Illinois Minimum Car Insurance Requirements, Penalties and Other Auto Insurance Laws

Illinois’ minimum car insurance requirements include having 25/50/20 in liability limits and uninsured and underinsured motorists coverage. This means that policies should have at least $25,000 in bodily injury coverage per person with a limit of $50,000 per accident, $20,000 in property damage coverage and $25,000 in uninsured motorist bodily injury limits per person with a limit of $50,000 per accident. The minimum coverage only protects third parties injured in an accident and drivers involved in an accident with an uninsured driver. Still, you can purchase additional coverage for extra protection. Driving without car insurance in Illinois is illegal and drivers can get fined and penalized.

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What Is the Minimum Car Insurance Requirement in Illinois?

How much car insurance you need in Illinois can vary, as it depends on your unique situation. However, Illinois’ car insurance laws state all drivers must have an auto insurance policy that follows the minimum requirements of 25/50/20 with uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage. This means that drivers should have at least:

  • $25,000 in bodily injury per person
  • $50,000 in bodily injury per accident
  • $20,000 in property damage
  • $25,000 in uninsured motorist coverage per person
  • $50,000 in uninsured motorist coverage per accident
  • Underinsured motorist bodily injury insurance

While these are the minimums, drivers can fully consider purchasing higher limits to protect themselves from lawsuits or exorbitant medical bills.

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What Does This Minimum Coverage Mean?

Illinois requires that all drivers have minimum liability coverage of 25/50/20 and uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage. This includes $50,000 in bodily injury coverage per accident with a $25,000 limit per person, which helps drivers pay for any third-party injuries sustained in an accident. In addition, a property damage limit of $20,000 is needed to help cover the costs of damages to a third party’s vehicle or personal property.

Uninsured motorist (UM) coverage can help drivers cover any bodily injury costs if an uninsured motorist is at fault. This includes medical expenses, loss of wages due to injuries, funeral expenses and more. Drivers need $50,000 in uninsured motorist coverage per accident with a $25,000 limit per person. Underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage covers the difference between the at-fault driver’s liability limits and your UIM coverage limits.

How Much Does the Minimum Car Insurance Cost in Illinois?

Insurers in Illinois use various factors to determine your auto insurance premiums, such as your age, postal code, credit score and other factors. Which insurer you choose can also affect your premiums, as some insurers may hold some aspects, such as your credit score, in higher regard compared to others. The cheapest insurer in Illinois is GEICO, whose auto insurance costs an average of $366 per year.

Cheapest Minimum Liability Car Insurance in Illinois

Cheapest Minimum Car Insurance in Illinois
  • Company
    Annually
    Monthly
  • 1.
    $366
    $31
  • 2.
    $367
    $31
  • 3.
    $385
    $32
  • 4.
    $411
    $34
  • 5.
    $454
    $38

These prices are only estimates based on rates for an average Illinois driver and should not be used to compare insurance prices.

MoneyGeek gathered quotes for a policy following the state’s minimum of 25/50/20 with uninsured and uninsured motorists coverage using a sample profile. The profile used was a 40-year-old Illinois resident with a 2010 Toyota Camry and a good driving record and history.

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What Is the Minimum Car Insurance Requirement in Illinois While Leasing a Car?

In Illinois, financial leasing companies may have different insurance requirements compared to that of the state. This is usually higher because companies will want to protect their financial interests. The majority of leasing companies require that you have full coverage insurance with a minimum liability limit of 100/300/50. As this can still vary from company to company, contact your leasing company to determine your minimum coverage.

While Illinois’ minimum car insurance requirements can help ensure that drivers are protected, it might not be enough if medical bills and other costs skyrocket. 11.8% of drivers in Illinois are uninsured. Although uninsured motorist coverage is required, increasing your limits might save you from paying for costly expenses on top of your insurance.

Overall, how much car insurance you need will depend on how much you want to be protected. MoneyGeek recommends getting full coverage insurance with at least 50/100/50 in liability limits, but it’s best to get a policy that best suits your needs.

Penalties for Driving Without Car Insurance in Illinois

In Illinois, car insurance is a requirement for all drivers. Driving without insurance is illegal and can lead to consequences like penalties or fines. Always keep your proof of car insurance in their vehicle. This can be your insurance ID or a printed copy of the policy.

Illinois’ car insurance laws state drivers can get the following penalties for driving without auto insurance:

First Offense

  • Drivers license and/or privileges will be suspended
  • License plate will be suspended
  • Fined around $500

Second and Subsequent Offenses

  • Driving licenses and/or privileges will be suspended for four months
  • License plate will be suspended for four months
  • Will be required to file for an SR-22
  • Fined around $1,000

Frequently Asked Questions About Car Insurance in Illinois

To help drivers understand the laws on car insurance in Illinois, MoneyGeek has answered a few frequently asked questions below.

Learn More About Car Insurance

About the Author


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Mark Fitzpatrick is a senior content manager with MoneyGeek specializing in insurance. Mark has years of experience analyzing the insurance market and creating original research and content. He graduated from Boston College with a Bachelor of Arts and Johns Hopkins University with a Master of Arts.


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