Mississippi Residents

Department of Public Safety

You can renew your driver’s license, pay reinstatement fees and check your driving record online here.

Insurance Department

Here you can find information about insurance requirements and penalties.

Department of Transportation

Maintains the roadways and provides information on traffic safety and road conditions.

Hurricane Guide

The Department of Transportation provides a guide with evacuation routes and safety tips for drivers, just in case. Remember: if a hurricane’s approaching, head north.

Licensed Insurance Companies Search

The state provides a searchable database of all companies licensed to sell you insurance in Mississippi.